A good result for Scottish construction professionals – it has been reported by the Office for National Statistics that the industry’s productivity levels and output has reached record heights of success. The results, which highlighted the output figures at the close of last year, signifies the growing prosperity of the construction sector in Scotland, with the output figure reaching in at a staggering £14.5bn, a welcomed increase from the £14bn previous-high experienced in the 12 months building up to last September.

With clear indications of a prosperous Scottish construction industry, it has also been highlighted that many of the key industry sectors have all contributed to the figure, hinting at quite widespread success, as opposed to success solely in one sector alone. Of those performing best, however, infrastructure is the frontrunner, which boasted a figure clocking in at about £4bn, effectively some 28% of the total output over the year.

Additionally, the private commercial sector also performed incredibly well, adding another £2.4 to the pot, with a further £2.3bn seen in the much-welcomed housing sector, where investment is surely deemed a priority.

Yet, despite the positive figures and inherent outlook of the sector, construction professionals have highlighted the impact that employment and recruitment figures may have on the continued success of the sector. With the present employment levels sitting well below to the figures reported pre-recession, concerns have been raised as to how, and why the construction industry has been able to perform at such levels with employment levels being maintained at such a low level.

Keen to develop the integral link between productivity and levels of employment, the Scottish Building Federation’s Managing Director, Vaughan Hart commented that: “Against that backdrop, there is still work to be done to secure sustainable long-term growth in the Scottish construction industry – no least by re-establishing the important link between output and employment within the sector.”