BDC

Search
BDC Magazine

July 5, 2016

Churches put their faith in green energy

©Andrew Fox/Alamy Wind and solar farms have always had faithful adherents in the environmental movement but now more than 3,500 churches have turned their back on fossil fuels to embrace renewable energy. Churches from a range of denominations have either made such a switch or registered their interest in doing

Read More »

Plans in for £80m Liverpool tower block – jp

Liverpool City Council is considering plans for an £80m high-rise apartment block on Princes Dock. Above: The Princes Dock tower Plans for the 34-storey tower have been submitted by Moda Living and Apache Capital Partners, through their private rented sector (PRS) joint venture. The Princes Reach development, which forms part

Read More »

Plumbing problems weigh on Travis Perkins

Builders’ merchant group Travis Perkins saw its profits nosedive in 2016 after reorganisation of its plumbing & heating operations. Above: PTS – a Travis Perkins brand Travis Perkins’ 2016 revenue was up 4.6% for the year to 31st December 2016, reaching £6,217m. Pre-tax profit was down 67% to £73m (2015:

Read More »

Manor House Price Now 11 Times Higher than National Average

The average cost of a manor house is now £2,102,344 which is 11 times higher than the national average, according to the latest sale price analysis from Jackson-Stops & Staff. The estate agent, which has 44 offices throughout the UK, states that the manor house cost is almost double the

Read More »

Fujitsu Launches New Dublin Training Centre

Fujitsu has launched a new training centre at its offices in Dublin dedicated to the air conditioning sector. The opening of the new facility enhances the firm’s commitment to its training services and Ian Carroll, the company’s Sales and Marketing Director, commented that Fujitsu is fully committed to raising industry

Read More »

‘Central Heating for Cities’ to Receive £320m Investment

£320 million is to be pumped into the UK’s heat network schemes over the next five year period in order to supply homes and businesses with low carbon heat. Currently, the government is consulting on the best ways to deploy the £320 million fund which was allocated to heat network

Read More »

Manchester Skyscraper Secures Planning Permission

Planning permission has been granted by Manchester City Council for the construction of a skyscraper that will be the tallest building in the city when complete. To be built on Owen Street, the 64 storey construction will house 496 apartments and will dwarf the nearby 48 storey Beetham Tower. The

Read More »

Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

July 5, 2016

Students invited to travel the world in 2015: RIBA Boyd Auger Scholarship – call for entries

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is calling for applications for the 2015 RIBA Boyd Auger Scholarship. The generous scholarship, awarded since 2008, supports the personal, professional and academic development of its recipients by contributing towards their imaginative and original research and travel. In 2015, one scholarship worth £5,000 is available to individuals or groups of students and graduates for a period of international travel (which can coincide with international work experience). Applications for funding international travel associated with architecture-related work in non-governmental organisations or as part of broader research at postgraduate level (namely towards Masters or PhD/MPhil programmes) are also welcome. The deadline for applications is 1 June 2015. For more information, head to the RIBA Boyd Auger Scholarship.   ENDS Notes to editors 1. For further press information contact Callum Reilly in the RIBA Press Office: callum.reilly@riba.org 020 7307 3757 2. For more information, visit: http://www.architecture.com/RIBABoydAugerScholarship 3. Interested applicants should contact Hayley Russell hayley.russell@riba.org 020 7307 3678 if they require help with their applications. 4. In 2007, Mrs Margot Auger made a donation to the RIBA in memory of her late husband, the architect and civil engineer Boyd Auger, for the creation and administration of a funding scheme to reward a student or group of students of architecture. Since it was first awarded in 2008, the scholarship has funded nine talented students. 5. Boyd Auger achieved international fame in 1968 when he used computer programming to address a difficult housing problem in Italy. Even though the project was never built, Auger’s proposal was exhibited at the Royal Academy in London and his radically innovative methods (which maximised light, view and privacy in housing design) were featured in the BBC television programme ‘Cities of the Future’. In 1969 he won the Reynold Memorial Award by the American Institute of Architects for best use of aluminium in his Gyrotron project, a 200-foot space-frame structure built in 1967 for the Montreal Expo. His was the second ever British project to receive the Reynold Memorial award, following James Stirling and James Gowan in 1965 for their engineering block at Leicester University. 6. The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture and our members www.architecture.com 7. Follow us on Twitter for regular RIBA updates: @RIBA www.twitter.com/RIBA   Posted on Monday 9th March 2015 Source link

Read More »

Churches put their faith in green energy

©Andrew Fox/Alamy Wind and solar farms have always had faithful adherents in the environmental movement but now more than 3,500 churches have turned their back on fossil fuels to embrace renewable energy. Churches from a range of denominations have either made such a switch or registered their interest in doing so, but Catholics have proved especially keen, according to figures from religious charities released on Thursday. More On this topic IN UK Business & Economy Nearly 2,000 Catholic parishes have forsaken conventional energy in favour of green electricity in 16 dioceses, the charities said. Some made the decision after Pope Francis issued an encyclical last year urging the world to cut its dependence on fossil fuels. “Pope Francis challenges us all to ‘care for our common home’, and by adopting renewable energy we will directly help people threatened, and already most severely affected, by climate change,” said John Arnold, Bishop of Salford, one of the 16 dioceses to have switched. “There are many ways in which we may respond to the threat and the reality of climate change and adopting renewable energy for our church buildings must be a priority.” In some cases, churches had banded together to use their collective buying power to secure green energy tariffs from companies that bought or produced at least 80 per cent of their electricity from renewable sources, said Tim Gee, campaigns leader at Christian Aid. A number had saved money but in certain instances this was because the churches had not switched suppliers in a long time, he said. “The very cheapest electricity supplier is still fossil fuels,” he said, but the churches had still been able to obtain the cheapest available renewable energy tariffs. The overriding reason for acting, he added, was to send a message to governments and investors that there needed to be a shift away from fossil fuels if the world were to avoid dangerous levels of climate change. “There really is a wave of enthusiasm for it,” Mr Gee said. “It’s relatively recent and it’s really sped up in the last year.” Some synagogues and mosques had also made the shift, he said. Some of the companies benefiting from the churches’ shift are smaller green energy groups such as Ecotricity and Good Energy rather than the larger “big six” suppliers. At least 100 Quaker meeting houses have switched to renewables by dealing directly with seven-year-old Good Energy. There really is a wave of enthusiasm for it. It’s relatively recent and it’s really sped up in the last year – Tim Gee, Christian Aid The move is part of a wider trend, according to the Energy UK trade association, which represents big six companies as well as smaller groups. “There is a real and increasing demand in the market for an energy supply contract which is based on more renewable sources,” a spokesman said. Christian Aid and the other charities that have collected data on churches are switching to green energy have not yet calculated the financial impact of their move on more established energy companies. “It’s certainly millions that have been shifted,” said Mr Gee. More than 900 Salvation Army buildings have switched to renewable energy suppliers, according to the charities’ data. Nearly 700 churches from several denominations have individually signed up for green power tariffs through the Big Church Switch website, which offers a simple way for churches to shift to green tariffs. Nicholas Holtam, the Bishop of Salisbury and the Church of England’s lead bishop on the environment, said the churches’ move was a response to a complex environmental crisis. “It is important that Christians rediscover older traditions of a godly relationship of humanity to the wider created order,” he said. “One simple thing we can do in response to such a crisis is to switch to using clean energy in our homes, communities, schools and places of worship.” Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2016. You may share using our article tools. Please don’t cut articles from FT.com and redistribute by email or post to the web. Source link

Read More »

Plans in for £80m Liverpool tower block – jp

Liverpool City Council is considering plans for an £80m high-rise apartment block on Princes Dock. Above: The Princes Dock tower Plans for the 34-storey tower have been submitted by Moda Living and Apache Capital Partners, through their private rented sector (PRS) joint venture. The Princes Reach development, which forms part of Peel Group’s wider £5.5bn regeneration of Liverpool Waters, will provide 304 apartments for rent. This is the second development by Moda Living and Apache Capital after its acquisition in February of the £128m 466-unit Angel Gardens development site in Manchester. The partnership has a PRS development pipeline of approximately 5,000 units in city centre sites across the UK. Richard Jackson, managing director of Apache Capital Partners, said: “This building has been designed to provide a legacy for Liverpool and its historic skyline. It will offer our customers a new aspirational residence and lifestyle that does not yet exist in Liverpool, combining the highest levels of design, amenities and services. Our investors continue to strongly support the funding of our secured premium PRS development pipeline across prime regional UK cities that we will own and operate for the long term.” Further Images This article was published on 6 Jun 2016 (last updated on 6 Jun 2016). Source link

Read More »

Plumbing problems weigh on Travis Perkins

Builders’ merchant group Travis Perkins saw its profits nosedive in 2016 after reorganisation of its plumbing & heating operations. Above: PTS – a Travis Perkins brand Travis Perkins’ 2016 revenue was up 4.6% for the year to 31st December 2016, reaching £6,217m. Pre-tax profit was down 67% to £73m (2015: £224m), primarily due to an impairment charge of £235m recognised against goodwill and other intangible and tangible assets in City Plumbing, PTS, F&P, bathrooms.com, Solfex and Tile Giant. The plumbing & heating market (which contributed £1,359m to Travis Perkins revenues in 2016) has been flat over recent years, Travis Perkins said, with declines in the social housing sector offset by growth in private new build and more modest growth in repair & maintenance work.  “Both the contract and local installer markets are increasingly competitive, with the traditional plumbing merchant channels under pressure from the significant expansion of online, fixed price multichannel operators and strong local and regional independents,” Travis Perkins said. “As a result of these market changes, conditions may worsen in 2017.” The company’s plumbing & heating division has already been reorganised in the past couple of years and further restructuring is ahead. The social housing boiler and heating replacement market has remained difficult with traditional merchants competing aggressively on price for business impacting PTS. The PTS management team developed a lower cost branch operating model in the year and trialled the model in a small number of locations. Chief executive John Carter said: “2016 was another solid year for the Group, with continued strong performances from the Consumer, Contracts and General Merchanting divisions, which together contributed 90% of Group adjusted operating profit. These businesses continued to benefit from the investments made in the branch network and customer propositions over the last three years, which provides a strong base for future growth. “It was a much more difficult year for the Plumbing & Heating division driven by structural challenges for traditional merchant businesses in this segment. Whilst the network restructuring work carried out in 2014 and 2015 created a more focused branch network, further work is required and over the next six months we will be exploring all routes to enhance returns. There are improvements we can make to the ranges we offer to our customers, our availability, our online presence and our service proposition. “The macro-economic outlook of the UK is mixed. The sharp decline in the value of sterling since June 2016 has created cost pressures on imported goods and materials, and the expectations for secondary housing market transactions and growth in the RMI market have weakened. We have a proven track record of managing our cost base and took decisive action in October 2016, announcing a restructuring programme to close underperforming branches and improve supply chain efficiency. We enter 2017 with a strong balance sheet and will continue to invest selectively in our leading businesses to further strengthen our competitive advantages which will enable us to continue to outperform and drive shareholder value over the medium term.”   This article was published on 2 Mar 2017 (last updated on 2 Mar 2017). Source link

Read More »

British Safety Council 2016 Annual Conference: Health and work in a changing world – London, 5 Oct 2016

British Safety Council 2016 Annual Conference Date and location Wednesday 5 October 2016, the King’s Fund, 11 – 13 Cavendish Square, London W1G 0AN Conference overview This year’s annual conference will attempt to de-mystify the meaning and place of health in the workplace. Who should attend? The event is for everyone from academics to risk managers to trade union representatives and is a great opportunity to share best practice with other like-minded professionals with an interest in health in the workplace. Further information and booking For further information, full programme details and booking visit the British Safety Council 2016 Annual Conference web page. If you have any queries about the event, please e-mail customer.service@britsafe.org or telephone +44 (0)20 3510 8355. Source link

Read More »

Manor House Price Now 11 Times Higher than National Average

The average cost of a manor house is now £2,102,344 which is 11 times higher than the national average, according to the latest sale price analysis from Jackson-Stops & Staff. The estate agent, which has 44 offices throughout the UK, states that the manor house cost is almost double the sale price of the average UK farmhouse, which has an average sale price of £1,089,857. Meanwhile the least expensive of the three typically English homes is the cottage, although the data also reveals that they do not offer the best value for money. On average, the old rectory style cottage comes in at £234 per sq ft, while the roomier barn conversion sosts around £288 per sq ft. Therefore, on this basis, cottages are more expensive at £320 per sq ft. While manor houses cost £1 million more than a farmhouse on average, they provide better value for money in terms of a price per sq ft basis (£343) which is just £23 more than a chocolate box style cottage (£320). Barn conversions are on average £378,066 cheaper than old rectories, which is more than the average sale price of a typical property in the UK. However, in terms of price per sq ft, old rectories provide greater value for money. Although barn conversions attract a higher sq ft premium because of their large open plan entertaining areas that fit in well with dinner party culture and modern lifestyles. Chairman of Jackson-Stops & Staff, Nick Leeming, commented that their research illustrates the feudal hierarchy that remains present in terms of the most popular quintessentially English homes. He believes that for large families who are in a position to invest in a historic property, manor houses offer the best value for money in terms of the space they provide rather than the cheaper farmhouse. The survey also revealed that the typical chocolate box cottage is the cheapest but they do not offer the best value for money with regard to size.

Read More »

Fujitsu Launches New Dublin Training Centre

Fujitsu has launched a new training centre at its offices in Dublin dedicated to the air conditioning sector. The opening of the new facility enhances the firm’s commitment to its training services and Ian Carroll, the company’s Sales and Marketing Director, commented that Fujitsu is fully committed to raising industry standards through training schemes having already pumped a significant investment into a similar state of the art training facility in Elstree. Even though the centre is yet to be officially opened, it has already started running courses due to the demand for training, with the firm’s highly skilled in house engineers teaching the courses due to their many years of experience working with Fujitsu products. The company has developed a specific series of courses which are created and designed to develop the engineers’ knowledge in the installation and design of Fujitsu air conditioning products and the best way they can be applied. Among the current range of courses on offer are VRF system installation and commissioning, mini VRF installation, commissioning and troubleshooting and VRF central controllers installation and commissioning. The courses are already proving popular with many contractors in the area being impressed with the training facilities. Martyn Ives, Training Manager at Fujitsu, said that the new Dublin based training facility is a much needed asset that will provide the required training that is needed to support the well-established product range. He added that all the courses are available throughout the year and are offered free of charge, with each delegate receiving a completion certificate and a full set of technical manuals. Last month the company assured the UK that it will continue its operations in the country following the UK’s decision to leave the European Union, reiterating its commitment to UK employees and customers.

Read More »

New Homes Planning Permissions in England Increase by 4% in First Quarter

The number of planning permissions granted for new homes in England rose by 4% in the first quarter of 2016, according to the latest housing pipeline report. In the first three months of the year permissions were granted for 66,102 homes, which is a 4% rise on the previous year, as shown by the report from Glenigan and the House Builders Federation. These figures mean that the moving yearly total has now recovered to levels near the pre-cash peak in the 12 months prior to March 2008, and is ahead of 2006 and 2007 levels, which suggests that house building can carry on meeting the high demand level for new homes. While many of these permissions still have a long way to go before construction can begin, the figures do give a strong indication about future supply. Ever since 2009 permissions have increased steadily, with actual housing supply also showing a marked increase over the last two years as more and more permissions have progressed to the stage where builders can commence with construction. The report also shows that the last year has seen an increase of 66% in permissions granted since the 2009 recession, with numbers now just 0.3% down on their highest point at the start of 2008. There is still a strong demand for new homes and the HBF estimates a shortfall of more than one billion homes in England, with a third of young people (3.35 million) living at home with their parents, while housing waiting lists are 1.24 million people long. The demand for new homes continues to be driven by the Help to Buy equity loan scheme, while interest rates stay at an historic low. In 2014/15 more than 180,000 new homes were added to the housing stock, which is a 22% increase on the year before, as house builders raised their output in response to the increase in demand for new homes.

Read More »

‘Central Heating for Cities’ to Receive £320m Investment

£320 million is to be pumped into the UK’s heat network schemes over the next five year period in order to supply homes and businesses with low carbon heat. Currently, the government is consulting on the best ways to deploy the £320 million fund which was allocated to heat network investment in the Spending Review. Labelled as ‘central heating for cities’, heat networks are already being used throughout cities in Scandinavia to heat homes in winter. The government believes that heat networks could reduce heating costs by over 30% in some households, with the investment being dubbed as “exciting news for towns and cities throughout the country” by the Department for Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Instead of each building having individual heaters, a heat network will comprise of one big central heat source (or more than one central source) of which heat is then piped into several buildings. A number of sources can take the heat such as large heat pumps, combines with power and heat plants and geothermal plants, which take heat from underground rocks miles below the earth’s surface. Then, it is pumped around businesses and homes, which will potentially bring down energy bill costs while also helping to cut carbon emissions. DECC thinks that the heat produced by waste incinerator plants can also be used in this way and distributed to nearby businesses and homes. Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Amber Rudd MP, said that this is a crucial next step in the development of more home grown energy, which is a key part of the government’s plan to ensure affordable energy and long term security for the country’s business and families. She added that the funding under consultation at the moment will allow these schemes to provide thousands of businesses and homes throughout the country with affordable low carbon energy.

Read More »

Manchester Skyscraper Secures Planning Permission

Planning permission has been granted by Manchester City Council for the construction of a skyscraper that will be the tallest building in the city when complete. To be built on Owen Street, the 64 storey construction will house 496 apartments and will dwarf the nearby 48 storey Beetham Tower. The new building will be built on land near Deansgate train station that was formerly used as a car park, and will be built alongside three slightly smaller structures. The tallest building will be just over 200 metres tall, while the other three are 37, 44 and 50 storeys tall, reaching 122, 140 and 158 metres respectively. Tower D is 44 floors and 140.4 metres tall, Tower C is 37 storeys and 122 metres tall and Tower B is 50 floors and 157.9 metres tall. CQ Investments, part of the Renaker Build group of firms, is the developer behind the project. SimpsonHaugh & Partners designed the scheme which also includes a cinema and basement car parking. The main four towers will range between 37 and 64 storeys, including a total of 1,508 apartments, with a further three story building which will house retail units, a swimming pool and a tennis court. Renaker Build’s Head of Sales, Andy Finch, commented that the company is delighted to have received permission for this latest landmark development which will be the first in the framework on Great Jackson Street and will create a new community at the southern gateway to the centre of Manchester city centre. The building services engineering was provided by WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff, whose Director, Ian Standring, believes that the approval of the plans for the Owen Street towers marks a real sign of confidence in the property market in Manchester, adding that the firm is excited to be working on the design team that will shape an iconic scheme for the city.

Read More »