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June 7, 2018

Landmark legal ruling over Llyn Padarn dispute

The Court of Appeal has made a landmark ruling in an environmental case concerning Llyn Padarn in Llanberis. It has dismissed an appeal by Seiont, Gwyrfai and Llyfni Anglers’ Society from the judgment of Mr Justice Hickinbottom on the meaning of “environmental damage” in the Environmental Liability

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Judge nixes affordable housing exemptions

A bid to exempt small developments from having to make affordable housing contributions has been quashed by the High Court. In a ruling handed down on Friday, the High Court ordered that the policy be removed from the government’s national planning practice guidance. Reading Borough Council and West Berkshire District

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Sheffield Sports Medicine Has Relocated

Sheffield Sports Medicine has invested £100k in a brand new clinic and it will take on 20 new staff as a result of the move. Established in 2009 and headed by Dr Michael Lee, a Consultant Physiotherapist in Sports and Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine, the clinic has relocated to Graves Health and

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Work on Sheffield Student Accommodation Has Started

A new 586-bed student accommodation scheme in Sheffield is to be delivered by ISG. The £33 million project is close to the two universities in Sheffield, fronting onto Ecclesall Road, and it is designed by developer Valeo. “We are delighted to partner with ISG to create our latest student community

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Pitchmaker Programme Helps Mace Group Expand

International consultancy and construction company Mace Group won pitches for contracts to the value of £175 million with the help of the highly-regarded UK Training specialist Kissing With Confidence. This success is an endorsement of the specialist’s outstanding Pitchmaker programme, an intensive and immersive challenge designed to help business winners

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Roads Need More Electricity: They Will Make It Themselves

That toll gate, street light and traffic monitoring system all need electricity. Later, roads that deice and charge vehicles at speed will need huge amounts of electricity. For now, electricity for road systems is provided by very expensive infrastructure to the grid except for a few solar/ wind street lights

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BDC 318 : Jul 2024

June 7, 2018

Landmark legal ruling over Llyn Padarn dispute

The Court of Appeal has made a landmark ruling in an environmental case concerning Llyn Padarn in Llanberis. It has dismissed an appeal by Seiont, Gwyrfai and Llyfni Anglers’ Society from the judgment of Mr Justice Hickinbottom on the meaning of “environmental damage” in the Environmental Liability Directive (ELD) and the Environmental Damage (Prevention and Remediation) (Wales) Regulations 2009 (the Regulations) at Llyn Padarn. Aaron & Partners, which represented Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water, said the case was the first to offer vital clarity on recent environmental legislation. The dispute dates back to 2012 when the Anglers’ Society made a complaint to environmental regulator Natural Resources Wales (NRW) that there had been environmental damage caused to Llyn Padarn. The source of the complaint was an algal bloom in 2009 that was attributable, in part, to phosphates in the water at the lake, which is a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) because of its unique species of arctic char. For years the lake has received treated wastewater discharged from the nearby village of Llanberis. In the modern era discharges have been regulated, with environmental permits becoming progressively stricter over time as to the levels of phosphates and other treatment by-products which may be discharged into the lake. Following the bloom, NRW issued a notification to Welsh Water under the regulations which was quashed by the High Court in 2012. NRW issued a second notification in 2015. The decision alleged a drop in water quality (since recovered) but did not find any damage to the arctic char or SSSI. NRW’s second notification was challenged by the Anglers’ Society, which claimed the regulator’s interpretation of environmental damage was too narrow. Welsh Water, First Hydro Company and Welsh ministers were joined as interested parties to the proceedings. Mr Justice Hickinbottom was asked to decide if, under the ELD, “environmental damage” was limited to deterioration in the existing environmental condition of the lake or also included the prevention or suppression of the improvement of the lake to standards of water quality set in European legislation. He ruled that “environmental damage” meant a deterioration from the existing baseline and did not include a deceleration of the improvement to the environmental condition of the lake. The Anglers’ Society appealed to the Court of Appeal. That appeal has been dismissed, with Lord Justice Lindblom agreeing with the original decision. He stated that the “baseline” before the damage occurs “is not set at some arbitrary date in the past, or at some arbitrary date in the future… it is deliberately fixed at the moment when the ‘damage’ occurs”. The ruling also stated that as the Anglers’ Society had not specified a broader interpretation of environmental damage in their 2012 complaint, NRW was not obliged to consider damage of a “novel and entirely different type than that notified” by the Society. “This case clarifies the meaning of environmental damage in respect of deterioration and impairment – as well as indicating the scope of the Regulations as applied to nationally designated sites such as SSSIs,” said Richard Forrester, partner at Aarons and an environmental law specialist. “It also highlights an important practical point about notification under the regulations where environmental damage is alleged. The appropriate authority is not required to assess the environmental damage on a broader basis than that notified by the complainant. “The Environmental Liability Directive has never before been tested in England and Wales – so this case is at the cutting edge of statutory interpretation in environmental law.” This article first appeared on wwtonline Source link

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Judge nixes affordable housing exemptions

A bid to exempt small developments from having to make affordable housing contributions has been quashed by the High Court. In a ruling handed down on Friday, the High Court ordered that the policy be removed from the government’s national planning practice guidance. Reading Borough Council and West Berkshire District Council had jointly asked the High Court to quash the planning guidance which said small developments did not need to include affordable housing. The two councils claimed that the policy would reduce the amount of affordable housing across the country by 20%. Judge David Holgate quashed the policy, which excluded developments of 10 homes or fewer, or 1,000 square metres or less, from the requirement to provide or contribute to affordable housing provision. In rural areas, a lower threshold of five homes would apply. Mr Justice Holgate ruled that the policy was “incompatible” with the statutory planning framework. The Department for Communities & Local Government has indicated that it will be seeking to appeal the decision. According to the Federation of Master Builders (FMB), the High Court decision will only make the housing shortage worse.  FMB chief executive Brian Berry said: “This decision threatens to accentuate the housing crisis by casting a dark cloud on small local builders at just the time when these firms are beginning to show signs of real growth. In the 1980s, there were more than 10,000 small and medium-sized (SME) house-builders in the UK building two thirds of all new homes. There are now fewer than 2,500 SME house-builders and between them they build less than one third of all new homes. The reasons for this decline are complex, but the burden of planning obligations which has been placed on small sites and added to over time, is a significant contributory factor to this.” He added: “This decision comes just at the point at which more and more sites are being subject to Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) charges. Taken together, this will push up demands on small house builders to unprecedented levels. Up until only a few years ago, planning guidance contained a national indicative minimum site size threshold of 15 dwellings for affordable contributions. As such, the government’s decision last year to move back to a 10-unit threshold is hardly an unreasonable step. Rather it recognised that the small firms which invariably build out small developments have proportionately higher costs and do not necessarily have the muscle or inclination to challenge local authority demands for affordable housing. The likely response is that they will avoid attempting to build on certain sites full stop and because of this, there will be less homes of all description.” Mr Berry concluded: “I would urge the government to stand its ground on the principle of the 10-unit threshold. It could seek to address reasonable concerns which some local authorities have – for instance, there could be some flexibility allowed to local authorities with a very high proportion of small sites. However, the government should strongly defend the principle of the exemption – it is not appropriate to impose the same level of obligations applied to large multi-million pound developments to the smallest of developments being brought forward by the smallest firms.” Barrister Jenny Wigley said the ruling would have an immediate effect on developers’ negotiations on small scale and brownfield sites. “Following this landmark judgment, the government has announced that the relevant paragraphs of the national planning practice guidance will be removed and this is now reflected on the NPPG website,” she said. “Accordingly, with immediate effect, developers will be unable to rely on those paragraphs in negotiations as to affordable housing and tariff style infrastructure contributions. The vacant building credit will also no longer be applicable.”                 This article was published on 4 Aug 2015 (last updated on 6 Aug 2015). Source link

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Jewers Doors Supplies Fast Acting Swift Doors for Nine New London Fire Brigade Stations

Category: Construction Industry Today | Subscribe to Construction Industry Today Feed Published Fri, Apr 1st 2016 Jewers Doors have just completed the installation of forty six Swift fast acting, bi-fold doors for nine new London Fire Brigade (LFB) stations under a £51.5 million Private Finance Initiative (PFI) project constructed by Blue3 consortium, comprising Kier and DIF Infrastructure. Posted via Industry Today. Follow us on Twitter @IndustryToday “LFB have been specifying bi-folding doors to all new and refurbishment projects for over 25 years, and Jewers have been supplying a large proportion of those projects, so Swift doors were first choice for Kier on this 28 year PFI project.” commented Mark Jewers, Director of Jewers Doors.  “The Swift door opens fully in less than 7 seconds, making them ideal for fire stations where appliances need to exit rapidly under ‘blue light’ emergency response conditions. That’s less than half the time it takes for typical vertical lifting doors to open.” Swift doors are designed with safety and security as standard.  Leading edges of the door are fitted with full height pressure sensitive edges, so if a door meets any resistance during closing, it immediately stops and reverses.  In addition, photocell beams inside and outside, create a safe area around the door which greatly reduces the risk of an impact ever occurring.  In the event of power failure, each door can be instantly and effortlessly opened by hand in around 2 seconds. Jewers added, “The sideways opening action and the large vision panel within each door leaf provides the fire appliance driver full visibility of the door position and the street outside, to exit the bay safety at all times.  With vertical lifting doors, it is difficult to judge when there is sufficient height clearance, and in an emergency situation, it’s not unknown for the appliance to hit the bottom of the door before it’s fully open, resulting in downtime, costly repairs to the door and often the fire engine.” Manufactured as a single piece construction, Swift door panels are fully insulated with CFC-free foam materials to optimise thermal efficiency and reduce noise pollution by 25dB. Options for partial or fully glazed doors are available. The new fire stations at Mitcham, Old Kent Road, Plaistow, Orpington and Dagenham are now in full service and the remaining four stations at Leytonstone, Shadwell, Purley and Dockhead are due for completion in early 2016. ends Editor NotesHi- res images available on request More about Jewers DoorsEstablished in 1983 and still a family run business, Jewers Doors is a world-leading supplier of industrial doors operating from a state-of-the-art facility in the heart of Bedfordshire. With over 50 highly skilled and experienced staff, the core of the business is design, manufacture, installation and repair of industrial door solutions across all industrial sectors. The Phoenix range of doors are designed for medium to large industrial applications, while the Esavian range is recognised as one of the world’s leading range of aircraft hanger doors.  Incorporating the very latest concepts and technologies, Jewers Doors have been installed not only in the UK, but also throughout the world including Europe, Middle and Far East and New Zealand.  Source link

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‘BACK TO BASICS APPROACH NEEDED TO IMPROVE ROAD OPERATIVE SAFETY’, SAYS AGGREGATE INDUSTRIES CONTRACTING

As the construction and road surfacing industry comes under pressure to reduce on-site accidents, Aggregate Industries’ Contracting Division has said that a ‘back to basics’ approach could be the key to improving site safety. With recent figures1 revealing that UK roads are the tenth most congested in the world, the role of the roadwork operatives, typically involving work on the live highways network, has become increasingly challenging. A previous study by Oxford University2 ranked it as the 16th most hazardous job in the UK, and Highways England estimates that 12 road workers have lost their lives on the network over the past 10 years.3 In response, there is an increased onus on all stakeholders from across the industry to take positive action to improve the health, safety and welfare of roadwork operatives – and while embracing new technological advancements has a part to play; Aggregate Industries says there is also a job to do in fixing the safety basics.   Paddy Murphy, Managing Director of Contracting Services at Aggregate Industries, commented: “While there is certainly a raft of new technologies on the market which can play a huge role in aiding the road operative safety plight, the reality is that there is also a big job to do in ensuring that our operatives abide to the basic safety measures. This begins with not only providing all workers with the correct task-based training and awareness of site risks, but by leaders providing a visible personal commitment to safety and leading by example.   “Site behaviours need to be monitored to ensure that everyone is adhering to current best practice by providing regular refresher sessions, as required. It sounds simple, but regardless of deadlines and pressures, it is vital that workers take the required rest-breaks and have access to adequate welfare facilities.   “Asides from site safety, it’s also about ensuring the health and wellbeing of staff. At Aggregate Industries, for example, our ‘Healthy You’ initiative provides workers with ongoing advice, guidance and support on how to deal with a variety of real health issues both in and outside of the workplace; from mental health and stress support, through to nutrition and fitness advice – all of which has been shown to help workers in their day-to-day.”   Whilst Highways England delivers a £15billion programme designed to improve the UK’s motorways and main A-roads as part of their Road Investment Strategy, the government has also committed £350 million to improving the UKs local roads.   Paddy added: “Amid hugely vast targets to improve Britain’s transport infrastructure, coupled with increased demand on our roads and levels of traffic, it has never been a more apt time for the industry to place a greater focus on the safety and wellbeing of staff than ever before. If we don’t get the safety basics right and iron out any issues now, the reality is that we may encounter even bigger issues down the line as pressures and workloads increase.”   For further information about Aggregate Industries, visit www.aggregate.com.  

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Sheffield Sports Medicine Has Relocated

Sheffield Sports Medicine has invested £100k in a brand new clinic and it will take on 20 new staff as a result of the move. Established in 2009 and headed by Dr Michael Lee, a Consultant Physiotherapist in Sports and Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine, the clinic has relocated to Graves Health and Sports Centre in the Norton area of the city. Sheffield Sports Medicine specialises in Sports Medicine, Physiotherapy, Rehabilitation, Podiatry, Sports Psychology, Sports Massage and Sports Science. Its new clinic was officially opened by Kate Allatt, who was rehabilitated by Dr Lee after she survived a huge brain stem stroke and subsequent locked-in syndrome in 2010. “It was an honour to have Kate come ‘home’ and officially open our new clinic. There’s something extremely poignant about Kate returning to open our new premises,” said Dr Lee. “This new clinic will help us take a giant leap forward into a new era, and further enhance the award-winning service which we offer to clients. It’s a significant investment for a business of our size but a necessary one, too. This is a fantastic opportunity to display and develop our forward-thinking mentality to execute life-changing treatments to all of the patients that we meet. We’re so excited about what the future holds,” he added. Kate suffered a massive brain stem stroke in February 2010 and was told by doctors that she would never walk, talk or even swallow again. However, she became the first person in history to make full recovery from locked-in syndrome and credits Dr Lee for her recovery and rehabilitation. “When I got the call to ask if I wanted to come and open Sheffield Sports Medicine’s new clinic it was a no-brainer. Mike (Lee) gave me a new lease of life,” said Kate. “The mindset I had after the pure chance meeting with Mike – an incredible meeting – I now invoke and pass on around the world. I couldn’t have wished for a better place to spend my birthday – Mike helped create the ‘new me’. Sheffield Sports Medicine is going to go from strength to strength.”

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Work on Sheffield Student Accommodation Has Started

A new 586-bed student accommodation scheme in Sheffield is to be delivered by ISG. The £33 million project is close to the two universities in Sheffield, fronting onto Ecclesall Road, and it is designed by developer Valeo. “We are delighted to partner with ISG to create our latest student community building in Sheffield. Our staff is excited about bringing Valeo’s new brand of student experience to the thriving city of Sheffield,” said Peter Haspel, Managing Director of Valeo Management. The 14-storey building will include high-specification and spacious communal facilities, as well as a central club lounge with extensive balcony on the ninth floor overlooking the city, along with a lounge and study space, a café, private dining, cinema and gym. Accommodation is configured around four, five and six bed clusters, as well as a number of studio apartments – all with en-suite facilities. Each bedroom will also benefit from advanced technologies, such as super-fast Wi-Fi available in all rooms. The demolition of an existing garage structure on the site has already been concluded by ISG and the firm is now set to begin building the concrete frame building, featuring traditional masonry with brick feature panels to its façade. In addition, the contractor will also create car parking spaces for seven retail units, which will occupy the ground floor of the new building. “The global popularity of our higher education institutions sees demand at record levels for places and high-quality student accommodation at our top universities. Purpose-built student residential facilities play a hugely important role in the overall housing mix within our cities, and this major project signifies that Valeo has ambitious development plans across the UK,” said Tim Harvey, Regional Director for ISG. The scheme is expected to approach completion in summer 2019.

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Pitchmaker Programme Helps Mace Group Expand

International consultancy and construction company Mace Group won pitches for contracts to the value of £175 million with the help of the highly-regarded UK Training specialist Kissing With Confidence. This success is an endorsement of the specialist’s outstanding Pitchmaker programme, an intensive and immersive challenge designed to help business winners make the right emotional connection with the toughest of audiences. Mace Group’s business wins is the latest accomplishment in a period of rapid expansion for Kissing With Confidence, which has built a client portfolio that includes major banks, household name companies, Big Four firms and government departments. “Quantifying effect is a classic issue in training and the fact that Mace Group can identify £175 million of business which it has gained through our programmes is a major accolade,” said Russell Wardrop, co-founder and chief executive of Kissing With Confidence. “Nobody can guarantee that a client will win every pitch but Kissing With Confidence’s Pitchmaker programme has helped to gain business amounting to billions of pounds over the years.” Mace Group is currently a £1.97 billion company, operating in 21 sectors, such as higher education, from five global hubs. It has a concentrated focus on championing its people, whether as individuals or in teams. “There is no question we would not be where we are today as a business without the work Kissing With Confidence has done on our pitches. The results speak volumes,” said Terry Spraggett, business unit director at Mace Group. “There is a process, but it’s more than that. By the end of the session there is clarity, confidence and creativity.” “The hardest thing in the biggest pitches is deciding how robust to be, agreeing the line, then holding that line consistently from beginning to end. Kissing With Confidence facilitates that effortlessly, dealing assertively with the biggest of egos,” Terry added. “Then there is the skill in putting it all together, with an arm round the shoulder for some and a kick up the backside for others. Kissing With Confidence reaches out to everyone and makes them believe, especially those tasked with opening and closing.” Kissing With Confidence employs 12 people and it specialises in inspiring future leaders and developing effective and committed teams. It recently has embarked on a major sales growth campaign with the aim of taking turnover to £1.5 million.

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Roads Need More Electricity: They Will Make It Themselves

That toll gate, street light and traffic monitoring system all need electricity. Later, roads that deice and charge vehicles at speed will need huge amounts of electricity. For now, electricity for road systems is provided by very expensive infrastructure to the grid except for a few solar/ wind street lights in China and Korea for example. However, as more and more capabilities are added to roads instead of simply covering a country with extra roads, they are starting to make their own electricity, notably as solar road surface but then with added silent wind turbines, photovoltaic verges and barriers and more. There is also highly speculative work in the USA and UK on garnering power from road surface movement using piezoelectrics and electrodynamics and even its heat. China plans to create an intelligent transport system by 2030. The country hopes to build smart roads that will not only be able to charge electric cars as they drive but also monitor temperature, traffic flow and weight load using artificial intelligence. Indeed, like France, the Netherlands and the USA it already has trials of extended lengths of solar road which cost no more than regular roads. In an alternative approach, vehicles go under tunnels of solar panels that also support lighting, light-emitting signage and monitoring equipment using the electricity made where it is needed. See the IDTechEx Research report, “Electrically Smart Roads 2018-2028” for more. Raghu Das, CEO of IDTechEx says, “The spiral vertical axis wind turbines VAWT in Asia rarely rotate because they are too low but much higher versions are planned on large UK roadside vehicle charging centres that should work well. H shaped VAWT is also gaining traction – much slower and quieter than the propeller shape which vibrates and keeps you awake at night in an urban area. The price gap between the ubiquitous polycrystalline silicon solar cell and the much more efficient single crystal silicon is narrowing. That means that road furniture such as bus shelters and smart gantries will likely go for more solar rather than adding wind power in many cases because wind power needs a lot of maintenance and its price is not dropping as rapidly.” The IDTechEx Research report, “Off Grid Electric Vehicle Charging: Zero Emission 2018-2028” analyses that aspect. The prototype of a smart road is already in place on an expressway outside of Jinan, providing better traffic updates as well as more accurate mapping. Verizon’s IoT division has launched a project around intelligent asphalt, which it thinks has the potential to significantly reduce fossil fuel emissions and save time by reducing up to 44% of traffic backups. It has partnered with Sacramento, California, to test this theory. “By embedding sensors into the pavement as well as installing cameras on traffic lights, we will be able to study and analyze the flow of traffic. Then, we will take all of that data and use it to optimize the timing of lights so that traffic flows easier and travel times are shorter,” explains Sean Harrington, vice president of Verizon Smart Communities. Colorado’s Department of Transportation has recently announced its intention to be the first state to pilot smart roads by striking a five-year deal with a smart road company to test the technology. Like planned auto-deicing roads elsewhere, the aim of this project is, first and foremost, to save lives. The technology will detect when a car suddenly leaves a road and send emergency assistance to the area. The IDTechEx Research report “Electrically Smart Roads 2018-2028” describes how others work on real time structural monitoring of roads and embedded interactive lighting and road surface signage. “Smart pavement can make that determination and send that information directly into a vehicle,” Peter Kozinski, director of CDOT’s RoadX division, tells the Denver Post. “Data is the new asphalt of transportation.” Sensors, processors and other technology are embedded in the Colorado road to extend capability beyond accidents and reach into better road maintenance. Fast adoption relies on the ability to rapidly install sensor-laden pavement or lay concrete slabs. Attention therefore turns to fast adaptation of existing roads. Indeed, even for the heavy coil arrays used for dynamic vehicle charging, in Israel there are machines that can retrofit into the road surface at a remarkable two kilometres of cut and insert in a day. “It’s hard to imagine that these things are inexpensive, with all the electronics in them,” Charles Schwartz, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Maryland, tells the Denver Post concerning the vehicle sensing project, “but CDOT is a fairly sophisticated agency, and this is an interesting pilot project. We can learn a lot, even if the test is only partially successful.” On 19-21 June IDTechEx are hosting the Business & Technology Insight Forums in Cambridge, UK. These detailed but concise sessions hosted by experts will give the latest insights on Off-Grid Electricity Generation, New Off Grid Energy Harvesting Technologies and more. Learn more and register at www.IDTechEx.com/Cambridge.

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BUREAU VERITAS LOBBIES DUTYHOLDERS TO STEP UP ‘SAFETY FIRST’ APPROACH AHEAD OF 18th EDITION REGS

With little under a month to go until the highly-anticipated 18th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations come into force, Bureau Veritas is calling on duty holders to step up efforts aimed at reducing the safety risk posed by poor electrics. Due to be published in July, BS 7671 – IET Wiring Regulations 18th edition will apply to all new and rewired installations designed after January 2019. The legislation is set to include a number of significant changes in relation to protection against fire, protection against overvoltages and clarity on special location installations, in a bid to optimise safety in domestic, industrial and commercial locations. The more stringent standards will look to address the risks presented by faulty electrical installations and wiring systems, after estimates show that electricity is the leading cause of over 20,000 accidental fires in the UK each year1. In the run up to implementation, global certification firm Bureau Veritas is urging all duty holders to review their existing electrical safety standards and intensify their ‘safety first’ approach to compliance. Nathan Cliff, electrical principal engineer for electrical systems at Bureau Veritas, said: “With poor electrical installations still responsible for five accidents in the UK every single day, it’s no surprise the 18th Edition will force us as an industry to place a greater emphasis on the protection of people. “For duty holders, our advice is clear – do not wait until the regulations take hold to take action. Instead, start by reviewing existing electrical safety protocols to ensure they take a ‘safety first’ approach to protecting employees, students and residents so that best practice is achieved every step of the way.” According to Bureau Veritas, one important aspect for duty holders to consider is that the 18th edition puts a greater onus on a risk assessment when it comes to protection against transient overvoltage (e.g. lightning) required for buildings to protect against the risk of fires and loss of supply. In addition, protection must be provided for high risk and sensitive locations, such as medical locations, heritage buildings, banks, IT centres etc. Nathan adds: “For many, these new regulations will no doubt be hard to decipher and put into practice. However, it’s literally a matter of life and death for duty holders to get to grips with these reforms as soon as they can as achieving compliance now ahead of the January 2019 deadline will, ultimately, help to save lives.” To find out more about Bureau Veritas please call 0345 600 1828 or email info@uk.bureauveritas.com. Alternatively, please visit www.bureauveritas.co.uk

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New Biomass Boiler turned on at Glastonbury DC to improve carbon emissions

Snows Glastonbury DC unveiled their new Biomass Boiler this week. We sell over 1000 products and some require milling to meet product specifications. Our Glastonbury site has the facility to complete this process, which can produce off-cuts of wood. These off-cuts are a valuable fuel and will be used for the new renewable energy source. The system provides a whole range of benefits including; Reducing Carbon Emissions: The Biomass boiler produces a fraction of carbon emissions that fossil fuels make, and releases contemporary carbons back into the environment meaning carbon levels are consistent and sustainable. Improving efficiency This modern technology operates at 90% efficiency which is vastly higher than conventional boilers. Producing a renewable energy The energy created by the boiler will be re-distributed back into the site and used for power & lighting. Financial benefit The boiler presents key financial benefits, including a £12,000 government payback scheme, which will be re-invested into the site to improve efficiencies even further.

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