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October 17, 2018

SIKA SUPPLIES SEAMLESS, NON-SLIP FLOOR SOLUTION FOR TOWN AQUARIUM.

For the refurbishment of a popular visitor attraction, the client required a single flooring solution that helped maintain the highest health and safety standards, and enhanced the aesthetics of its exotic exhibits. The seamless, non-slip Sika ComfortFloor® PS-24 system proved ideal for the project. Blue Planet Aquarium in Ellesmere Port,

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Are Construction Companies Missing Out On Brand Equity?

Branding used to be about developing the perfect logo or slogan for your business, and while these things are still important, today’s marketing experts take a different view. The prevailing wisdom now is that branding is mostly concerned with how your brand is perceived on a gut level. Does the

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Kite Packaging’s challenge to reduce plastic usage by 120 tonnes is supported by its plastic focused white paper and mobile packaging test facility

UK based company, Kite Packaging, has launched its sustainable future plastics initiative to reduce plastic levels with the unveiling of its new mobile packaging test facility and the release of their white paper. With the increasing focus on plastics and the harmful impact on the environment, businesses and consumers across

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Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

October 17, 2018

SIKA SUPPLIES SEAMLESS, NON-SLIP FLOOR SOLUTION FOR TOWN AQUARIUM.

For the refurbishment of a popular visitor attraction, the client required a single flooring solution that helped maintain the highest health and safety standards, and enhanced the aesthetics of its exotic exhibits. The seamless, non-slip Sika ComfortFloor® PS-24 system proved ideal for the project. Blue Planet Aquarium in Ellesmere Port, Cheshire is home to Europe’s largest collection of sharks, as well as a host of stunning sea-life such as rays, otters and tortoises. Due to the differing floor finishes throughout the attraction’s ‘Venom’ display area, the client required a single flooring solution that made for a clearer, lessconfusing viewing experience for visitors. The new floor had to offer high levels of slip resistance on account of over-spray from a nearby cascading waterfall feature creating wet surface areas, hence the specification of Sika ComfortFloor® PS-24, a tough, solvent-free, polyurethane, seamless system. Contractor, Mike Thelwell Flooring, was selected to install the new surface, which had to be built-up in places to correct the removed floor’s differing heights. As well as its robust resistance to heavy footfall and slippage – even when flooring becomes wet – Sika ComfortFloor® PS-24’s decorative properties were crucial to its specification. It is available in a wide range of bespoke colours to suit all environments, with the client choosing a two-tone effect to create an ‘earthy’ feel in the aquarium’s Venom area. The system’s seamless aspect provided another appealing feature, as it makes the flooring simple to clean and hygiene standards easier to uphold in busy, commercial spaces. Mike Thelwell, Director at Mike Thelwell Flooring, said: “The project was complex and specific to the client’s requirements, but Sika ComfortFloor® PS-24 ensured challenges were easily overcome. We worked closely with Sika and the client to ensure the surface was fitted within the agreed timeframe. We are extremely proud of the floor we’ve provided for this popular attraction. Our team’s installation skills, in conjunction with Sika’s superb floor system, made for a very successful project.” With the Sika ComfortFloor® PS-24 system, which comprises Sikafloor®-3000 and Sikafloor®-300, two-part elastic, aliphatic, low-VOC, self-smoothing polyurethane resins, the aquarium has been furnished with a surface that looks as good as it performs. Non-slip, smooth and stylish, the new floor succeeds on many levels, helping enhance the visitor experience for the many thousands of people who cross the attraction’s threshold throughout the year.

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Are Construction Companies Missing Out On Brand Equity?

Branding used to be about developing the perfect logo or slogan for your business, and while these things are still important, today’s marketing experts take a different view. The prevailing wisdom now is that branding is mostly concerned with how your brand is perceived on a gut level. Does the mention of a particular brand make you feel happy, safe, indifferent, annoyed or amused? Subconscious positive associations are a powerful tool, especially for construction companies. What if the mere mention of your company could carry an automatic connotation of reliable, high quality, professional construction work? What if the brand equity of your firm could make your customers believe that your company was the obvious, go-to choice for all building contracts? What is brand equity? Brand equity is essentially the concept that a familiar brand will have an advantage over lesser-known competitors due to its customers conflating recognition with quality. Faced with two or more purchase options, the vast majority of consumers will assume that the brand or service they’ve heard of has a reputation for superiority – and there are few industries where perceived low quality is as harmful as construction. Brand equity is related to the psychological cognitive bias called the “halo effect” – the tendency of most people to make strong unconscious assumptions based on unrelated information. For example, studies show that many of us subconsciously assume that attractive and well-dressed people have positive character traits such as kindness and good humour. In branding jargon, the term “halo effect” also has another meaning tied to brand equity – the propensity of a customer to assume that a good experience with one product or item reflects on the entire brand. If you’ve had good experiences with a Samsung phone, chances are you’ll be more likely to assume that their TVs are good, too. This latter definition is less cognitive bias and more common sense, but the message is clear: brand equity can be a powerful asset for putting your business on a pedestal in the customer’s mind. Developing brand equity in construction  The first step, of course, is to make sure your company really does deliver high quality, dependable construction services! If you get a reputation for second-rate construction work, the customers are going to catch on and stop calling, as your business name will become a byword for poor results (this is known as negative brand equity). If you consistently do great work your company will naturally start to develop a reputation for excellence, with a large roster of happy clients and a website overflowing with positive testimonials – but you still need to make sure people have heard of you. An important facet of brand equity is brand recognition. Faced with the choice between a Superdry jacket, or a no-brand coat from a market stall, most people would prefer the familiar brand with its presumed higher quality. In order to leverage this principle, then, you need a widely recognised name. For a construction business, this needn’t be at Coca Cola and Burger King levels of public familiarity. Rather than trying to become a household name for the general public (which would be both unnecessary and nearly impossible), the goal is to become very well-known in certain circles and selected groups. By targeting your marketing efforts at those specific people you want to work with, you can position yourself as the go-to contractor for building work. Clarifying your business values  Brand awareness is a little different of a concept to brand familiarity, although closely related. Whereas brand familiarity means that people recognise your name, brand awareness means that they understand something about who you are and what you do (and what sets you apart from your competitors). Recognising the name Apple is one thing; knowing that they are an electronics company with a focus on innovative design is another. It’s important for any company’s branding that they stand for something, and construction contractors are no different. Do your customers know what your core business values are? Brand awareness is about making sure that they do. Whether you want your message to be that you’re passionate about construction site safety, or that you care about the environment and sustainability, you should seek to clarify your specific ideology. Getting the marketing message out As well as the normal marketing channels – cold communications with potential clients, social media, search engine optimisation and so on – an oft-overlooked marketing opportunity is the hoardings that are legally required to envelop large construction sites in public areas. Why not use these giant boards to communicate something about your brand and your values to the public? The use of large printed hoardings can plant your business name in the minds of hundreds of people who might later not even remember where they saw it – but could cause them to recognise it if they should later look for a construction contractor to help them with a project. Hoardings can essentially be a giant billboards to advertise your firm and its ethos, and by leaving them blank you could be missing out on a great opportunity to develop your brand equity. It’s not unheard of for truly artistic and creative construction hoardings to become something of a tourist attraction in their own right (such as the “melting building” hoarding that was erected in Paris in 2007), so don’t be afraid to go all-out with something bold. In the end, making the most of brand equity could be the key to securing larger contracts and ensuring your construction company is always in demand. Taking the time to consider how your brand is perceived by customers and leverage the power of brand recognition could give you a significant advantage over your competitors. ———- This post was contributed by PressOn, one of the UK’s leading large format digital printers. In addition to producing construction hoarding graphics, they also provide large format prints and banners for some of the UK’s leading retailers and brands.

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Kite Packaging’s challenge to reduce plastic usage by 120 tonnes is supported by its plastic focused white paper and mobile packaging test facility

UK based company, Kite Packaging, has launched its sustainable future plastics initiative to reduce plastic levels with the unveiling of its new mobile packaging test facility and the release of their white paper. With the increasing focus on plastics and the harmful impact on the environment, businesses and consumers across the country are searching for viable solutions to build a sustainable, circular economy. When it comes to the environment, it is particularly difficult to change our behaviour. In order to help raise awareness across the UK, the Kite team have challenged themselves and their customers to reduce their plastic usage by a huge 120 tonnes by the end of 2019. Kite’s white paper provides businesses and consumers with an essential guide to plastic packaging and offers new alternatives to help people across the country in building a circular economy. The Kite team’s new, fully equipped truck is a mobile testing and demonstration facility in which their packaging technologists can carry out waste minimising packaging audits to determine how plastic packaging can be reduced, as well as offering more eco-friendly packing alternatives. The employee-owned business announced the challenge earlier this month when the team held a plastic packaging conference in the Midlands, at which they launched both the truck and their plastics white paper. For a multitude of businesses, packaging is a substantial part of their day-to-day operation, but often companies are using excess amounts of plastics and are not looking for eco-friendly alternatives. Kite can help businesses explore a range of alternatives to traditional plastic based packaging. Their mobile testing facility enables the scientific analysis and testing of current packing operation whilst incorporating a full suite of alternative packaging systems and solutions. Gavin Ashe, Managing Partner at Kite Packaging said: “Everyone in business is fantastically busy, focusing on running their business and packaging often ends up an afterthought. So we have invested in our mobile test facility to take the solutions directly to the customer, where we can demonstrate, design and even test solutions at the customer’s factory, saving every one time and money. “We really are a packaging company who want you to use less packaging. Join us in saving 120 tonnes of packaging waste this year.” For further information on how to reduce your plastics use, please view our white paper (kitepackaging.co.uk/images/pdf/plastic-white-paper.pdf)

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