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July 12, 2019

Stunning stadium given fire protection

Sherwin-Williams coatings were chosen for the fire protection of steelwork at Tottenham Hotspur’s new showpiece stadium where up to 62,000 fans will be seated for the club’s home games. Having examined the priorities to protect the steel structure in the event of a fire with such large numbers of people

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BDC 318 : Jul 2024

July 12, 2019

Opinion: We must work together to prevent occupational lung disease

Have you ever sat in a taxi, on a train, or on a bus next to or close to someone who has a rasping cough and seems to struggle for breath? An early thought that comes to mind, despite you trying not to be judgemental, might be, “oh, that must be a smoker”. But, what if their cough is unrelated to smoking and is instead a result of diligently working all their life while exposed to substances, dusts and vapours that have been harmful to their health, particularly their respiratory system? In this scenario their rasping cough or breathing problems are a grim result of workplace exposure to these life-threatening substances; due to a lack of care or thought by some of their employers – or maybe a lack of knowledge or awareness themselves – they are now suffering from the consequences. Now is an apt time to raise awareness of respiratory workplace matters, re-evaluate your safe systems of work, and maybe introduce some new initiatives. The Health and Safety Executive has just launched a ‘Dustbuster’ inspection campaign from 17 June to 12 July across the UK. This campaign concentrates on industries such as construction, woodworking and food manufacturing where occupational lung diseases, including in some cases occupational cancers, are more common. During the campaign, inspectors will be visiting businesses across the country to see what measures have been put in place to protect workers’ lungs from the likes of asbestos and silica. The effects of these carcinogens and others on our health can develop over a long latency period, and because of this it isn’t always immediately apparent when workers are at risk during their day-to-day work. It is vital organisations have measures in place to ensure exposure does not occur and take preventative steps. The HSE’s ‘Dustbuster’ campaign is closely aligned with IOSH’s No Time to Lose (NTTL) campaign to help businesses take action against causes of occupational cancer. NTTL campaign phases have covered the dangers of silica dust and asbestos exposure and many organisations have pledged to support the campaign, most recently Co-op property. Both No Time to Lose and #Dustbuster contribute to increasing knowledge about the causes of occupational cancer and offer resources to help organisations and businesses to take action to reduce workplace exposure. Whether you’re an employer or employee, industry body or policy-maker, safety and health professional or occupational hygienist, we all have a part to play if we want to call time on work-caused cancers. Thousands of people die from work-related lung diseases every year, in many cases due to exposures that took place many years before. In the working environment – as managers or workers – we all have the power do something about this. Get involved by reading the free materials available from https://bit.ly/2IlG86M and asking what your workplace is doing or is prepared to do to tackle occupational cancers. Also consider joining the growing number of businesses leading on this issue and sign up to the No Time to Lose pledge: www.notimetolose.org.uk/get-involved/pledge-take-action/ and show your support for the latest HSE #DustBuster inspection campaign. It is important to involve others, start discussions, raise awareness. Don’t walk away – ignoring the issue affects everyone in the long-run. We must work together; only through our combined efforts can we prevent the horrendous effects of occupational lung disease. • More information about the HSE Dustbuster campaign is available on the HSE website: https://campaigns.hse.gov.uk/hgbww/resources/dustbusters/?utm_source=Partners&utm_medium=Email-CL&utm_campaign=Dustbuster19 • If you are supporting the activity please use the #Dustbuster and #WorkRight hashtags so HSE can recognise your support.

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Stunning stadium given fire protection

Sherwin-Williams coatings were chosen for the fire protection of steelwork at Tottenham Hotspur’s new showpiece stadium where up to 62,000 fans will be seated for the club’s home games. Having examined the priorities to protect the steel structure in the event of a fire with such large numbers of people moving about, Sherwin-Williams experts selected FIRETEX C69 Epoxy blast primer, followed by FIRETEX FX2003 solvent-based intumescent coating with a top coat of Acrolon C237 acrylic urethane sheen finish. The Sherwin-Williams Macropoxy C123 coating was used for the surface below the second synthetic pitch, achieving low curing down to 5°C. The coating is easy to apply by airless spray; compatible with a wide range of Macropoxy, zinc clad epoxy primers and build coats; and compliant with Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) standards. Steel fabricator for the project was Severfield. “This project demanded the highest specification standards for stadia using only the best products. We’re proud to have been involved to ensure only the highest levels of fire protection measures are in place where the lives of people and the safety of property are at stake,” said Mark Lockhart, Sherwin-Williams UK Sales Manager. Macropoxy C400V3 epoxy zinc phosphate coating was selected and applied after blast cleaning of the terrace steelwork, a system suitable for the protection of steelwork in a range of exposure environments from C1 to C5 as defined in ISO12944, including buildings, car parks, petrochemical plants, breweries and power stations. Projects using fire and corrosion protection coatings delivered by Sherwin-Williams across EMEAI include London’s The Shard, Azerbaijan’s Flame Towers and the Leadenhall Building, known as The Cheesegrater. For more information see the Sherwin-Williams website.

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