BDC

Search
BDC Magazine

October 14, 2021

Skills crunch keeping contractors awake at night

Rising costs and a shortage of skilled people are giving building services contractors sleepless nights, according to a new business survey. Members of the Building Engineering Services Association (BESA) said they were facing “major challenges” due to a combination of rising labour and material costs, growing lead times, shortage of

Read More »

Waterloo Strengthen Product Offering with Displacement

Waterloo have strengthened their product offering by replacing their displacement range with the full portfolio of Swegon displacement products. By integrating a range of airborne products from the Swegon group, the supplier of air terminal devices can deliver the widest range of room unit products in the UK market.    The new range of displacement terminals are made to effectively

Read More »

Greener homes pilot scheme underway

Senior members of Kirklees Council were out in Huddersfield to inspect work on a housing retrofit pilot project. The pilot is a demonstration of the council’s commitment to a carbon neutral Kirklees and shows how existing housing can be retrofitted to reduce carbon improve the warmth and comfort of residents.

Read More »
New Extension Creates 90 More Places at Bleak Hill Primary School

New Extension Creates 90 More Places at Bleak Hill Primary School

Work has concluded on a multi-phase project to provide space for 90 more pupils at Bleak Hill Primary School in Windle, St Helens. The £2.5 million project began in October 2019 and took place over two phases, with contractor Seddon working throughout the various coronavirus lockdown measures to deliver the

Read More »

Kingspan Data & Flooring Technology Achieves Cradle to Cradle Certified® Bronze

Kingspan Data & Flooring Technology, the industry leader in data and flooring solutions, has achieved Cradle to Cradle Certified® bronze for their key raised access flooring solutions, based on an impartial and independent evaluation of material health, material reutilisation, renewable energy, water stewardship and social fairness. Cradle to Cradle Certified®

Read More »

RoSPA Health and Safety Awards 2022 are now open for registration

After a bumper 2021, when nearly 2,000 entries from 49 countries were received, the RoSPA Health and Safety Awards 2022 are now open for registrations. As well as offering non-competitive achievement awards – in which Gold, Silver, Bronze and Merits are awarded – entrants can bid to be crowned the

Read More »

Things to Consider When Choosing Concrete Formwork for Construction

The concrete’s properties can affect the formwork and the entire project. That is why it is critical to understand the concrete’s characteristics. In Brisbane, concrete is one of the most often utilized building materials. This is because it combines strength, durability, and lifespan with affordability and flexibility, to name a

Read More »

Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

October 14, 2021

WORLD’S FIRST ONE-STOP SUSTAINABILITY PLATFORM LAUNCHES TO HELP UK BUSINESSES REACH NET ZERO BY 2030

Businesses are being encouraged to sign up and begin reducing emissions today A new sustainability platform, Zellar, has launched to enable every UK small business to reach Net Zero by 2030, well ahead of government targets. This one-stop-shop brings together everything businesses need to get to Net Zero and more in one easy-to-use platform. Zellar makes sustainability an accessible and affordable reality for small businesses across the UK, offering a range of services from local biodiversity projects, to options for adopting green technology or energy. It brings together all the services SMEs from sole traders to medium sized organisations need to benchmark, manage, offset and promote their sustainability journey. Zellar provides the most efficient pathway to Net Zero, and costs from just £125 per year on a subscription basis. The company is also working with like-minded partners to provide the products and services SMEs need to become Net Zero businesses before 2030. These include: CCP, Coop Bank, Renault Mobilize, Onto, SSE, Tatton Estates and Biffa.   Various LEPS are actively supporting their business communities and closely collaborating with Zellar in the coming months. Small and medium-sized enterprises make up 99.9% of all UK businesses and employ 60% of the workforce. Yet, 78% don’t know where to start to become more sustainable.* Whether businesses are just getting started or want more ways to improve, Zellar can help benchmark their sustainability and provide a customised roadmap.  By signing up, businesses will:  Help to combat the devastating effects of climate change Embrace Net Zero best practice by reducing your emissions as much as practical and offset the rest Attract the best talent in your business by showing you care about the things that matter Generate more customers and prospects as more consumers and supply chains buy from green businesses Grow your profits by transitioning to green suppliers and energy Support UK local green initiatives and encourage others to do the same – we’re all in this together Become a sustainable business, which is good for profits, customers and the climate Gary Styles, Zellar’s CEO and founder, says: “Like many parents, I worry about my children’s future in the face of the climate crisis. There’s plenty of talk but not enough action so I created Zellar to help businesses make real changes internally through reducing emissions, volunteering, behaviour change, contributing to biodiversity projects and offsetting. We’ve already helped over 50 early-access businesses significantly improve their sustainability process and we’re excited to reach thousands more companies across the UK.” Peter Charlesworth, Zellar’s COO, says “We understand that businesses face a lot of challenges in trying to reach Net Zero and it’s not always easy to know where to start. That’s why we created Zellar. While big companies often have departments dedicated to sustainability, until now small companies would have had to rely on several different consultants, brokers and apps, which is time consuming and doesn’t guarantee success. But small businesses will make a huge difference and you can’t solve climate issues without them.” Stewart Davies, COO of GG Hospitality, owners of the Stock Exchange Hotel which has a Zellar profile, says: “Over the years I’ve become increasingly aware of how I can take steps to become more sustainable and this is really important for our management of the Stock Exchange Hotel. We used Zellar to analyse our carbon emissions and discovered they are 44% better than the average UK hotel. The platform also provided a series of actions we can take to improve this further, including behavioural actions, emission reductions by moving to a low carbon energy supplier, use of green technology, offsetting and biodiversity investments. We’re excited about our next steps towards becoming a greener hotel and are committed to reaching Net Zero before 2030.” Zellar has been in development for two years and 30 Manchester-based businesses have already had early access. The platform is now available to businesses across the UK. For more information and to sign up, visit: https://zellar.com/ 

Read More »

Skills crunch keeping contractors awake at night

Rising costs and a shortage of skilled people are giving building services contractors sleepless nights, according to a new business survey. Members of the Building Engineering Services Association (BESA) said they were facing “major challenges” due to a combination of rising labour and material costs, growing lead times, shortage of equipment and delivery delays. Many respondents said they expected the situation to get worse before it gets better, although 80% said they expected to see growing or stable turnover levels through to the end of the year. There is a particular shortage of m&e engineers, pipe fitters, plumbers, and service technicians, according to BESA members responding to the quarterly survey, which is carried out in partnership with the Electrical Contractors Association (ECA), the Scottish Electrical Trade Body (SELECT) and the Scottish and Northern Ireland Plumbing Employer’s Federation (SNIPEF). The survey, which covered the three months from April to June and asked business owners to look ahead at their prospects for the rest of the year, found that small firms are facing particular challenges. Recruiting 41% reported problems recruiting the staff they needed to keep projects going. 66% expected the situation to deteriorate during the current quarter and 13% expected the situation to remain the same. However, 32% of survey respondents did say they expected to see some improvement before the end of the year. One fallout from the current crisis is that many businesses will employ fewer direct staff, agency workers and apprentices over the next six months despite the urgent need to increase the flow of skilled people into the industry. “That is probably the most worrying message from the survey,” said BESA’s director of legal and commercial Debbie Petford. “We already have a serious skills shortage across construction and related sectors like building engineering, but it seems some employers are reacting by pulling in their recruitment horns. “This will only serve to build up longer term shortages. Without a large enough and suitably skilled workforce we will not be able to deliver on the government’s decarbonisation plans or keep the economic recovery on track. This is a global issue and I hope it will be high on the agenda at next month’s COP26 climate conference in Glasgow,” she added. www.theBESA.com

Read More »

Scientists upgrade an old practice to offer new low carbon building material

Plymouth University is piloting the use of an ancient building material called cob to construct a new generation of energy-efficient homes. They have started building a single storey 32-square-metre lab and classroom next to the university’s sustainability hub out of the material which is a mix of soil, water, straw and hemp. Principal investigator and professor of environmental building at the art, design and architecture school Steve Goodhew said: “We will create a living lab and demonstration site that will become the centre of attention for a wide range of people – from construction professionals to built environment students.” Contractor Chris Noakes and the university’s estates team are expected to complete the building in eight months. Researchers will monitor the performance of the new walling material using sensors to measure energy use, its life cycle and indoor air quality. The results will be shared with future building designers, contractors and interested stakeholders. Research set to influence industry The University’s Sustainable Earth Institute director Professor Will Blake said: “Students and visitors to the site will be able to engage with this potentially industry-influencing ongoing research project.” Interreg V France (Channel) England and the European Regional Development Fund have invested more than £3.5m in the second phase of the CobBauge project where a full-sized building will also be constructed in France. The first phase developed a new method of using cob that reduced the need for heating and mitigated overheating during warmer weather. Researchers studied a range of different soil and fibre mixes creating a double-layered composite wall combining a denser mix with a lighter weight version for strength and insulation. Brokers Hank Zarihs Associates said lenders were interested in the science of greener materials and were keen to offer construction loans to developers using low carbon emission products. Tokyo University researchers announced recently that they had developed a new form of concrete that can reduce emissions from the construction industry. Calcium carbonate concrete is made from waste concrete and carbon dioxide from the air or industrial exhaust gases. It shows promise as a future construction material, especially in places where natural resources are limited.

Read More »

Waterloo Strengthen Product Offering with Displacement

Waterloo have strengthened their product offering by replacing their displacement range with the full portfolio of Swegon displacement products. By integrating a range of airborne products from the Swegon group, the supplier of air terminal devices can deliver the widest range of room unit products in the UK market.    The new range of displacement terminals are made to effectively discharge air at low velocity to ensure good comfort in rooms. In large spaces such as airports, theatres, factory floors, open offices, and supermarkets where a traditional mixed system can fall short; using a displacement system can have significant advantages on indoor air quality and efficiency.    Rooms with high ceilings can benefit from substantial energy savings by installing the displacement terminals with Varizon®, as only the occupied zone needs to be cooled from the low level of displacement installation.  Added to the lower pressure drop associated with displacement ventilation terminals, selection of smaller and slower fans is possible for a reduction in fan energy. The supply air temperature is higher for displacement systems (circa 18°C) than for an overhead mixing system (circa 14°C), meaning there is greater access to free cooling throughout the year, thus improving chiller efficiency.  In general, the higher the space, the greater the payback, as consideration for cooling the whole space is not required.  Another benefit of displacement is the increased hygiene factor. New air is directed straight into the occupied zone, and old air rises to be extracted through the ceiling, meaning increased ventilation effectiveness. Working on the principles of buoyancy and stratification, air is effectively supplied at low velocity to involve minimal mixing. By so doing, airborne pollutants lighter than air rise above the breathing zone, meaning the air quality in the occupied zone is superior to that achieved with mixing ventilation.  Waterloo have introduced 11 models, the majority of which are complete with Swegon’s Varizon® system: offering one of the best levels of user comfort at close range on the market. The terminal can be set to move the near zone away from critical areas reducing the risk of draughts. This can be particularly effective in conference rooms with high occupancy & minimal space. The nozzles can also be readjusted after commissioning in instances of office restructure & occupant relocation.   By integrating selected airborne products from the Swegon group, Waterloo is now in the position to offer the widest range of room unit products on the UK market.   www.waterloo.co.uk            rachel.roots@waterloo.co.uk

Read More »

Greener homes pilot scheme underway

Senior members of Kirklees Council were out in Huddersfield to inspect work on a housing retrofit pilot project. The pilot is a demonstration of the council’s commitment to a carbon neutral Kirklees and shows how existing housing can be retrofitted to reduce carbon improve the warmth and comfort of residents. The pilot will combine a fabric first approach of insulating the loft, cavities and the external walls, with the installation of renewable technologies including a heat pump for heating and hot water which will replace the gas boiler and photovoltaic (solar PV) or solar thermal panels.   The eight properties, at Abbey Road, Far Town will also have new roofs, doors and windows. Once the work is complete, energy use and the performance of the new greener technologies will be monitored to help measure gains in carbon reduction. This will inform future schemes and help identify other homes across housing stock that could benefit from retrofitting. Councillor Cathy Scott, Cabinet member for Housing and Democracy, and Deputy Leader of the Council, said: “Through this pilot, Kirklees Council is looking at a project that could significantly contribute to our efforts in tackling the climate emergency and our aim to be carbon neutral by 2038. The eight properties will hopefully demonstrate that existing housing can be redesigned to use renewable energy instead of fossil fuels and with effective insulation, the carbon footprint of these properties can be diminished to net zero. Skills and regeneration are key priorities, this small-scale pilot has the potential to lead to larger projects in the future that will create opportunities for the people of Kirklees to learn a new skillset and get involved in innovative technologies.” Councillor Will Simpson, Cabinet Member for Culture and Greener Kirklees said: “This pilot project further demonstrates how Kirklees Council is committed to meeting its own carbon neutral targets for the district by 2038. I’m keen to see the results of the survey and how successful retrofitting energy saving solutions are in reducing the domestic carbon footprint. “I am hopeful that this pilot will provide a blueprint for the rest of the council’s housing stock but also a benchmark for privately owned and rented housing, to aim for, across the district and further afield.” Tracy Brabin, Mayor of West Yorkshire, was also on site and added: “I’m proud to be supporting Kirklees’ housing retrofit pilot which will make a real difference to the quality of life of its residents. By making homes more energy efficient, we can help people keep warm and reduce their energy bills while contributing to our ambition to make West Yorkshire net-zero carbon by 2038.”  Kirklees Council are working in partnership with Michael Dyson Associates, who have designed the properties, and Groundwork who are coordinating the retrofit project and will ensure the scheme is delivered to PAS 2035. Work started on 2 August 2021 and is due to end this December. Tenants are looking forward to no more gas bills and a greener home.

Read More »
New Extension Creates 90 More Places at Bleak Hill Primary School

New Extension Creates 90 More Places at Bleak Hill Primary School

Work has concluded on a multi-phase project to provide space for 90 more pupils at Bleak Hill Primary School in Windle, St Helens. The £2.5 million project began in October 2019 and took place over two phases, with contractor Seddon working throughout the various coronavirus lockdown measures to deliver the works on time. Work was completed earlier this year but due to Covid restrictions, the decision was made to delay the official opening event until the new academic year, once the pupils were back after the summer holidays. The brand-new extension to the main building adds four additional classrooms to the school, alongside 15 car park drop-off spaces for parents. The new classrooms allow the school to accommodate 90 pupils in total, helping to meet local demand for primary school places. Prior to this, phase one saw the construction of an extension to the school hall to address capacity issues, particularly at lunchtimes. Finished in 2020, the new, larger hall can now be converted into an extra multi-function classroom. The space will also be used for before and after-school activities, including a breakfast club for pupils. All enabling works for the project were completed during school holidays, to ensure there was no disruption for children and staff. Bleak Hill pupils complete a one-mile walk each day around the school grounds, so Seddon temporarily extended the playground to avoid interrupting this daily activity. The company also delivered external works, including a new bin storage area and painting new lines on the two football pitches, one of which was outside the scope of work as a goodwill gesture to the school. David Baines, Leader of St Helens Council, said: “Ian Wellens [former head teacher] has served Bleak Hill Primary School and the wider community with distinction and dedication for many years, and he leaves a lasting legacy. His legacy isn’t just the fantastic new classroom block, but it’s the brilliant staff, the school culture, and most important of all its hundreds of young people who have enjoyed a superb education here thanks to him and the whole school family. “Everyone with a connection to the school will miss Mr Wellens very much, but thanks to the foundations he’s laid and the example he’s set, we know the school will continue to go from strength to strength under Mrs Lawrenson and the fantastic staff team.” Councillor Kate Groucutt, Cabinet Member for Education, Skills and Business added: “These new classrooms will allow more children to access a quality education at Bleak Hill – one of the top performing schools in the borough. As a council, one of our key priorities is to ensure children and young people have the best possible starts in life, and projects like this – as well as similar improvement works set for Penkford and Ashurst Primary School – are clear proof of our commitment.” John Shannon, divisional director at Seddon, said: Overall, the two extensions allow Bleak Hill Primary School to provide more children from the local area with access to high-quality teaching and learning environments where they can reach the best of their abilities. “It’s been a pleasure to deliver this vital project for the school, especially over the past year, which has been incredibly difficult for everyone. The new facilities will go a long way in helping the community’s young people to thrive for years to come.” Seddon was awarded the two-stage project through the LHC Schools and Community Buildings Framework. Before the first coronavirus lockdown hit in March 2020, Seddon bought all roof tiles, bricks and blocks in bulk to keep the site open and ensure no delay to the construction programme. The company subcontracted bricklaying to David White Construction and the roofing works to Shawcroft.

Read More »

Kingspan Data & Flooring Technology Achieves Cradle to Cradle Certified® Bronze

Kingspan Data & Flooring Technology, the industry leader in data and flooring solutions, has achieved Cradle to Cradle Certified® bronze for their key raised access flooring solutions, based on an impartial and independent evaluation of material health, material reutilisation, renewable energy, water stewardship and social fairness. Cradle to Cradle Certified® is a globally recognised measure of safer, more sustainable products, demonstrating how successfully their products support the circular economy. At the end of life, Kingspan Data & Flooring Technology’s steel encapsulated wood-core panels, stay in closed-loop cycles with around 1,000 tonnes of recycled panels and 500 tonnes of waste-production sawdust, used to power three onsite biomass boilers, which then generate 2,500 megawatts of energy each year to power their manufacturing operations. Waste steel and off-cuts are shredded on-site and recycled into other products. The assessment was conducted by Eco Intelligent Growth before submitting to Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. The accreditation is the culmination of 12 months’ work by Kingspan Access Floors’ Quality and Compliance Manager, Phil Major, with assistance from internal teams in Hull, UK. Bianca Wong, Kingspan’s Global Head of Sustainability, comments: “Across all Kingspan divisions, we are working hard to further reduce the environmental impact of our products. We want to ensure all of our products reach the highest ethical standards and that our Planet Passionate strategy and commitments are embedded in everything we do globally. This achievement is an excellent example of Kingspan’s divisions constantly challenging themselves in partnership with industry to work towards a more sustainable future.” Kingspan Data & Flooring Technology’s Managing Director, Seamus Cussen, added: “Achieving overall bronze Cradle to Cradle Certified® status for our key raised access flooring solutions, is testament to the progress and the dedication our team has made to improve the sustainability of our entire portfolio of access flooring solutions. We will continue our focused efforts to improve and innovate but achieving this accreditation demonstrates our commitment driven from all areas of our business, to achieve high sustainability criteria.” Product designers, manufacturers and brands around the world rely on the Cradle to Cradle Certified® Product Standard, as a transformative pathway for designing and making products with a positive impact on people and planet.

Read More »

RoSPA Health and Safety Awards 2022 are now open for registration

After a bumper 2021, when nearly 2,000 entries from 49 countries were received, the RoSPA Health and Safety Awards 2022 are now open for registrations. As well as offering non-competitive achievement awards – in which Gold, Silver, Bronze and Merits are awarded – entrants can bid to be crowned the winner across a range of industry sectors. Awards entrants also gain access to a growing, worldwide community of likeminded professionals through the Awards Excellence Forum, sponsored by HSE Recruitment, a place to share and learn from best practice, enabling the improvement of health and safety systems globally, through regular events and seminars. In addition, those looking to gain the highest possible accolade can partner with high-performing entrants as part of the mentorship programme. New for this year, is the “Inspiring Women in Safety Award”, sponsored by L’Oréal, which will be presented to an individual who has made a significant impact in the world of health, safety and wellbeing. This may relate to activities within the workplace, or by use of their skills and expertise outside of their employment. RoSPA judges will consider how nominees have been a source of inspiration and a champion for gender, diversity and inclusion. Another key change for the RoSPA Awards in 2022, is that entrants will be asked to reflect on how they have managed health and safety issues connected to COVID-19 and identified the learning that can be brought forward. The application process will examine how organisations have supported their staff with the challenges associated with both working from home, and the reintegration to traditional workplaces after time spent away. Julia Small, Achievements Director at RoSPA, said: “For morethan 65 years, by working with our fantastic entrants, we are driving up health and safety standards around the world, making sure more and more people leave work unharmed each and every day. “Through the Awards Excellence Forum, entrants share how they are constantly improving their health and safety practices, and the entry process itself enables practitioners and teams to reflect and learn – and they earn points along with CPD. “Finally, as part of ongoing commitment to improving the awards experience, we have streamlined the process for registration, which will be of particular benefit to the many organisations who enter multiple sites. “We look forward to receiving submissions and celebrating achievements.” The RoSPA Awards 2022 are now open for registration. Early-bird discounts are available to those registering before November 1, 2021, and there are further discounts for RoSPA members. For more information on how to register and what the entry process involves see www.rospa.com/awards.

Read More »

Things to Consider When Choosing Concrete Formwork for Construction

The concrete’s properties can affect the formwork and the entire project. That is why it is critical to understand the concrete’s characteristics. In Brisbane, concrete is one of the most often utilized building materials. This is because it combines strength, durability, and lifespan with affordability and flexibility, to name a few advantages. However, while concrete has seen many improvements and new variants throughout the years, it is far from a novel material. According to many historical sources, it has been in use for about 2,500 years. Nowadays, it is utilized in many ways, from laying strong foundations to constructing pools and hardscapes and adding beautiful finishing touches. Basics of Concrete Forming Concrete forming is the act of securing liquid concrete in place as it chemically cures into a solid material utilizing prefabricated structures, ranging from plants to polymers. To achieve this, the forms must be robust, flush with the floor to prevent spillage, and, in most instances, detachable and reusable. Concrete must be poured into an enclosed area and allowed to solidify enough to retain its form. Newly poured concrete can be kept in form by existing features such as walls and edgings. Alternatively, temporary shuttering, commonly known as formwork, may be required. Formwork construction on vertical buildings can be challenging and is thus often performed by experienced formwork erectors. On the other hand, ground-level slab work is often less complex and requires just basic formwork. In all instances, whether vertical constructions or ground-level work, the formwork must be robust. It must be strong enough to withstand the forces generated by the wet concrete, as well as the weight of the vibration-generating equipment. In addition, the formwork joints must be securely secured to prevent the wet concrete from leaking during vibration and curing. Any expert formwork contractor from Brisbane will follow all the safety regulations and provide expert services. You can visit sites like www.formworkcontractorsbrisbane.com to get a better understanding of how such companies work. But a thing to remember is that if you are from Brisbane or any other part of Australia, you need to comply with the Australian concrete formwork standard. Standards for Concrete Formwork There is a general guideline called the Australian standard AS 3610-1995 formwork for concrete. You must comply with this standard if you plan to engage in any of the following activities, regardless of whether you live in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, or any other city in Australia. They are: Importance of Formwork Things to Consider for Concrete Framework Materials Concrete formwork can be constructed using a variety of materials. Steel and aluminum are two of the most prevalent. Steel is usually less expensive and offers the strength necessary for some building projects, but it is also heavier and bulkier. On the other hand, aluminum is lighter and more adaptable than steel, but it is usually costlier. Scale The scale should also be taken into account in the calculation. Numerous factors, such as the kind of formwork that will work best, are determined by the size and complexity of the building project. It will also affect the total cost of developing the formwork and other variables. Strength Additionally, strength is critical. The formwork must be robust enough to support both the weight of wet concrete and dried concrete. It should also be capable of withstanding any extra structural components that can be needed, as well as the pressure placed on it by your employees, equipment, and other factors. But it is advised to avoid too much pressure when placing concretes. Cost Cost is a significant consideration for all projects as well as each component. Formwork is no exception. It will affect the project’s cost regarding the materials and labor required to construct the formwork. Additionally, it can result in additional costs if it is not appropriately constructed and planned according to your particular requirements. Finally, if the formwork is heavy and difficult to handle, you can incur extra costs by renting the necessary equipment. Texture and Appearance  Different materials used in formwork have different textures. As such, they can affect the final concrete’s surface. If you need a smooth surface, make sure to choose the appropriate formwork materials. When different materials are used to cover the surface, the textures and effects of the formwork may not be an issue. Usability Whatever project you are working on, it is critical to have simple formwork to handle, install, and remove. This will assist you in staying on schedule and within budget for your project. On the other hand, difficult-to-manage formwork can result in expensive delays, unanticipated costs, and other complications. Joints Joint strength is essential in formwork from various perspectives. For one thing, the strength of the joints affects the formwork’s total strength. Second, suppose the joints are not strong and secure. In that case, you risk wasting a lot of material and producing a subpar final product. Safety Formwork should add to, not detract from, the safety of your building site. This feature is influenced by the materials used to construct the formwork, its strength, the strength of its joints, and its simplicity of usage. Strong materials that are well-assembled, suitable for the task at hand, and easy to deal with will contribute significantly to job site safety. Types of Concrete Forms A square foot of ordinary concrete weighs about 150 pounds, and a typical concrete project may need the placement of hundreds to thousands of square feet of concrete at once. Concrete forms must support all weight, so most forms are constructed of sturdy wood or metal. Although advances in concrete forms made of plastic, fiberglass, and resins have occurred in recent years, the cost and strength of these materials have not yet surpassed the established performance of metal and wood. Concrete Wall Pre-manufactured forming systems are often utilized for pouring walls or bigger structures such as piers or foundations. These wall systems, usually constructed of engineered wood with a metal frame or entirely metal, connect through a pin or latch mechanism. Additionally, these kinds of forms use

Read More »