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March 1, 2022

Kawneer and Polar NE join forces for Sowenna

Polar NE installs Kawneer product portfolio at Cornwall’s first children’s mental health unit Sowenna CAMHS is Cornwall’s first Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services unit. The £5 million purpose-built project demanded products that could provide a high level of thermal performance, whilst also enhancing the building’s levels of natural light

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New housing development will significantly boost local community

A VILLAGE on the outskirts of Lancaster is set to significantly benefit from a new housing development currently under construction. Homebuilder Russell Armer Homes has started building work on 65 two to four bedroom homes, as well as one bedroom apartments, at its Bowland Fold development in the village of

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Hollaway Studio to Design Carbon-Neutral HQ for Brompton Bicycle

Hollaway Studio to Design Carbon-Neutral HQ for Brompton Bicycle

Hollaway Studio has designed a pioneering new global headquarters and factory in Ashford, Kent for Brompton, the UK’s largest bicycle manufacturer. Aiming to open in 2027, the state of the art building will be situated within 100 acres of unused wetlands, 60 acres of which will be transformed by Ashford

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Demand Grows for Sensors in Smart Building Revolution

Demand Grows for Sensors in Smart Building Revolution

Infection control in healthcare settings has always been a top priority for building managers, but now, Sontay, a leading manufacturer of sensing devices that can monitor and report on a building’s conditions, is seeing demand for its sensors grow in other industry sectors too. Building managers, specifiers, and designers in

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Aquarian Cladding Systems makes two key appointments

Aquarian Cladding Systems, a specialist supplier of external brick and terracotta cladding systems, has strengthened its team with two key appointments. Ryan Callaghan joins as Technical Sales Manager in the South East of England, having started his career with an independent distributor in 2012, selling insulation and fire protection. He

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What Is Instructional Design?

Instructional design, or instructional system design (ISD), is the development of learning experiences and materials that result in gaining and applying knowledge and skills. The discipline is based on a system of assessing needs, designing a process, developing materials, and evaluating their effectiveness. ISD is a practical and systematic process

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Latest Issue

BDC 318 : Jul 2024

March 1, 2022

St. Modwen Logistics appoints GMI for landmark new Net Zero Carbon in operation industrial development in Longbridge.

The New 154,000 sq ft industrial/logistics unit is to be built at The Cofton Centre, a 35-acre, self-contained secure, managed estate which forms an integral part of the largest regeneration project in the West Midlands. GMI Construction Group PLC has today announced that it has been appointed by expert logistics/industrial developer St. Modwen Logistics to construct a new 154,000 sq ft industrial/logistics unit at a site in Longbridge, Birmingham.  The development being marketed as’ Longbridge 155’ will feature a best-in-class specification to include an array of sustainable design enhancements, energy saving technologies and Net Zero Carbon in operation features. It will showcase St. Modwen’s Swan Standard specification – a set of industry-leading sustainable development guidelines with a focus on responsible building practices that allows its customers to reduce running costs and carbon in operation emissions.  The development will aim to deliver a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rating together with targeting an EPC A+ rating, demonstrating significant investment and innovation in sustainability above current regulation and practice. It is expected to achieve an overall carbon reduction of 53% compared with energy requirements set out in the UK Building Regulations (Part L). The office space – comprising 12,626 sq ft – will be operationally Net Zero Carbon, achieved by limiting the operational energy demands and embodied carbon emissions. This includes the use of an energy efficient hybrid air source heat pump, smart metering and further sustainable enhancements such as AAA rated white goods which reduce electrical use; low energy lifts; and recycled carpets. The warehouse space will include several environmental credentials including triple-skinned GRP roof lights which reduce glare and overheating; built-up cladding which provides excellent air tightness and is fully recyclable; 20% electric vehicle charging; and PV solar panels, all of which underpin the BREEAM Excellent and EPC A+ rating. Construction of the facility started in February and the building expected to be available from Q3 2022. Talking about the project GMI Managing Director Andy Bruce Said: “This project is another big win for our Midlands team and Birmingham Office which we are rapidly expanding. We are delighted to once again be working for repeat customer St. Modwen Logistics on this prestigious scheme and part of the team working on the largest regeneration project in the West Midlands. With this instruction our Midlands division has now secured in excess of £130 million of work in just over two years working on some of the region’s most high-profile projects for many well-known brands. We are committed to building back stronger and this key project win further underlines our intentions for growth and opportunity. Also commenting Richard Carter, St. Modwen Logistics Senior Director of Construction said ‘As a valued supply chain partner, we are delighted to have appointed GMI to build Longbridge 155, and look forward to the successful completion of this and future projects’   The building has been designed to feature net zero carbon in operation as part of its commitments to drive its ambition to achieve net zero carbon developments with further reductions in embodied and operational carbon by delivering BREEAM excellent buildings with EPC ratings of A and better.  The development features a high-quality office specification, designed with the customer in mind, focusing on health and wellbeing, sustainability, and net carbon reduction”. Working alongside GMI are UMC Architects, engineers Rodgers Leask, KAM Project Consultants and RPPML.  The development is situated at The Cofton Centre, a self-contained secure, managed estate which is an integral part of the largest regeneration project in the West Midlands. The site is able to accommodate a wide range of industrial and distribution uses.  Situated only 1.5 miles from St. Modwen’s new £70 million Longbridge town centre and the highly successful Technology Park, Longbridge 155 offers occupiers an ideal opportunity to become part of an established commercial centre.  For further information about the project visit: https://stmodwenlogistics.co.uk/property/longbridge-155/ 

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Kawneer and Polar NE join forces for Sowenna

Polar NE installs Kawneer product portfolio at Cornwall’s first children’s mental health unit Sowenna CAMHS is Cornwall’s first Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services unit. The £5 million purpose-built project demanded products that could provide a high level of thermal performance, whilst also enhancing the building’s levels of natural light and help achieve a BREEAM Excellent building status. Along with ensuring excellent levels of daylight and access to external spaces and ventilation, the project’s challenges were increased by requiring multiple product solutions that could be harmonised and achieve the same levels of performance and aesthetics. The project requirements enabled Kawneer to utilise multiple products from their portfolio, which perfectly suited the specifications and helped the project achieve the required levels of thermal performance and successfully achieve its BREEAM Excellent status. The project included three types of Kawneer aluminium windows specifically designed and engineered for the mental health sector – Wansbeck Secure windows, Wear Secure windows and Humber Secure windows all feature on the project in multiple areas. The Humber Secure windows were developed in partnership with Humber NHS Foundation Trust as a low to medium secure window with an external sliding sash operated by a reduced ligature rotating handle. The Wansbeck Secure windows are designed for low-secure facilities and feature an internal sliding sash and the Wear Secure windows are an adaptation of the Wansbeck but with a secure mesh to guard the restricted open area. Alongside the bespoke window designs, Kawneer’s AA®100 zone-drained curtain wall system helped to create a dynamic and active façade that promotes high-levels of natural light to illuminate the main entrance, whilst AA®541 top-hung casement windows have been used in the café area and offices spaces, and AA®3720 folding/sliding doors feature in the courtyard areas. The new Sowenna CAMHS project was designed by international design practice Ryder Architecture and constructed by main contractor Tilbury Douglas on the site of the former Bodmin Community Hospital. The facility provides inpatient mental health and psychiatric intensive care for children and young people aged between 13 and 18 years. Victor Muniz, architectural director at Ryder, said the team responded to the design brief from Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust with a smart and functional design. He commented: “We have used Polar windows in several projects already and their products meet all current standards in terms of anti-ligature specification, robustness, good design and competitive costing.” He added: “We were looking for lots of natural light inside the building so the glazed elements played a very important role on this project. We were also aiming for BREEAM Excellent which was finally achieved. “The secure windows and curtain walling have a similar aesthetic to the standard components and help to ensure the safety and security of the external envelope for service users, staff and visitors. Our understanding is the trust is quite happy with the building.”

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New housing development will significantly boost local community

A VILLAGE on the outskirts of Lancaster is set to significantly benefit from a new housing development currently under construction. Homebuilder Russell Armer Homes has started building work on 65 two to four bedroom homes, as well as one bedroom apartments, at its Bowland Fold development in the village of Halton, near Lancaster. As part of the development, 13 affordable homes will be created for people with links to the local area and a significant sum of money will be granted to Lancaster City Council and ring fenced for the local community through the Government’s New Homes Bonus Scheme. In addition, 1.67 hectares of public open green space – which accounts for nearly 40 per cent of the overall development area – will be created and will include a children’s play area. And there will be significant tree planting and a biodiversity scheme implemented. Improvements will be made to the existing watercourse running through the site to provide one central, biodiverse ‘blue-green’ corridor to help manage and hold back surface water from existing homes. Nicky Gordon, the Managing Director of Russell Armer Homes, said: “As with every development, we closely consider what benefits we can provide to the local community and we are very passionate about improving the lives of local people. “We listened to what residents would like as part of the Bowland Fold development, and we’re proud to be providing so many key amenities and facilities to boost the local area. “The development comes at an exciting time for Russell Armer Homes and its sister company Genesis Homes as we start construction on more than 300 homes over three sites, and we’re looking forward to creating a great community in the county of Lancashire with this latest development.” The Bowland Fold development, located just off High Road, offers a broad mix of high quality homes which will suit a wide range of residential requirements but predominantly families through the provision of three and four bedroom houses. A total of two one-bed flats and 12 two bedroom homes will also be constructed to cater for all needs. The proposed play area is aimed at children under the age of 12 and constitutes part of the development’s green space. In addition to the Bowland Fold development at Halton, Russell Armer Homes is currently building 157 homes as part of its Meadow Rigg development at Burneside Road, in Kendal, Cumbria.

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Hollaway Studio to Design Carbon-Neutral HQ for Brompton Bicycle

Hollaway Studio to Design Carbon-Neutral HQ for Brompton Bicycle

Hollaway Studio has designed a pioneering new global headquarters and factory in Ashford, Kent for Brompton, the UK’s largest bicycle manufacturer. Aiming to open in 2027, the state of the art building will be situated within 100 acres of unused wetlands, 60 acres of which will be transformed by Ashford Borough Council into a rewilded public nature reserve and community cycle path with sustainability at its heart. The building is circled by a publicly accessible cycleway which weaves in and out of the building, providing both expansive views of the site and multisensory experiences of the factory processes along the route. The journey ends at the roof, where a Brompton Museum, recreational areas and a shared canteen for both workers and visitors alike can be found. A true 21st Century Bourneville, the factory will merge the public and private domains of industry through permitting the public to view not only how Brompton bikes are manufactured but to reveal and educate how industry works – a rarity in such settings and something that will position it firmly within the community. Challenging the traditional perception of manufacturing, Hollaway has designed the factory to work in harmony with and become part of its natural surroundings, sustainability will be at the heart of the carbon-neutral facility which will draw heat from the ground, utilise natural light and air flows and harness the power of the site’s wind and sun exposure to contribute to energy demands. The footprint of the building and the impact on the surrounding wetland has been kept to a minimum by housing the events spaces, museum, canteen, and terrace upon the roof. Just like a Brompton bike, the factory will be built to last, with construction methods examined, embodied carbon explored and materials responsibly sourced to ensure the site can enable future adaptation and be resilient to the changing climate. Through its design, Hollaway highlights the possibility of making industry clean and giving back to nature. Positioned 2.2m above the wetlands, the building appears to float as it coexists with the wetlands below, allowing water levels to rise and fall throughout the year. This is aided by a reinforced floorplate, supported by foundation piles which also serve to draw heat from the ground. Created to realise Brompton’s future ambition of producing over 200,000 bikes per year, by 2027, Brompton expects to employ over 1,500 staff. Hollaway’s design acknowledges Brompton’s tremendous growth over the last 5 years. The new Ashford factory is perfectly located between the leading cycling cities of London and Paris, to enable their future ambitions and to continue to transform the way that people move in cities around the world. Brompton will partner with Ashford Borough Council and Quinn Estates for the development and will invest in the local community through the creation of skilled worker roles and the visitor centre at the factory, including the museum and educational space to facilitate active outreach to local schools. Brompton has held a relationship with Ashford since 2014 as one of the first Brompton Bike Hire docks was installed at Ashford International Station, which will be expanded as part of the plans. Brompton’s current factory in Greenford, West London will continue to operate until at least 2030.

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Maintaining Properties Cool in Summer Should Not Affect Sustainability

Maintaining Properties Cool in Summer Should Not Affect Sustainability

Due to be effective from June, Part ‘O’ of the Building Regulations relates to overheating in properties and focuses on the need to uphold the health and wellbeing of occupants, while keeping them cool. The new regulation aims to limit instances of high indoor temperatures in new-build residencies by mitigating unnecessary solar gains in summer whilst ensuring there is provision to remove excess heat from the property where required. So, does insulation have a part to play in the cooling process? Part ‘O’ is a response to concerns that with designers being urged to create properties of ever-greater airtight performance in order to improve thermal efficiency, buildings are overheating due to a lack of proper air regulation. With solar gain being a major contributor to indoor temperature increase, the regulations outline a number of fixed shading measures which should be used to offset it. These include shutters, external blinds, overhangs and awnings. Glazing design is also highlighted as a consideration to reducing overheating risk, with window-size, orientation and g-value (the rate at which glass transmits solar heat) being cited as important to the specification process. Part ‘O’ regulations state that ‘as far as reasonably practicable’ the standard should be achieved using passive means. Insulation falls into that category and is proven to prevent heat escape in colder months, particularly when installed as part of fabric-first building design. To a certain extent, quality insulation will also negate heat entry into a property. However, on its own it will not be enough to combat uncomfortable temperature increases caused by excessive solar gain. This is why Part ‘O’ recommends non-passive interventions in the form of mechanical cooling and ventilation systems are used to reduce heat build-up and meet regulations. However, it stipulates that such interventions should only be seen as a secondary solution to other passive measures including open windows and exterior ventilation louvres. Although not the ultimate solution to the overheating issue, quality insulation remains integral to creating energy-efficient homes and with it, reducing CO2 emissions. According to a 2021 report by the Environmental Audit Committee (EAC), energy inefficiency meant the UK’s housing stock accounted for 20% of the country’s greenhouse gases. Poorly insulated walls, ceilings and roofs are a major cause of fuel usage in counteracting the resulting energy escape. It’s important, therefore, that the risk of overheating is not a barrier to achieving a thermally efficient home. Properties can be airtight, breathable, and cool, it just requires a degree of common sense and utilising natural ventilation where required, such as opening windows, to prevent rooms from overheating in summer months. Otherwise, costly and energy-consuming mechanical ventilation systems will impact our homes’ sustainability by neutralising the insulation’s effect in creating a comfortable interior climate throughout all four seasons.

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Demand Grows for Sensors in Smart Building Revolution

Demand Grows for Sensors in Smart Building Revolution

Infection control in healthcare settings has always been a top priority for building managers, but now, Sontay, a leading manufacturer of sensing devices that can monitor and report on a building’s conditions, is seeing demand for its sensors grow in other industry sectors too. Building managers, specifiers, and designers in hospitality, residential, education and retail, are beginning to recognise the need to control the spread of infection in buildings and ensure the optimum environment for people, so they are not only comfortable, but safe too. “Sensors play a vital role in modern Building Management Systems (BMS), measuring, reporting, and controlling a building’s environment allowing urgent action to be taken quickly if necessary. Today we really are at the beginning of a smart buildings’ revolution. Sensors are no longer just seen as necessary in large commercial and public buildings like hospitals, care homes and factories, they are becoming mainstream. We are seeing them placed into offices and private homes. New digital technology, including sensors, are really helping us to improve and manage people’s wellbeing,” said Commercial & Marketing Director of Sontay, Stacey Lucas. Stacey believes there will be new legislation coming out around mitigating infection spread in the built environment, primarily for the healthcare and public sectors. With the introduction of Part O to the Building Regulations in England, which set standards for overheating in new residential buildings, she also believes that the government is now placing a greater focus than ever before on protecting the health and welfare of a building’s occupants. Thankfully, there is a myriad of sensors available to ensure buildings are comfortable and safe for occupants. As well as CO2 sensors, there are PM 2.5 sensors, which measure the amount of particulate matter in the air. Studies have shown that bacteria and viruses can piggyback particulate matter. Another type of sensor that is in demand is the relative humidity (RH) sensor. Bacteria can develop in environments where there is a lot of moisture. Humid conditions are therefore the perfect setting for bacteria to multiply. Studies show that when cold, dry air is warmed once indoors, relative humidity drops by 20%. Such a decrease makes it easier for airborne particles, including viruses, to travel. Decreasing temperature and moisture (relative humidity), creates a less hospitable environment for microorganisms to grow. “People are becoming increasingly aware of the necessity of infection control since the pandemic began, it is important that we maintain that momentum to ensure that infection control and the importance of managing a building’s environment for the wellbeing of its occupants, continues to be a top priority for specifiers and designers alike,” Stacey concluded.

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Aquarian Cladding Systems makes two key appointments

Aquarian Cladding Systems, a specialist supplier of external brick and terracotta cladding systems, has strengthened its team with two key appointments. Ryan Callaghan joins as Technical Sales Manager in the South East of England, having started his career with an independent distributor in 2012, selling insulation and fire protection. He then joined Kingspan’s insulation division, before more recently becoming a key member of their light gauge steel framing sales team. “I was very aware of Aquarian as they had a strategic relationship with Kingspan and the opportunity to join them really appealed to me. I could see the opportunity to grow and develop whilst having a bigger impact in a business,” said Ryan, who will be tasked with building and managing relationships with key sub-contractors and main contractors. “I see a huge market opportunity for Aquarian, particularly because of the industry drive towards non-combustible construction. We have two fantastic non-combustible brick cladding solutions, with plans to add to our existing portfolio, so I can only see positives for me and the company as we combine our experience of supplying materials for use on buildings over 18m.” Laurence Bailey joins as Architectural Specification Manager for London, having worked in construction for 18 years. His previous roles have included working in technical departments for brick and brick cladding manufacturers, as well as a CAD technician for a structural engineer. Laurence, who will engage with architects from the earliest stage possible to ensure Aquarian’s products are specified, said: “Whilst with my previous company, we would regularly compete with Aquarian and I could tell they knew their stuff, with good people and good products. “With a really comprehensive range of fully tested and certified products to suit all sorts of needs and all sorts of budgets, I’m really looking forward to working with architects to make them aware of Aquarian products and of course help them to specific our products.” With a product portfolio that includes brick slip cladding systems such as the A1-rated MechSlip and NaturAL-X, the Gebrik Insulating Brick Cladding System and A1-rated Terreal Terracotta Rainscreen System, Aquarian Cladding Systems have worked with architects, contractors, developers, and cladding contractors on many award-winning buildings across a wide range of sectors. Jazz Rigden, Aquarian Cladding Systems’ Sales Director said: “I am absolutely delighted to welcome both Laurence and Ryan to the Aquarian team. Both have a huge amount of experience in the industry and have already hit the ground running. “Laurence will provide specification support to ensure our products are appropriately specified and Ryan will ensure the end user receives our full support to ensure materials are ordered accurately. “This additional investment in our team is further evidence of our ambitious plans to grow and develop the business across the country.” For more information or to discuss your project requirements please visit www.aquariancladding.co.uk/

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What Is Instructional Design?

Instructional design, or instructional system design (ISD), is the development of learning experiences and materials that result in gaining and applying knowledge and skills. The discipline is based on a system of assessing needs, designing a process, developing materials, and evaluating their effectiveness. ISD is a practical and systematic process for designing an effective curriculum. Instructional Design Models One of the most commonly used ISD models is Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, Evaluation (ADDIE). In the past few years, the utilization of more agile, iterative approaches has come into play. Agile models, such as the Successive Approximation Model (SAM), involve shorter design sprints in which a prototype is quickly created, reviewed, and revised until the stakeholders are happy. The most common instructional design models include ADDIE, Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping, the Dick and Carey Model, the Kemp Design Model, Merrill’s First Principles of Instruction, SAM, and Agile or rapid prototyping. Part of designing models that inform and convey clear information is using the right visualizations. A line chart provides a clear graphical representation of time-dependent variables and is the best method of showing trends or variables over a period of time. This simple chart comprises data values plotted as points along X and Y axes and connected with line segments. The X-axis represents time while the Y-axis represents a metric of interest of the period being tracked. There are several different types of line graphs, including multi-series line charts, multi-axis line charts, step-line charts, zoom line charts, scroll line charts, and spline or fitted curve line charts. A line chart is a useful visualization tool when tracking a time-dependent variable, watching trends, and spotting and comparing patterns between variables. What’s an Instructional Designer? An instructional designer uses this methodology to design and develop content, experiences, and other solutions that support the gaining of new knowledge or skills. They conduct a needs assessment to determine the learning needs, including what the learner needs to know and do as a result of the training and what knowledge and skills the learner already has. Instructional designers then create a course design and all instructional materials such as presentation materials, participant guides, handouts, and job aids. They are also responsible for evaluating the effectiveness of the training and determining whether the learning solution resulted in a measurable behavior change. Instructional design requires analyzing and selecting the best strategies, methodologies, and technologies to maximize the learning experience and knowledge transfer. The best way to achieve your career goals and earn the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed is to pursue higher education. The University of Cincinnati’s Master of Instructional Design and Technology degree is ranked among the best by U.S. News and World Report. The online program focuses on the design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials and programs, as well as the use of technology to deliver educational and training services. The education technology online program delivers an interdisciplinary educational experience with coursework in the fields of cognitive science, education, design, information technology, and computer science. Over 30 credit hours, students complete coursework in instructional design, multimedia studio use, designing online assessments for data-driven decisions, and trends and issues in learning technology evaluation. Upon completion of the online masters instructional design program, graduates are prepared for careers as online instructors, corporate online trainers, online learning content developers, e-learning consultants, educational technology specialists, and e-learning managers. Instructional Design Components The components of most instructional design models and processes are similar. A needs analysis includes understanding learners’ needs and why a learning solution is necessary. In some instances, a learning solution isn’t necessary and another type of performance improvement or non-training solution is more appropriate. During the analysis stage, the goals of the training are developed, including learning objectives and determining how the training will be given. Design and development include the design and creation of instructional learning materials and delivery methods. The evaluation process looks at how to determine whether or not the learning solution was successful. Popular evaluation models include Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels of Training Evaluation, Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method, Philips ROI Methodology, and the Learning-Transfer Evaluation Model. Use this information to decide whether or not instructional design is a good field for you!

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