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August 15, 2022

ROCKWOOL® announces the launch of NyRock technology

Rockwool’s new launch of NyRock technology delivers improved thermal performance, while maintaining non-combustibility and acoustic capabilities As pressure mounts on the construction industry to deliver more thermally efficient buildings whilst preserving standards of fire and acoustic performance, ROCKWOOL has launched NyRock technology. NyRock is an evolution in stone wool composition

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PROPOSED PART Z AND EMBODIED CARBON REGULATION

Despite research by the UK Green Building Council (Nov 2021) showing that embodied carbon emissions due to the construction process, maintenance and demolition of buildings, created 40 to 50 million tonnes of CO2 annually – more than aviation and shipping combined, the UK government has failed to regulate the embodied

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A third of female project professionals think unequal pay is the main barrier preventing more women entering the profession, new study by APM reveals

33.4% of female project managers say unequal levels of pay is the biggest barrier facing women who’d like to get into project-based careers Survey reveals divided opinions, with the most common response from male project professionals that it’s because project management is still considered to be a male dominated profession

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Roann Limited secures exclusive worktop supply rights for £157 million Sackville Road project

Premium quartz and granite worktop supplier, Roann Limited, has secured the £200,000 contract to provide work surfaces to the Brighton-based Sackville Road project by contractor, Moda Living.  The Wakefield-based business was appointed by Deanestor, the furniture manufacturer, to supply 600 state-of-the art apartments with 20mm Cosentino Silestone Lagoon quartz, made

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How 3D Printing Can Help the Home Construction Industry

Home construction is an industry that has been slow to adopt new technologies. We have seen a shift in recent years, but the entire process of building homes is still a very manual one. That’s why 3D printing is such a promising technology in home construction. Examples of benefits of

Read More »
Company Launches Environmentally Friendly Theme Park Special Effects

Company Launches Environmentally Friendly Theme Park Special Effects

In an attempt to revolutionise the theme park industry, Experts Back Stage Technologies Europe (BST) will be launching at London’s ExCeL event its range of innovative and environmentally friendly special effects. With over 500 exhibitors attending IAAPA’s Expo Europe this September, BST will be showcasing its spectacular and sustainable flame,

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Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

August 15, 2022

ROCKWOOL® announces the launch of NyRock technology

Rockwool’s new launch of NyRock technology delivers improved thermal performance, while maintaining non-combustibility and acoustic capabilities As pressure mounts on the construction industry to deliver more thermally efficient buildings whilst preserving standards of fire and acoustic performance, ROCKWOOL has launched NyRock technology. NyRock is an evolution in stone wool composition that delivers the lowest lambda stone wool insulation available in the UK. NyRock has a more efficient fibre structure to deliver low thermal conductivity Created using a new patented production process, this next generation stone wool insulation has a more efficient fibre structure that can deliver thermal conductivity as low as 0.032 W/mK. This means that U-values can be met with comparatively thinner constructions, which in the case of external wall applications, creates the potential for additional interior floor space over a given building footprint. Alongside its improved thermal efficiency, NyRock technology still delivers all the additional benefits of stone wool insulation including durability, the ability to be recycled indefinitely, and acoustic and fire performance. Comprising naturally non-combustible volcanic rock, ROCKWOOL solutions powered by NyRock technology achieve Euroclass A1 (the highest possible rating) and can withstand temperatures in excess of 1000°C. A solution to the rapidly evolving needs of the built environment Paul Barrett, head of product management at ROCKWOOL UK, commented: “Our new products featuring NyRock technology will be significant for the construction industry, giving specifiers and building owners a true solution to the rapidly evolving needs of the built environment and its biggest challenges. “To limit the impact of climate change and support the delivery of net zero carbon in the UK by 2050, it’s the responsibility of manufacturers like ourselves to go further, re-inventing and improving on existing solutions. NyRock technology does just that. “While stone wool insulation is already known for its proven benefits such as longevity, ease of install, circularity, and non-combustibility that is crucial for protecting people and properties, our patented technology builds on these advantages further. “Whether specifiers need a solution to the lower U-values of England’s new Approved Document L that also maximises floor space, or a non-combustible option for a high-rise property with enhanced thermal and acoustic performance, NyRock technology’s industry-leading lambda value for stone wool and ability to reduce the thickness of a construction element support those requirements.” NyRock technology will be rolled out across a range of ROCKWOOL insulation solutions during 2022. To register for updates on the launch of products featuring NyRock technology, visit rockwool.com/uk/nyrock or click here.

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PROPOSED PART Z AND EMBODIED CARBON REGULATION

Despite research by the UK Green Building Council (Nov 2021) showing that embodied carbon emissions due to the construction process, maintenance and demolition of buildings, created 40 to 50 million tonnes of CO2 annually – more than aviation and shipping combined, the UK government has failed to regulate the embodied carbon cost of construction whilst focusing solely on operational emissions. As a result, experts in the field of decarbonisation have worked together to develop a proposal for amendments to the Building Regulations that could be used to mandate the reporting and limiting of carbon emissions. Head of Sustainability at Whitecode, Ellen Huelin, takes a look at the proposed Part Z amendment to the Building Regulations and the concept of embodied carbon regulation. She argues that without such regulation the UK could easily fail to meet its ambitious carbon emissions targets.  There has been a great deal of focus trained on the energy efficiency of properties being built and operational emissions, but not enough attention has been paid to the sustainable aspect of the construction process. I agree with the authors of the proposed amendments to The Building Regulations 2010 that there is the need for legislation to be introduced that would ensure that embodied carbon is assessed on all projects as part of a comprehensive whole-life carbon assessment.  The House of Commons’ Environmental Audit Committee agree. In its report in May 2022 entitled Building to net Zero: costing carbon in construction, it states that the single most significant policy the government could introduce is a mandatory requirement to undertake a whole-life carbon assessment for buildings and that this requirement should be set within building regulations and the planning system. It says the government should then develop progressively ratcheting carbon targets for buildings, with a clear timeline for introducing this in place by the end of 2022. This is the biggest indication yet that the government is beginning to listen to our industry which has been actively supporting the concept behind a new Part Z and recognising that, as a result of a lack of policy, no real progress has been made in reducing embodied carbon emissions within the built environment. Our sustainability team at Whitecode has a great deal of experience carrying out whole life-cycle carbon (WLC) emission assessments, that consider operational as well as embodied carbon emissions together over a project’s expected life cycle, because the London Plan (policy SI 2) sets out a requirement for development proposals to calculate and reduce WLC emissions as part of a WLC assessment. London has an ambitious target to become zero-carbon by 2050, but even the London Plan has no specific embodied carbon targets, only ones around reducing carbon in operation. Outside of London it seems that only the most forward-thinking developers or those where sustainability is their Unique Selling Point (USP) are carrying out voluntary whole-life carbon assessments.  Policy change will be the quickest route to transform the industry so that we can match countries including the Netherlands, France and Sweden who already regulate embodied carbon emissions. It is frustrating that we are lagging behind others when we have an industry that is calling for it! Any new policy needs to be progressive otherwise the industry will not achieve substantive change. The government’s Future Homes and Buildings Standard will ensure that all future homes will be net zero ready from 2025, if new regulations around embodied carbon emissions don’t come into play soon, this will be a standard that will be difficult to meet. We also need regulation and quickly, around the use of sustainable construction materials to ensure that as an industry we are working towards net-zero. To do this I believe the government needs to incentivise their use and their development. We need to consider the circular economy. We know that we shouldn’t be putting things into landfill and that we should be looking to recycle where possible, but we don’t want to just be able to recycle; we need to be able to re-use construction materials again and again. We need to look at how functional and adaptable they are and ensure they are designed for assembly so they can be remodelled and repurposed. We can no longer just stick materials together if we want to work towards a whole life-cycle approach. Industry standardisation will support moves to regulate embodied carbon. Notes on the proposed Part Z say that a cross-industry team is developing a free-to-use Built Environment Carbon Database (BECD) that will be launched this year, the idea being that it minimises the cost and complexity of the process of measuring embodied carbon. The BECD will also include a product database. The standardisation and bringing together of information is vital to allow new regulations to be easily implemented. The government needs to adopt this approach by standardising methodology, creating reporting frameworks and setting minimum targets for the construction sector.  Industry support for regulation is clear, with major developers and industry bodies stepping forward to support the concept of Part Z. I am also seeing a change of mindset coming from within the sector around environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG). Recently I have been asked by a number of clients for advice around ESG and one client has asked me to join their sustainability steering group to help them with the mechanisms of placing sustainability intrinsically within their business. These are positive developments that demonstrate a real appetite by companies to accelerate their reduction in carbon emissions. The government needs to recognise that the construction industry is ready and willing for change. The time is now.  There has been a great deal of focus trained on the energy efficiency of properties being built and operational emissions, but not enough attention has been paid to the sustainable aspect of the construction process. I agree with the authors of the proposed amendments to The Building Regulations 2010 that there is the need for legislation to be introduced that would ensure that embodied carbon is assessed on all projects

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A third of female project professionals think unequal pay is the main barrier preventing more women entering the profession, new study by APM reveals

33.4% of female project managers say unequal levels of pay is the biggest barrier facing women who’d like to get into project-based careers Survey reveals divided opinions, with the most common response from male project professionals that it’s because project management is still considered to be a male dominated profession Too few women taking STEM subjects at school, college or university is considered to be biggest barrier for women entering the project profession according to project professionals in the transport and logistics (35% of respondents) and construction (40%) sectors. A new survey by Association for Project Management (APM), the chartered membership organisation for the project profession, has revealed the differences between what male and female project professionals consider to be the biggest barrier preventing more women entering the project profession.  The survey of 1,000 project professionals (from junior to director level), undertaken with research company Censuswide, shows that of the 308 female respondents, a third (33.4%) say that unequal pay is the main barrier, followed by gender stereotyping (32.5%) and not enough women having taken STEM subjects while studying at school, college or university (29%). However, among the male respondents to the survey, the most common reason as to why more women aren’t joining the project profession is that it’s still being perceived as male dominated (cited by 31.5% of male respondents). The findings shine new light on workplace diversity, gender equality and women’s career journeys; topics that APM will be exploring its upcoming Women in Project Management conference. APM’s survey also highlights the different opinions of project professionals within different industry sectors. For example, among those working in engineering, 43% said gender stereotyping is the biggest barrier for women entering their profession, as well as professionals working in telecoms, where 40% say it’s the biggest barrier. Unequal levels of pay are considered as the biggest barrier to women entering project management as a career within the financial services sector (38%) and in technology (40%). And too few women taking STEM subjects at school, college or university is considered to be biggest barrier for women entering the project profession for those in the transport and logistics (35% of respondents in this sector) and construction (40%) sectors. Professor Adam Boddison, Chief Executive of APM, says: “Our latest findings highlight that there are still challenges to overcome in seeing more women entering the project profession. As the chartered body for the project profession, we would call on men in the profession – especially those with responsibility for hiring new people into the workplace – to take close heed of these findings and to be mindful of how their own perceptions of issues around equality may differ from the actual experiences of women. “APM is committed to raising awareness and supporting our members and the wider project profession in understanding the issues affecting women in the profession and in considering what more can be done to improve equality and inclusivity in the workplace. We look forward to welcoming attendees to our upcoming Women in Project Management conference in September where people of all genders will be able to share insights, hear new ideas and acquire knowledge on these issues and many others.” APM’s most recent Salary and Market Trends Survey highlights the salary figures[2] for men and women working in the project profession, and it reveals a gender pay gap of 24%. Although there was some positive change outlined in the report, with women making up a growing proportion of those earning between £50,000 and £69,999 – up from 20% from the previous year to 24% – the Salary and Market Trends Survey found that women are still over-represented in roles where lower salaries are the norm: they account for four out of five project administrators (79%), while representing 57% of part-time workers. By contrast only 22% of consultants, who enjoy higher average salaries, are women. APM’s new survey also asked the profession what they considered to be main barrier for both men and women being recruited into the profession, with lack of awareness of project management as a career choice (30%) coming out on top, followed by a lack of skilled individuals (28%), and budget restrictions (28%). Turning from barriers to opportunities for the profession, pivoting to new energy sources (32.5% of respondents), tackling climate change and working towards Net Zero (32%), and AI, automation and big data (32%) were considered to be the biggest opportunities for the profession over the next five years – for both male and female professionals.  

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Half of UK tradespeople have delayed or refused work because of the materials shortage

More than three quarters (78%) of tradespeople have struggled to source materials this year  New research reveals the 10 materials that workers have found hardest to source  Plasterers, surveyors and joiners are the worst affected trades  The materials shortage has plagued the UK trade industry for two years, and now new research has revealed the stark impact this has had on workers in the sector.  The study, conducted by IronmongeryDirect, the UK’s largest supplier of specialist ironmongery, found that more than three-quarters (78%) of tradespeople have struggled to source the materials they’ve needed in the last year.  As a result, almost half (46%) have had to delay or turn down work, and nearly a fifth (19%) have been forced to let customers down after committing to jobs.  When asked which specific materials they’ve found difficult to find, the most common replies were paint (21%), timber (19%) and steel (17%).  The 10 materials that UK tradespeople have found hardest to source in the last year are:  #  Material  %  1  Paint  21%  2  Timber  19%  3  Steel  17%  4  Blocks  14%  5  Bricks  13%  6  Coatings  13%  7  Semi-conductors  13%  8  Plasterboard  12%  9  Cement  12%  10  Microchips  12%  Unfortunately, more than one in five (22%) respondents said that they can’t see the shortage easing anytime soon, and that they believe problems will continue into 2023.  Inflation is the main factor they blame (20%), with record levels driving up prices across the board and affecting the supply chain.  The impact of Coronavirus (17%), rising energy costs (15%) and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine (15%) are also perceived to be responsible.  While the shortage has been felt across the industry, some trades have struggled to source materials more than others. The study found that plasterers (92%), surveyors (88%) and joiners (87%) have been hit the hardest.  Roofers, however, are the most likely workers to have had to turn down work (60%) as a result of the issue.  Dominick Sandford, Managing Director at IronmongeryDirect, said: “The materials shortage continues to be one of the industry’s main challenges, with workers across all trades finding it hard to source what they need to meet the demand for their services.  “The impact is felt in many ways – financially, as many have had to refuse work as a result, but also personally, as our recent Mental Health in the Trades report found that the shortage is one of the main causes of stress for tradespeople in 2022.  “In recent weeks, there have been signs of the situation easing slightly, so hopefully things will continue to improve as the year goes on.”  To see which materials each individual trade has found difficult to source this year, and how prices have increased over time, visit: https://www.ironmongerydirect.co.uk/blog/how-is-the-materials-shortage-affecting-uk-tradespeople  

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2022 continues to be a record year for hardwood imports, says Timber Development UK

The latest Timber Development UK (TDUK) statistics show record hardwood volumes were imported in May 2022. Overall import volumes for hardwood were up 25% in the period running from January to May 2022, relative to the same period in 2021. This increase in hardwood volumes has largely been driven by Latvia and France, with their totals growing 110% and 82% respectively. Tropical hardwoods have also seen growth, up 44%, with Cameroonian volumes leading in this category, increasing by 4,081m3 in 2022. Overall timber volumes were also high in May 2022, as volumes climbed over the million m3 mark for the first time since September 2021. This growth in the month was driven by higher volumes of softwood, hardwood, plywood and particleboard compared to May 2021, only OSB and MDF volumes were lower. Softwood imports remain 18% below the record levels seen in 2021. TDUK Head of Technical and Trade, Nick Boulton, said: “Though May 2022 totals resembled the record levels seen last year, the overall market position in 2022 is certainly more diverse than 2021. “Hardwood imports have been driven by the pallet and packaging trade which has begun to use lower-priced, more temperate hardwood species over typically used softwood. “The global logistics market is buoyant with demand outstripping the capacity to recirculate and where necessary repair existing pallet stocks. This means the demand for new wood pallets, bearers and dunnage are all at high levels, putting significant pressure on the available log supply and specialist mills that service this sector. “New sectors are also causing pressure on supply with wood fuel, for example, becoming a key driver of demand across Europe due to the energy insecurity caused by the Russia-Ukraine conflict. Members can read the full statistics report here.

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Roann Limited secures exclusive worktop supply rights for £157 million Sackville Road project

Premium quartz and granite worktop supplier, Roann Limited, has secured the £200,000 contract to provide work surfaces to the Brighton-based Sackville Road project by contractor, Moda Living.  The Wakefield-based business was appointed by Deanestor, the furniture manufacturer, to supply 600 state-of-the art apartments with 20mm Cosentino Silestone Lagoon quartz, made up of premium natural minerals and recycled materials.  The new urban village development will be located in the centre of Brighton, near to Hove train station – and just a short walk away from the sea-front. The scheme will range from studio, one, two and three-bedroom properties to a penthouse apartment. The development will be transformed into an intergenerational neighbourhood, suitable for families and individuals – the site will also include 260 care community homes.  Residents will be able to benefit from a number of onsite amenities such as a 24-hour gym, flexible co-working spaces, a roof terrace, BBQ area and so much more. Construction is well underway and the Sackville Road site is set for completion in early 2024.  Scott Wharton, Sales Director at Roann Limited, says: “The Sackville Road project is a fantastic opportunity for us to further broaden our portfolio. The Silestone quartz worktops and splashbacks will be sleek, contemporary and designed to last. With a strong focus on community, this inner-city regeneration scheme is a fantastic addition to the already vibrant city. We look forward to seeing the completed project!”  More information on Roann Limited and its products is available at www.roann.co.uk.

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How 3D Printing Can Help the Home Construction Industry

Home construction is an industry that has been slow to adopt new technologies. We have seen a shift in recent years, but the entire process of building homes is still a very manual one. That’s why 3D printing is such a promising technology in home construction. Examples of benefits of using 3D printing for home construction include: Less need for manual labor, making the process of building homes more efficient Waste reduction by reducing the need for construction materials often discarded after use Lower costs for homeowners by reducing overall labor costs, material waste, and other expenses. However, that’s not all. This article will discuss some key aspects of 3D printing that make it an attractive option for home construction: the freedom to design and construct homes without limitations. This is especially useful when making custom-built homes that fit a specific customer’s needs and preferences. So, let’s read on. Faster production time 3D printing has become a significant tool in the home construction industry. It’s no secret that 3D printing can help speed up production time, but just how much?  Compared to traditional manufacturing methods, 3D printing can save you hours of work and result in products that are identical in quality. The process begins with an outline or sketch of the object you wish to create. Your computer then imports this image into a 3D modeling program, where it translates it into digital data sent to a printer that uses plastic filament as its building material.  Using this method allows you to create any imaginable design without worrying about outsourcing your work or waiting for shipments. Lower cost of materials 3D printing is also more efficient than traditional manufacturing. For example, in the case of a 3D-printed house, you can use waste material like old tires and turn them into bricks that are used to build your house. This will help you save on the cost of making bricks from scratch, which can be very expensive. Another benefit of 3D printing is its ability to create materials that are lighter than what would be produced from regular machines. An added benefit of 3D printing is its ability to produce materials that are lighter than what would be produced from regular machines. This means less material will have to be used, saving money and reducing the time it takes to build a home. Easier planning process 3D printing can help with the planning process. If you’re designing a new home, you can create models that are available for your clients to look at. This will make it easier for them to visualize their project and provide input about what they want in their final product. This also helps ensure less confusion and conflict between what was agreed upon during the design phase and what actually gets delivered. Besides, 3D printing helps with the design process itself because it allows different ideas to be tested quickly without having to do any physical work or wasting material on failed designs. Fewer errors from human labor 3D printing is a technology renowned for its high accuracy, which means that it can produce items with fewer errors than human labor. This is especially important for the home construction industry, as many different parts of a house need to be made with precision and care. For example, the doors for your new home will be measured precisely to fit together correctly (and don’t fall off their hinges). If one of these door measurements happens to be off by just 1/10th of an inch, then every door in your house won’t fit as well as it should. Environmentally friendly 3D printing is more environmentally friendly than traditional manufacturing and construction processes like CNC machining or milling. First, 3D printing doesn’t require the same kind of energy and raw materials as traditional manufacturing processes. In fact, it’s not only less resource-intensive but also cleaner. When you use 3D printing technology like that employed in printers from Massivit 3D to make something, you’re not producing hazardous waste or chemical byproducts like when making products on an assembly line at scale. Additionally, there are fewer steps involved in producing one object using a 3D printer than other methods such as injection molding or casting metal ingots into molds (which requires melting). That means less transportation between different factories or locations worldwide—and fewer emissions from transportation trucks. Conclusion We believe 3D printing in home construction will be a valuable asset to the industry. It can save time and money, reduce errors from human labor, improve planning processes, and allow for environmentally friendly construction methods. All this while helping us build better homes for our future generations.

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Company Launches Environmentally Friendly Theme Park Special Effects

Company Launches Environmentally Friendly Theme Park Special Effects

In an attempt to revolutionise the theme park industry, Experts Back Stage Technologies Europe (BST) will be launching at London’s ExCeL event its range of innovative and environmentally friendly special effects. With over 500 exhibitors attending IAAPA’s Expo Europe this September, BST will be showcasing its spectacular and sustainable flame, smoke, fragrance, and fog effects. Just like in any other industry, businesses and their customers are starting to become more aware and conscious of their impact on the environment, which is why BST wanted to take a first step in the theme park industry and deliver effects that have not been heard of before. “Special effects have historically not been very environmentally friendly or at the very least, not from renewable or sustainable sources. Typical examples would be propane flames and explosions, as well as smoke and fog machines which use chemicals such as glycol or greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide to create the effect,” said BST Managing Director John Coller. “We have devised a system that produces smoke and fog but just uses water – Koolfog™. Koolfog is REAL fog, just water and nothing else, so it is environmentally friendly and has no consumables – other than water. Our flame simulation system Fake Flame™ also uses water in the form of steam to create flame and fire effects without the use of fossil fuels such as propane or paraffins. These innovative effects are not only better for the environment, but they are more cost-effective and help theme parks improve their carbon footprint,” he added. From wooden rollercoaster Wicker Man at Alton Towers, to ICON at Blackpool Pleasure Beach to Croc Drop at Chessington World Of Adventures, BST has worked with theme parks across the world to deliver memorable experiences for their guests. Now, with John’s experience of over 35 years in the fireworks and special effects industry, BST can deliver the same experiences, but in an environmentally-friendly way. BST will be delighting the thousands of attendees from across the globe as they descend on London’s ExCeL for IAAPA’s Expo Europe, a major event which is shining the spotlight firmly on the recovering tourism industry in this special Jubilee year for the UK, and putting London at the heart of Europe’s leisure industry in 2022. Returning to London for the first time since 2011, and with a jam-packed programme full of the latest technology from across the globe, IAAPA is set to deliver one of the best Expos yet, with guests able to network with colleagues, explore the latest developments in the industry, discover new products and services and expand their knowledge with the help and support of industry experts. Building, Design and Construction Magazine | The Home of Construction and Property News

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