BDC

Search
BDC Magazine

bridges

Winvic awarded emergency bridge repair project under national highways SDF

Winvic Construction Ltd, a leading main contractor that specialises in the design and delivery of multi-sector construction and civil engineering projects, has been given its first contract within National Highways’ new Scheme Delivery Framework (SDF). Routine investigations to the M62 Ouse Bridge, located between Goole and Howden in Yorkshire –

Read More »

Spencer Group to begin unique temporary walkway works on heritage bridge

Industry leading multi-disciplinary bridge works specialist Spencer Group has come up with a unique method to carry out essential works on an historic structure. Spencer Group is carrying out the design, construction, installation and maintenance of a temporary walkway for Grade II listed Connel Bridge, in Scotland, ahead of major

Read More »

Knight Architects’ active mobility bridge granted planning permission for Cambridgeshire development

Knight Architects’ design for a new bridge has been granted planning permission as part of Urban&Civic’s extraordinary vision for Waterbeach Barracks in Cambridgeshire. The transport infrastructure throughout the 716-acre site will embody the wider development’s well-connected, sustainable and landscape-led design approach, with Knight Architects’ unique bridge across the A10 supporting

Read More »

GRAHAM awarded Busway Bridge works for Belfast Transport Hub

Civil engineering specialist GRAHAM has been appointed to deliver the new Busway Bridge as part of the Belfast Transport Hub. The project will see alterations to the existing Translink Busway route which runs into the Europa BusCentre and will also enable the Belfast Transport Hub’s main works contractor to construct

Read More »

Doka, the art of Engineering ‘Building Bridges’

People tend to cross bridges as quickly as possible; because you never know. Experts even have a term for this phenomenon: gephyrophobia or “bridge anxiety”. Yet these valley-spanning structures are true expressions of supreme engineering skill, as illustrated by the new Aftetal bridge in North Rhine-Westphalia. It’s a common enough

Read More »
Pedestrian Bridge in Docklands Wins Public Approval

Pedestrian Bridge in Docklands Wins Public Approval

South Dock Bridge, a new pedestrian bridge in London’s Docklands, has received substantial public backing at recent consultation. Designed by Knight Architects, Arcadis, and Kgal for the London Borough of Tower Hamlets (LBTH), the proposed bridge will support increased volumes of pedestrian traffic which are predicted with the expansion of

Read More »

Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

bridges

Winvic awarded emergency bridge repair project under national highways SDF

Winvic Construction Ltd, a leading main contractor that specialises in the design and delivery of multi-sector construction and civil engineering projects, has been given its first contract within National Highways’ new Scheme Delivery Framework (SDF). Routine investigations to the M62 Ouse Bridge, located between Goole and Howden in Yorkshire – or between junctions 36 and 37 of the M62 – identified a partial failure of a joint on the eastbound carriageway. Therefore, Winvic has been appointed as one of the organisations on the SDF undertaking temporary and then permanent repairs on the structure and highway. It was discovered that increased vibration from traffic had started to damage the concrete under lane three and a bridge joint, which allows the carriageway to expand and contract with the weather. A contraflow was immediately put into place, reducing traffic on the eastbound carriage to one lane, to allow temporary works to begin, while a series of overnight road closures during the week commencing 13 June facilitated a second eastbound traffic lane to open on Saturday 18 June minimising disruption to road users. Winvic installed temporary metal bridging plates across parts of the eastbound carriageway, which enabled a further eastbound lane and the eastbound exit slip road at junction 37 to be reopened on Friday 8 July.   Winvic has employed its ‘one-team’ approach and is working closely with a number of National Highways project partners; Jacobs is designing the repairs, traffic management is being led by Amey and Winvic, along with specialist Contractor VSL, is heading the joint repair and replacement. Together the companies are currently working on the complex design process required to replace all eight joints across both carriageways towards a solution that reduces the need for full closures in the future as much as possible. Temporary bridging plates have been installed over the damaged bridge joints as a temporary mitigation measure, and a second set will be added this autumn. The two most critically damaged joints on the eastbound carriageway will be replaced by spring 2023 and the project will be fully complete in Autumn 2023. Winvic won its place on the National Highways SDF in September, along with 49 other contractors that will deliver £3.6 billion of road renewal works on England’s motorways and trunk roads over the next six years. Rob Cook, Winvic’s Director of Civils and Infrastructure, commented: “We have been working hard with National Highways and the Yorkshire North East region to mobilise the Scheme Delivery Framework since we were awarded our place on it in September, so we were able to mobilise rapidly on this project on the M62 Ouse Bridge to begin the necessary immediate temporary works. We put multiple interfaces in place with the National Highway team and the other project partners, so we could work as one-team, towards one-goal with safety as the ultimate priority. “The surfacing and bridging plate works have met programme expectations, meaning road users have been able to go back to using multiple carriageways and the programme is in place to install more plates this Autumn; while the priority always must be safety, it’s also crucial that disruptions to people’s journeys is minimised as quickly as possible and negate the need for full road closures as much as possible. Once the permanent solution has been fully designed and  fabricated, we will undertake these permanent works, facilitating the long-term safe use of the Ouse Bridge.”  Members of the public can keep up to date about the project and any related traffic disruption, by visiting https://nationalhighways.co.uk/our-work/yorkshire-and-north-east/m62-ouse-bridge/.  Phil Jepps, National Highways Programme Delivery Manager, added: “The temporary repair work around the bridge joint and the permanent replacement of all eight joints on the Ouse Bridge is a very complex project. To complete this as quickly, safely and effectively as possible, it’s important we work with outstanding partners who share our commitment to working towards the highest possible standards. We would like to thank Winvic and our other partners on the Scheme Delivery Framework for their ongoing support to keep traffic moving safely while completing the vital resurfacing and bridging plate work.” For more information on essential safety work taking place on Ouse Bridge, visit the National Highways dedicated web page for the bridge https://nationalhighways.co.uk/our-roads/yorkshire-and-north-east/m62-ouse-bridge/ or follow National Highways Yorkshire on Facebook. Winvic will be attending the Highways UK event at The NEC, Birmingham, on 2 and 3 of November 2022 – find them at exhibition stand number E6 or contact the firm to pre-book a meeting. For more information on Winvic, the company’s latest project news and job vacancies please visit www.winvic.co.uk. Join Winvic on social media – visit Twitter @WinvicLtd – and LinkedIn.  

Read More »

Spencer Group to complete major refurbishment works on historic bridge ahead of 200th anniversary

Bridge works specialist Spencer Group has further strengthened its credentials after being selected to revitalise an historic crossing ahead of the structure’s 200th anniversary year. Spencer Group, which has carried out maintenance and repair works on some of the UK’s most iconic bridges, has been awarded a series of contracts for further major refurbishment works on the Menai Suspension Bridge as it approaches its bicentenary in 2026. The Grade I listed structure is the second oldest operational vehicular suspension bridge in the world. Opened in 1826, it crosses the Menai Strait between the island of Anglesey and mainland North Wales. The primary focus of the work includes a £1.5m restoration project to repaint the entire main span underdeck of the 417m-long bridge. Working on behalf of client UK Highways A55 Ltd, Hull-based Spencer Group has designed bespoke moving gantry platforms to enable its team to access the currently unreachable main span underdeck in order to shotblast, inspect and repaint the area. The works will begin once designs are complete and environmental approvals have been granted, as the Menai Strait is protected as a Special Site of Scientific Interest (SSSI) and a wetland area of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. In addition, Spencer Group has been appointed to strengthen the handrails of the pedestrian walkways on the approach spans to both sides of the bridge. Early designs and trials are underway as the team works with heritage organisations to ensure designs meet requirements in keeping with a Grade I listed structure. The works are targeted to be complete by late 2022. A further project will see Spencer Group replace the majority of the vertical road deck hangers, which suspend the deck from the main chains of the bridge. Due to run throughout summer 2023, the project is in the early design stages as the Spencer Group team assesses various methods for hanger replacement and off-site manufacture of specialist components. A fourth project will involve Spencer Group upgrading and improving the bridge’s street and decorative lighting, installing a more modern, efficient and environmentally friendly LED system. Survey work for the scheme was completed earlier this year and Spencer Group trialled illuminating the Anglesey arch of the bridge, with UK Highways A55 Ltd inviting key stakeholders and members of the local community to view the lighting and share their feedback. Spencer Group is now working with UK Highways A55 Ltd to develop and agree the final specification for the lighting project, which will begin later this year. While a completion date has yet to be agreed, the light installation phase will begin in 2023. The latest contract wins come after Spencer Group successfully completed a project to remove, replace and then resurface the footway panels on the approach spans on both sides of the bridge. Luke Fisher, Sector Lead for Bridges and Structures at Spencer Group, said: “We’re delighted to play a significant part in preparing the Menai Suspension Bridge for its 200th anniversary, supporting UK Highways A55 Ltd and their client, the Welsh Government, to ensure this remarkable structure looks its best for its bicentenary year and beyond. “UK Highways A55 Ltd identified that the bridge is suffering from corrosion and needs repainting. For the underdeck painting scheme, we designed the moving gantry platforms, which are unique to this project, and our industry-leading capabilities in this sector formed a significant part of the bid. “We’re proud to have been awarded these contracts and to be given the opportunity to further demonstrate our ability to find innovative solutions to complex challenges of this nature. “We’re also supporting the Menai Heritage Museum in Anglesey to raise awareness of both bridges over the Menai Strait, as well as the importance of civil engineering among local school pupils and college students. We’re giving talks and leading bridge walks to inspire the next generation.” Spencer Group also facilitated a successful visit from Ed McCann, President of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE), and Deborah Sims, former President of the Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT), to the Menai Suspension Bridge in July, enabling positive discussions about the current projects and the history of the bridge. Kerry Evans, Operations Manager for UK Highways A55 Ltd, said: “As we prepare for the 200th anniversary of this magnificent structure, a series of major maintenance projects are in development. “UK Highways A55 Ltd is looking forward to working with the team at Spencer Group again as we embark on the underdeck painting works and the replacement hanger project.” To find out more about Spencer Group’s bridges expertise visit www.thespencergroup.co.uk/our-work/bridges/

Read More »

Winvic Successfully Installs New Steel Arch Footbridge Over the A38 Near Sutton Coldfield

A38 opened 12 hours earlier than scheduled Between Friday 22 and Sunday 24 July, Winvic Construction Ltd, a leading Main Contractor that specialises in the design and delivery of multi-sector construction and civil engineering projects, erected a new pedestrian bridge over the A38 as part of its Peddimore project, being delivered for IM Properties. IM Properties is Birmingham City Council’s development partner for the first phase of Peddimore, which comprises all infrastructure works and the development of 37-hectares of the 71-hectare site. The civils and infrastructure project at Minworth, close to Sutton Coldfield, is to enable a major employment park. The steel tied arch footbridge has a 60-metre span, is 6.5 metres wide and the arch peaks at 20 metres above the highway. It was manufactured off site and then transported to Minworth in three deck sections and three arch sections approximately four weeks ago. It was assembled in an off-line area adjacent to the new 75 metre diameter roundabout that Winvic has also been constructing as part of the scheme. The roundabout and bridge can be seen on the Peddimore Winvic Live feed and a video of the weekend installation can be found on Winvic’s YouTube. On the morning of Friday 22, the Winvic team tandem lifted the 90-tonne structure with two mobile cranes – one 330-tonne and one 220 tonne – on to six Self-Propelled Modular Transporters (SPMT). Traffic management was put in place from 6pm that evening and at 8pm when the road was closed to traffic the installation could begin. The SPMTs were controlled remotely, moving the structure into place on to the concrete abutments and temporary jacks by midnight, and through the night the structure’s bearings were secured and grouted. The temporary compressive struts and hangers were removed in sequence throughout the day on Saturday. Between 4pm and 4am on Sunday 24 July, 18 permanent, stainless-steel finish Total Macalloy Struts were individually torqued and tensioned to a predetermined load before being fine-tuned. The footbridge installation programme was planned meticulously by Winvic, not least because further works to the bridge could be undertaken until 10 August, due to a three-week embargo on road closures for the Commonwealth Games, being held in Birmingham. With completion of the Peddimore infrastructure project scheduled for summer, any postponement with the bridge would delay handover. The timescales also meant that no lead-time could be lost, but the UK’s record-temperatures also presented challenging conditions for operatives. Therefore, the site team made the decision to begin work at 5am each day so activities could still be carried to programme out before temperatures increased in the afternoons.  The Winvic team completed the works ahead of schedule and the road was re-opened 12 hours earlier than expected, at 5.30pm on Sunday 24 July. This week, Winvic will begin the construction a permanent footpath, east of the bridge, to the Peddimore site as well as a temporary footpath on the west side of the bridge, which will meet with Walmley Ash Lane. The bridge and pathways will give residents pedestrian access over the A38 into Minworth and forms part of the green travel planning for the scheme. The other focus areas during the final five weeks of the scheme are installing access steps, handrailing, cabling and lighting, undertaking a secondary reinforced concrete cast to the bridge abutments, backfilling the abutments and approach ramps and completing the drainage and ducting connections. Rob Cook, Winvic’s Director of Civils and Infrastructure, commented: “Our scenario planning, programme management, health and safety preparations and liaison with Birmingham City Council have led to a very successful weekend at IM Properties Peddimore project. Every step of the footbridge installation – from lifting it on to the SPMTs to putting it in place over the highway to fitting the struts – went to plan; in fact, so well, we were able to open the A38 twelve hours earlier than scheduled. It was a true team effort and numerous specialist subcontractors proved themselves to be leaders in their fields.  “There was no room in error with the timings, or our upcoming agreed handover date to IM Properties could not be met due to the embargo on road closures during the Commonwealth Games. The soaring temperatures certainly didn’t help in the run-up and I’d like to give special thanks to the whole Peddimore team who went above and beyond, starting work extra early so tasks could be completed before temperatures increased in the afternoon. With the bridge in place, we’re on track for handover towards the end of summer.” Andy Reynolds, Project Director for IM Properties added: “Winvic Construction Ltd, is a trusted partner in our supply chain and having worked with them across a number of our schemes, they have continually demonstrated their commitment to meeting deadlines and ensuring a partnership approach is taken when liaising with key stakeholders and the local community to work considerately and minimise disruption. “The success of the bridge works is testament to the professionalism and determination of the whole team to plan and execute a complex and time critical operation of this nature. Working in difficult conditions, they really excelled themselves and they have once again underlined why we selected them to deliver one of the UK’s largest manufacturing and logistics schemes.” Winvic praised a number of specialist subcontractors that worked as one team with Winvic to successfully deliver the bridge works, including Carver Engineering Services, Mammoet, USL Ekspan and Rubix. For more information on Winvic, the company’s latest project news and job vacancies please visit www.winvic.co.uk. Join Winvic on social media – visit Twitter @WinvicLtd – and LinkedIn.  

Read More »

Spencer Group to begin unique temporary walkway works on heritage bridge

Industry leading multi-disciplinary bridge works specialist Spencer Group has come up with a unique method to carry out essential works on an historic structure. Spencer Group is carrying out the design, construction, installation and maintenance of a temporary walkway for Grade II listed Connel Bridge, in Scotland, ahead of major deck replacement works. The walkway, which will be cantilevered off the east side of the bridge, will allow for pedestrian and cyclist access during the works to replace the entire deck, which will take place over the course of the next two years. The walkway is expected to be completed in four months, with the possibility of retaining the facility depending on a feasibility study and full public consultation. The walkway construction has been programmed to cause minimal disruption to traffic and the local community. The A828 Connel Bridge was the second largest cantilever bridge in Europe when it was built by Sir William Arrol in 1903. It links the villages of Connel and North Connel, close to Oban. Originally a railway bridge, it was used for both rail and road traffic from 1914, until the railway closed in 1966. The new steel walkway design will be in-keeping with the heritage of the bridge, with Spencer Group also self-delivering integrated street lighting. Spencer Group is carrying out the project for BEAR Scotland, a service provider in the Scottish roads maintenance sector, on behalf of the national transport agency for Scotland, Transport Scotland. The temporary walkway is part of the critical enabling works ahead of the deck replacement scheme and Spencer Group, which specialises in providing innovative solutions to complex engineering projects, is mitigating the impact the walkway works will have on traffic and the local community. Luke Fisher, Sector Lead for Bridges and Structures at Spencer Group, said: “We’re delighted to have been selected to carry out this important project, which is the latest in our growing portfolio of heritage bridge works. “During the tender process, we focused our proposals on a sympathetic walkway design and methodologies that reduced traffic management during the construction works. “Our designers proposed a traditional steel walkway design that was in-keeping with the heritage of the bridge, clamping to the existing structure where possible, to minimise invasive construction works to the bridge interface points. “A key element of the project is also to minimise the impact on local residents and traffic, both on Connel Bridge and on the A85 below. “The original design intent was to install support brackets over the side of the masonry viaducts that would require rope access for installation, meaning traffic management would have needed to be in place on the A85. “We’ve come up with an alternative design solution that mitigates this, with brackets that can be installed from the confines of the bridge parapets. In addition, we’ve developed an installation methodology that allows our teams to install the new walkway progressively from the leading edge, almost eliminating the requirement for traffic management on the bridge during the works.” Eddie Ross, BEAR Scotland’s North West Representative, said: “We appreciate the historical importance of the A828 Connel Bridge and the vital transport link it provides to local communities. “This project will allow teams to install a temporary footway on the east side of Connel Bridge, in advance of the deck replacement works which are scheduled to take place next year. The temporary walkway will maintain a route across the bridge whilst the bridge deck is replaced, as we will need to close the existing footpath and carriageway. “Alongside Transport Scotland, we are currently considering making the walkway a permanent facility and will carry out a feasibility study of the options available, which will include consultation with all key stakeholders.” Spencer Group delivers innovative engineering and construction solutions in the transport, infrastructure, materials handling, energy and industrial sectors. For further information about Spencer Group’s extensive bridge project capabilities, visit https://thespencergroup.co.uk/our-work/bridges/.

Read More »

GRAHAM awarded £16m construction phase of Chelmsford Bridge and Highway scheme

Civil engineering specialist firm GRAHAM has been appointed as the Principal Contractor to deliver a new bridge and link road as part of the Chelmsford East Beaulieu S278 Works (RDR Phase 3) project. The £16.77m project will connect the A130 Essex Regiment Way and the Beaulieu and Channels housing developments on the west side of the Great Eastern Main Line (GEML) railway lines to the A12 Boreham interchange on the east side of the railway. The scheme will see the delivery of new highways infrastructure to facilitate future phases of development at the Beaulieu Development in Chelmsford for the client Countryside and L&Q. The works comprise of a new three-span bridge over the Great Eastern Main Line railway and A12 slip-road; and approach embankments on either side linking into the new Radial Distributor Road (RDR) and the existing Boreham Interchange. The infrastructure will also form part of a local bus route and the principal HGV traffic route between the A12 and Braintree and provide a link between the proposed new Beaulieu railway station on the east side of the railway. GRAHAM has already delivered the pre-construction phase of the contract, which required a fully coordinated design and installation methodology to meet the approval and standards of Highways England and Network Rail. As part of the contract, GRAHAM will provide the construction of a range of new highway infrastructure, including: A new three-span highway bridge structure  Piling Earthworks Soil retaining walls Bearings Stormwater (SUDS) drainage Road construction to include provision for pedestrians  Traffic signs and road markings  Traffic signal loops  Street lighting Fencing Vehicle restraint systems. Utility ducts Temporary works Other ancillary works Coordination with and programming of the works of statutory undertakers to carry out required diversion/protection works on the public highway All associated Traffic Management Works The new Beaulieu Rail Bridge will be a 161m long three-span structure of composite weathering steel fabricated plate girders on in-situ reinforced concrete column abutments and piers, with reinforced concrete pile-caps and bored cast in place reinforced concrete piles. The girders will be a constant depth over their full length. The superstructure will be constructed on site, off-line on adjacent land. GRAHAM will carry out the installation by raising the complete superstructure using Self Propelled Modular Transporters (SPMT) which will carry it to its final position before lowering it onto the permanent bearings. This methodology has been used by GRAHAM successfully on previous bridge installations, notably on the Carpenter’s Land Bridge in 2020, a project that linked London’s East Bank to its International Quarter. GRAHAM has a proven track record in the Chelmsford area having completed the award-winning A138 Chelmer Viaduct – a £32m strategic highway, which has increased transport capacity and significantly improved journeys for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians. Discussing the award of this next phase of works, GRAHAM Managing Director Leo Martin said: “Following our appointment to design the bridge for this scheme under a Stage 1 Pre-construction Services contract which focused on optioneering, outline design and detailed design development, we were delighted to secure the build phase for the Chelmsford East Beaulieu S278 Works. “The use of SPMTs to install the complete bridge rather than the traditional usage of a crane is an example of our innovative approach to civil engineering infrastructure projects and this methodology will help us install the new superstructure in the safest and most efficient manner. Leo added: “We’re thrilled to be delivering another important infrastructure scheme in the Chelmsford region following our work on the award-winning A138 Chelmer Viaduct. The Chelmsford East Beaulieu S278 works will provide important new transport links for the Beaulieu and Channels housing developments to the A12 Boreham Interchange, as well local bus and HGV routes between the A12 and Braintree. The project is another excellent opportunity for our team to show its capabilities in both the highways and rail sectors.” Work on the Chelmsford East Beaulieu S278 (RDR Phase 3) project is currently underway with an anticipated completion date in Spring 2023.

Read More »

Knight Architects’ active mobility bridge granted planning permission for Cambridgeshire development

Knight Architects’ design for a new bridge has been granted planning permission as part of Urban&Civic’s extraordinary vision for Waterbeach Barracks in Cambridgeshire. The transport infrastructure throughout the 716-acre site will embody the wider development’s well-connected, sustainable and landscape-led design approach, with Knight Architects’ unique bridge across the A10 supporting active mobility along the Mere Way cycleway for pedestrians, cyclists and equestrians. The new bridge will provide a distinctive architectural landmark for the development. The simple, elegant form reaches down to ground level at the entrance to the Barracks in a graceful sweep. The structure is instantly recognisable from the A10, the main road which runs parallel to the western edge of the development. It connects seamlessly with the active mobility routes either side of the bridge which represent a multi-million pound investment to upgrade a historic Right of Way into a new active mobility connection to one of Cambridge’s largest employment centres – the Cambridge Science Park. The form of the bridge pays homage to both the aviation history at Waterbeach and the natural landscape in the area, while the contrasting use of white and dark grey in the sculpted edge beams and deck / parapet sections respectively help to accentuate the bridge’s silhouette. The bridge sits modestly in the low fen-edge landscape, minimising impacts on the environment and has been arranged to respect the ancient Roman drainage and canal system of Car Dyke and Old Tillage, which run parallel to the A10. The approaches to the bridge are designed as gently sloped and vegetated embankments, blending the structure with the immediate landscape and providing users with an accessible, comfortable and enjoyable experience as they cross the bridge. Knight Architects Associate and project architect, Laura Langridge comments: “Our contextual and place-making design will form a fitting and recognisable entrance to the new Waterbeach development whilst supporting the sustainable aims of improving active mobility for this exciting neighbourhood and the wider community. We are excited to see it progress to installation next Spring.’’ Caroline Foster, Project Director for Waterbeach at Urban&Civic, added: “The new A10 bridge highlights our vision, commitment to and investment in sustainable transport. Not only will it provide a robust connection for the new cycle connection to the Science Park for future commuters, but it will also support connections between Waterbeach and Landbeach to help local people access the new services and amenities coming forward within the development in a sustainable way. We’re delighted to have secured planning for this elegant structure and excited about making sure its delivery is a key part of the sustainable delivery of the new community.”

Read More »

GRAHAM awarded Busway Bridge works for Belfast Transport Hub

Civil engineering specialist GRAHAM has been appointed to deliver the new Busway Bridge as part of the Belfast Transport Hub. The project will see alterations to the existing Translink Busway route which runs into the Europa BusCentre and will also enable the Belfast Transport Hub’s main works contractor to construct the new integrated bus and rail infrastructure. This important Busway Bridge project will see GRAHAM’s civil engineering team install a new weathered steel bridge. The multi-million-pound Belfast Transport Hub regeneration project is a NI Executive Flagship project. Once complete, it will see the transformation of an 8-hectare city-centre site, delivering a modern high-quality integrated transport hub to enhance local and international connectivity with bus, coach, and rail links across Northern Ireland and beyond. It will also have a key environmental role in helping to attract more people to public transport, reducing congestion and air pollution in the region. The project will be a key driver of social, economic and environmental wellbeing for Belfast and Northern Ireland and will be at the heart of a new city neighbourhood called ‘Weavers Cross’ with imaginative mixed-use development proposals. Discussing the contract award, GRAHAM’s Contracts Director Andrew Henry said: “We’re pleased to have been awarded this additional package of works on the Belfast Transport Hub scheme, which will facilitate the wider construction of the Hub. “We have an excellent existing relationship with our client Translink, having successfully collaborated on several high-profile schemes including a new train maintenance facility at Adelaide Depot and the new Portrush Train Station, which have both brought major benefits to the areas they serve. “As experts in the field of civil engineering our teams will be on hand to deliver the new busway bridge safely and efficiently and to support the completion of the new train and bus deport by the main works contractor. We’re looking forward to playing our part in this transformational scheme and leaving a lasting legacy for transport in the city of Belfast. “ Lisa McFadden, Programme Manager, Belfast Transport Hub, said: “We are looking forward to working with GRAHAM on the construction of the Busway Bridge, an integral part of the exciting new Belfast Transport Hub Project. “Completion of this package of work will enable us to deliver our next stage of bus and rail infrastructure, future proofing our facilities, enhancing operational and passenger experience, creating smarter sustainable transport options and ensuring that Translink continues to be first choice for travel, for today, for tomorrow.”

Read More »

MCI® Technology Applied on Peljesac Bridge Providing Road Link Between Two Parts of the Country!

Ranking among the most demanding bridges in the world—not only in terms of complexity of construction but also in a complex design—2,404-m (7,887.14-ft) long, Peljesac bridge is one of the most important and largest infrastructure project in Europe. Connecting Croatia’s Peljesac peninsula with the mainland to bypass a short stretch of the Bosnia and Herzegovina coastline started three years ago. The project is worth 550 Million Euros, although most of the funding came from the European Union. ln order to meet the main criteria of quality design, such as stability, durability, economy, and integration into the environment, the inventive design proposed the construction of an extra dosed bridge with an integrated hybrid structure comprising of five central spans, each 285-m long, and six low pylons.  Especially careful approach was taken to ensure durability for the extended lifespan of over 130 years. Cortec’s MCI® 2018 was specified on this project during the design phase as a silane-based impregnation with a migrating inhibitor property to protect against the harmful effects of corrosion, thus extending the service life of the bridge. MCI® 2018 is a 100% silane-based concrete sealer containing migrating corrosion inhibitors that allows deep penetration into concrete and provides water repellence by chemically reacting with the cementitious substrate. It seals surface pores, preventing the intrusion of chlorides, reduces carbonation, and protects from the ingress of wind-driven rain. Treated concrete surfaces are fully breathable and their natural moisture-vapor transmission is not affected. After repair of surface damage and cleaning of discolorations and other surface defects, the concrete surface of the pylons needed to be protected with a colorless silane coating to improve durability and increase the resistance of the concrete surface to long-term external influences. MCI®-2018 carries CE certification that indicates conformity with health, safety and environmental protection standards for products sold within the European Economic Area (EEA). Application of MCI®-2018 A combination of AC coatings, cathodic protection of steel reinforcement in piles and pile heads, a concrete cover of 65–85 mm stainless steel reinforcement and impregnation of all concrete surfaces with MCI®-2018 was chosen as the strategy to help the bridge achieve a 130-year service life. MCI®-2018 was applied on the entire substructure of the bridge. All concrete parts were coated with MCI®-2018 by a spraying technique. The work was performed in accordance with the project requirements and after surface preparation to full functionality. This included: Access to pylons Rehabilitation of the concrete surface of the pylons Cleaning the concrete surface of the pylon (washing the pillars with water) Impregnation of the concrete surface of the pylon with MCI®-2018. MCI®-2018 contains time-proven Migrating Corrosion Inhibitors (MCI®). The silane component provides water repellency by chemically reacting with the cementitious substrate under proper application, decreasing the ingress of aggressive materials. The product penetrates deep into concrete, providing corrosion protection to reinforcing steel from existing water and chloride ions, or other contaminants. For the Peljesac bridge, continuous monitoring of the condition of the structure at one central place will be done during the construction phase and the exploitation phase to examine parameters of structural behavior, time, seismic activity, and structural durability. The designer of the bridge specified corrosion protection for all concrete segments in order to achieve a 130-year service life. After completion, the Peljesac Bridge will be ranked among the five largest and most attractive European bridges, constructed at the beginning of 21st century. This important new structure is connecting two separate parts of Croatia and bypassing border crossings at the short coastal strip near Neum in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Cortec’s CEO, Boris Miksic, Croatian-American businessman is proud that his patented technology was used on this historic project to connect two parts of his country. “Our MCI® technology is used in largest construction projects throughout the globe. I dedicated more than forty years of my life in developing most advanced, environmentally safe corrosion protection solutions. Witnessing its application in my home country on this monumental bridge structure is truly a special feeling. Croatia has gone through some tough times, having to fight its independence in a war 30 years ago. Seeing it prosper and develop in of the most desirable countries in Europe feels just about right and completion of Peljesac bridge is huge step forward for all of us.”   You can learn more about Migrating Corrosion Inhibitors (MCI®) here: https://www.cortecmci.com/

Read More »

Doka, the art of Engineering ‘Building Bridges’

People tend to cross bridges as quickly as possible; because you never know. Experts even have a term for this phenomenon: gephyrophobia or “bridge anxiety”. Yet these valley-spanning structures are true expressions of supreme engineering skill, as illustrated by the new Aftetal bridge in North Rhine-Westphalia. It’s a common enough experience for all motorists: you reduce your speed, see a warning sign for slippery roads or side winds, plus the obligatory windsock – followed by the brief rattle of the transitions, which cause a slight bump in the road. That’s usually all you notice of a bridge. Travellers are rarely able to appreciate their true beauty. Who knows the name of a bridge, let alone the names of the companies involved in its construction? Probably only a handful of people are familiar with the team around Matthias Urban and Markus Mühlnickel from formwork expert Doka – although they are actually always on hand wherever a complex bridge project involving concrete is underway in Germany. This is true, regardless of whether the bridge in question uses cantilevering, incremental launching or launching-girder equipment/load-bearing systems. An impressive example is the steel-concrete colossus named the Aftetal bridge – almost 800 meters long, with around 66 metres high piers, some of them at distances of up to 120 meters. It is a valley bridge, which aims to ease the traffic situation in the Westphalian town of Bad Wünnenberg and facilitate travel between Brilon and Paderborn in the long run. Matthias Urban, the project manager, emphasises: “It is an imposing, very long and wide bridge, and the piers are very massive. You don’t get that very often.” And that says a lot: After all, Doka has been supplying equipment and engineering expertise for cross-valley and cross-river traffic routes such as the Lahntal, the Nuttlar, Pfädchensgraben or Tiefenbach bridge for some time now. Even after 15 and 27 years respectively on the job, the engineers stress, “our department is passionate about bridges”. Markus Mühlnickel, the group leader, quotes Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, who wrote about the importance of teaching people to long for the infinite, vast sea, if you want them to build a ship. This is probably also true if you want to build a bridge: it is best to keep the image of free-flowing traffic in mind right from the start. This is how you encourage motivation and enthusiasm. A bridge, says the engineer, is always a prominent feature and decisively shapes the landscape. It feels wonderful to watch it grow and ultimately create connections between places and people. “Bridges are classic civil engineering,” says Urban, because they usually consist of abutments and piers, pier heads and a superstructure. Nevertheless, they only look alike at first glance. When you take a closer look, they actually entail quite different engineering technologies. And with the complexity of the bridge geometry, formwork requirements grow. From this perspective, the Aftetal bridge is one of the more challenging constructions – with its height, the complex geometry of its piers, the massive pier heads and not least because of its length and span. In principle, engineers tend to rely on standard systems for such a project as well. However, some aspects will always need individual solutions. Urban mentions the special engineering skills required for bridges and the special solutions and interface planning, which are indispensable at this level. A good formwork supplier does more than just supply components and systems. They also know how to make the most of its potential for the project at hand. It’s all about process, deadline and cost certainty. “Clients often give us their plans and expect that we already have a ready-made solution up our sleeves,” adds Mühlnickel. But for a bridge like this, there are no ready-made solutions. You have to sit down with the project partners, involve the team, plan, calculate, check, revise, meet again and continue to coordinate. “It’s about arriving at the best solution, which is ideally also the safest,” says Mühlnickel. “At the end of the day, the workers want to return home safely to their families.” After all, it’s not only about averting the risk of falling, it is also important to ensure that the equipment is ergonomic and minimises physical strain. It is up to Doka to provide its partners with good advice, and to show the advantages and disadvantages of various methods, to make the right decisions with regard to provision and operating time. On top of that, we must design solutions that are safe for life and limb – a “return on prevention”, as it is called in technical jargon. Studies have shown that every euro invested in safe and ergonomic working conditions pays off twice or three time over. In other words, before an actual bridge is built, we have to build interpersonal bridges. Only in this way great things – such as the Aftetal bridge – can happen. In the case of the massive piers, the responsible construction company Max Bögl relied on the principle of automatic climbing formwork. The high-performance, fully hydraulic system from Doka climbed accurately and precisely, every step of the way. The distances climbed were always between five and six meters, up to the V-shaped pier heads, which required another special solution from the formwork experts. This is where the formwork preassembly team came into play. This Doka service pays off especially in the case of exceptional assembly activities, for example when assembling and dismantling or moving the formwork from one pier head to the next – especially since the in-house Doka service results in fewer interfaces and coordination work at the construction site. This is particularly relevant since, in addition to cost savings, it is always the time factor that makes project partners more open to innovative or unconventional solutions. For example, Max Bögl used two composite forming carriages at the Aftetal bridge to join the steel trough with the concrete of the deck slab. To create the cantilevered parapets with parapet wall, a composite forming carriage with two

Read More »
Pedestrian Bridge in Docklands Wins Public Approval

Pedestrian Bridge in Docklands Wins Public Approval

South Dock Bridge, a new pedestrian bridge in London’s Docklands, has received substantial public backing at recent consultation. Designed by Knight Architects, Arcadis, and Kgal for the London Borough of Tower Hamlets (LBTH), the proposed bridge will support increased volumes of pedestrian traffic which are predicted with the expansion of the Isle of Dogs. Once completed, it is expected to become one of the busiest pedestrian bridges in London. The Isle of Dogs in east London has been a major trading centre beside the River Thames for almost two hundred years, with Canary Wharf – one of the UK’s main financial centres – located here since 1980. The South Dock is one of two surviving docks and acts as a boundary between Canary Wharf and South Quay. The large volume of new development on the Isle of Dogs will increase predicted pedestrian traffic above levels that can be comfortably accommodated with existing infrastructure and the new pedestrian bridge has been proposed to support this expansion. The new bridge will improve walkable connections between existing public open spaces, like Jubilee Park, with proposed development in the area and local public transport interchanges such as the new Elizabeth line station (Crossrail) and the South Quay DLR station. It is also anticipated to improve access to jobs, retail, and other services at Canary Wharf. Following feedback from the RIBA Stage 2 Public Consultation (in 2018), a six-week second Public Consultation was held on the developed design for South Dock Bridge, between August and October 2020. The purpose of this new consultation, led by Knight Architects in close collaboration with LBTH, was to present the new design of the bridge and how it responded to the feedback from the previous consultation, before submitting a planning application. The consultation, to guarantee everyone interested would have the opportunity to provide their feedback during the Covid-19 pandemic, combined online events, public exhibitions and a specifically created website. The new design painstakingly builds on the feedback received in the Stage 2 consultation, which sought for a bridge that was elegant, unobtrusive, contemporary, with a neutral finish, and that somehow responded to the industrial heritage of the area. The proposed bridge has been excellently received and supported by a clear majority of the respondents who praised the bridge design and felt their earlier feedback had been addressed and responded to. The bridge has been designed as a sculpted two-span variable-depth steel beam with a single central pier in the dock. Each of these spans is approximately 35m long. The bridge provides a permanent 15m-wide and 3m-high navigable channel for smaller boats to pass underneath and, thanks to a movable (bascule) north span, a 25m wide channel without height restriction for taller ships. The deck width varies from 7.8m at the south end to 15.4m at the north one. A triangular void in the movable span directs people away from an existing emergency staircase serving the buildings located on axis at the north end of the crossing. The north abutment hosts the drive mechanism and a concealed counterweight that balances the structure to minimise the energy needed to open the bridge. The design is slender, understated, and visually compact. The void created on the main span deck not only guides users and provides an enjoyable crossing experience, but makes the structure more transparent, distinctive and memorable, allowing views through the deck when the bridge is raised. Paying tribute to the history of Canary Wharf, the bridge’s sculptural geometry echoes the curved base of the historic cranes that were once sited along the quays when the site was a commercial port. The main aspirations for the new bridge are for it to improve inclusive transport to support sustainable growth in the Isle of Dogs, contribute to local placemaking and provide a striking, elegant landmark in the area. The planning application has been submitted, and a decision is expected this month. The bridge is expected to start on site in 2022 and open in 2023.

Read More »