BDC

Search
BDC Magazine

roofing

DERBY MARKET HALL MARKS COMPLETION OF ROOF RESTORATION

AFTER undergoing extensive roof and structural restoration assisted by a scaffolding structure weighing more than eight blue whales, the team behind the transformation of Derby’s iconic Market Hall has revealed that the first phase of work has now completed. The Grade II listed Victorian market hall, which has been trading

Read More »

5 Reasons to Choose Felt for a Shed Roof

Sheds are probably the most likely outbuilding you are to see on a property. They have a variety of uses. However, since they are outside the house, waterproofing them is vital, and that means that your roof choice is important. But while many newer alternatives have become available – polycarbonate

Read More »

Klober Invests in Sales Team Ahead of Busy 2022 for UK Roofing

With 92% of UK homeowners planning home renovation projects in 2022, Klober has invested in its sales team to support merchants and installers in 2022 and beyond. The appointments follow reports that 30% of roofing contractors saw their workloads grow in the last quarter of 2021, according to the NFRC’s

Read More »

SIKA PROVIDES WEATHERTIGHT PROTECTION FOR AWARD-WINNING OFFSITE SCHOOL PROJECT

A technically advanced, high-performance, hybrid roofing membrane from global building product manufacturer Sika, provided the watertight finish for a new school which was built using innovative offsite construction techniques. The newly-constructed King Edward VI Northfield School for Girls in Birmingham, which was designed by architect Atkins Global on behalf of

Read More »

SUCCESS FOR WOODHEAD GROUP AS EEM ANNOUNCES NEW PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT FRAMEWORK WINNERS

Robert Woodhead Ltd, part of the Woodhead Group, has capped an impressive start to the year by winning a place on the new Efficiency East Midlands (EEM) Property Improvement Works framework for the next four years.  The framework, which covers both investment and refurbishment schemes, allows the Nottinghamshire-based company to tender for projects from public sector organisations across the East Midlands.  The award is a continuation

Read More »

Detecting Sagging Roofs Early

Have you ever noticed a house whose roof looks curved and drooping instead of straight and wondered what is happening? This is a sagging roof. It can range from a simple problem to a more complicated one where you need a professional. This can be worrying. A little sag does

Read More »

Fall protection cost-cutting: a step too far?

Any work at height carries risk. Preventing accidents from falls relies on all stakeholders using an informed, joined-up approach to practices and systems. Specifiers, contractors, system installers and end-users all play a part in risk mitigation. James Sainsbury, Fall Protection Sales leader for MSA Safety, explains why a holistic approach

Read More »

Roofing Company in Detroit

There are many roofing companies in Detroit, but how do you know if you are getting a quality roofing company for a good price? There are a few key elements to understand and remember before hiring a roofing company in Detroit. This article will discuss the key elements and provide

Read More »

Sika Strengthens Team with Appointment

Sika-Trocal, part of the Sika Group, has appointed a new Area Technical Manager, strengthening its Midlands team by doing so. Donna Owen joins the company from Building Innovation where she held the position as Key Account Management for roofing and tapered insulation. Sika-Trocal provides flat roofing membranes that are suitable

Read More »

ROGUE ROOFERS IDENTIFIED AS BLIGHT ON ‘UNDER-APPRECIATED’ TRADE

A nationwide research survey of roofers revealed that ‘weeding out’ rogue roofers is the most pressing issue for those working in the roofing trade. Almost three quarters (72 percent) of all respondents, in a survey conducted by Chandlers Roofing Supplies say that work by unscrupulous roofers was the top issue

Read More »

Latest Issue

BDC 318 : Jul 2024

roofing

DERBY MARKET HALL MARKS COMPLETION OF ROOF RESTORATION

AFTER undergoing extensive roof and structural restoration assisted by a scaffolding structure weighing more than eight blue whales, the team behind the transformation of Derby’s iconic Market Hall has revealed that the first phase of work has now completed. The Grade II listed Victorian market hall, which has been trading since 1866, will be transformed into a contemporary and vibrant cultural and retail destination. Wates Construction, which has an extensive track record of heritage restoration projects around the UK, has been leading an expert project team of local architects and engineers on the flagship project, comprising Latham Architects, Rogers Leask, and Clancy Consultants. The work completed includes masonry repairs to the building envelope, internal cleaning of the roof structure, and lead paint removal before the challenging and extensive heritage glazed roof replacement works. This included increasing ridge height to accommodate natural ventilation for the building, copper roof replacement, gutter and rainwater works, access equipment, localised electric works, lightening protection, and decoration. John Carlin, Regional Director at Wates Construction, said: “It has been a privilege to work on the restoration and transformation of such an iconic and unique building, maintaining its historic charm but also bringing it into the council’s overall modern vision for the revitalisation of the wider city centre.  “Before this work on the roof was carried out, the Market Hall often had to close to customers for safety reasons if there was possibility of strong winds, snow, or heavy rain in case the glass windows came out of their frames. Along with the extensive restoration of the roof structure, all of these windows have now been replaced, meaning that closing the market and disrupting trade just for weather will no longer be necessary.” “Making sure that trading could continue while initial surveys and work on the roof took place was particularly important. To do this, we installed a scaffolding structure to give access to the roof without disrupting ground level activity. It was an impressive feat of engineering all by itself, which would have spanned more than 62 miles if placed end-to-end and weighed almost 900 tonnes, but it really was the key to making sure trade could continue despite our ongoing work, supporting the city’s traders post-pandemic.” Throughout the process, the project team supported traders and the council project team to a high level, offering tours and site visits, as well as engaging with local sixth-form college students and a range of industry professionals to involve the local community in the project. The team is now looking forward to commencing the second phase of the regeneration programme, which is set for later this year and will focus on internal and external configuration to transform the look and feel of the building. Raised concrete floor plinths that currently house individual market stalls will be removed to create a more airy, open and accessible space, with the ground level intended to provide space for up to 32 market stalls, which will be portable for flexibility. Meanwhile, the interior balcony area will provide an opportunity to accommodate a small business incubator, and to provide space for special themed markets, such as antiques or crafts. The entrances to the Market Hall are also set to be improved in the upcoming phase of work, allowing market activity to flow seamlessly into the surrounding streets and creating an attractive and flexible space in the adjacent Osnabruck Square. The Market Hall is located within Derby’s City Centre Conservation Area, which also contains Derby Cathedral, the Silk Mill, and the Guildhall Theatre, and was originally designed by Derbyshire engineer Rowland Mason Ordish. When completed, it will complement the emerging Cultural Hub, which aims to re-energise the day and night-time economies and drive stronger footfall in the Market Place and wider city centre Councillor Mick Barker, Cabinet Member for Governance and Deputy Leader of Derby City Council, said: “Derby Market Hall is one of the city’s most beautiful and prominent buildings, which connects key areas of our city centre. “As a Grade II listed building, it deserves tasteful and sympathetic attention to detail to its renovation. Quality takes time and we’re delighted to see that this striking copper roof has now been finished, which paves the way for the rest of the Market Hall’s transformation. “Soon we can move onto the internal renovation and give Derby a fantastic market, which is full of life and which will help draw people back into the heart of our city.” Wates Construction was appointed via SCAPE’s Major Works framework. The second phase of development is set to commence on site in Q4 2022, with an aim to complete in 2024. For more information, please visit https://www.wates.co.uk/

Read More »

5 Reasons to Choose Felt for a Shed Roof

Sheds are probably the most likely outbuilding you are to see on a property. They have a variety of uses. However, since they are outside the house, waterproofing them is vital, and that means that your roof choice is important. But while many newer alternatives have become available – polycarbonate sheeting, corrugated sheeting, and EPDM rubber – none of them trump good old shed felt for sheer practicality. Shed felt is made using a bituminous layer for waterproofing and a secondary fibrous layer to provide structure and strength. Whereas in the past this might have been an organic option, nowadays it tends to be a tough synthetic material like polyester. The updated materials let an old solution remain relevant in the modern day.  Durability Shed Felt is hard-wearing. While it’s not quite as durable as say, polycarbonate sheeting, it is not fragile like EPDM and bituminous corrugated sheeting. Not only is it rugged, it also can’t be scratched easily like polycarbonate. This means you won’t need to worry about treating it with kid gloves. Aesthetic Value While a shed is a very utilitarian structure, there’s no reason it can’t also be aesthetically pleasing. Shed felt comes in colours that are bold and reassuring but not garish. Whereas a shed with a corrugated metal roof might appear harsh and intimidating, a shed felt roof looks nostalgic and inviting. If you’re willing to go to the effort of installing the strips, you can even get a lovely tiled appearance with shed felt shingles.  Low Cost Shed felt is as affordable and cheerful as they come. Very few alternatives beat it for price. In terms of how expensive it is to how long it lasts before needing replacement (often as long as ten years) it’s no wonder it’s as popular as it is.  Ease of installation Shed felt doesn’t need glazing bars or complex tools to install. Just a hammer, a utility knife, and some clout nails. If you really want to get fancy you might use adhesive if you live in a windy area. That’s much simpler than having to drill many holes for screws for sheeting, or use an electric saw to cut up polycarbonate. Even relatively inexperienced DIYers can put up a shed felt with a little elbow grease if they follow instructions. Simple to repair This is where shed felt really pulls ahead of comparable materials. Repairing sheeting is difficult, whereas shed felt can be patched easily. All you have to do is cut out a section of damaged felt and patch it with some new felt. Shed felt is durable, so you shouldn’t be repairing it all the time, but when the worst thing happens you can deal with it easily. If a sheet is completely damaged, as we previously mentioned, it’s cheap and easy to install so you can get it up and running in no time without hitting the pocketbook too harshly.   Of course, there may be situations where you decide to go with another material because of unusual or particular circumstances. However, when it comes to an all-terrain shed roofing solution, shed felt simply cannot be beat.

Read More »

Klober Invests in Sales Team Ahead of Busy 2022 for UK Roofing

With 92% of UK homeowners planning home renovation projects in 2022, Klober has invested in its sales team to support merchants and installers in 2022 and beyond. The appointments follow reports that 30% of roofing contractors saw their workloads grow in the last quarter of 2021, according to the NFRC’s State of the Roofing Industry Survey. And this isn’t set to slow, with 43% of roofers anticipating an increase in workload. Hannah Watts joins Klober as an Area Account Manager after discovering her passion for construction as a Field Sales Executive. She will be responsible for the home counties, including Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Warwickshire. “As a market leader in roofing components and accessories, the Klober brand is well respected and renowned for offering quality. I knew this role would bring new challenges and felt that Klober would provide a supportive environment in which to thrive,” said Hannah. “My role as an Area Account Manager will involve operating as a key point of contact for customers and I’m most looking forward to getting under the skin of their businesses to understand their specific requirements and identify opportunities for growth.” Also joining Klober as an Area Account Manager is Joey Hall who will be responsible for East Anglia. “When the opportunity arose to join Klober in this role, it was one I was thrilled to take, particularly as I’ve always been interested in pursuing a position like this,” he explained. “In my first 12 months, I hope to build strong relationships with merchants and work in collaboration to help meet their business goals. I am particularly looking forward to travelling and gaining thorough knowledge of my area.” Commenting on the new appointments, Chris Nicholls, Commercial Director at Klober said: “We take pride in our people as this means our network of merchants and contractors can be confident that they are in good hands. That’s why I’m extremely pleased to have Hannah and Joey on board and excited to see what they achieve.” For more information about Klober, please visit www.klober.co.uk

Read More »

SIKA PROVIDES WEATHERTIGHT PROTECTION FOR AWARD-WINNING OFFSITE SCHOOL PROJECT

A technically advanced, high-performance, hybrid roofing membrane from global building product manufacturer Sika, provided the watertight finish for a new school which was built using innovative offsite construction techniques. The newly-constructed King Edward VI Northfield School for Girls in Birmingham, which was designed by architect Atkins Global on behalf of client Acivico Group, replaces Turves Green Girls’ School. The original establishment was in a poor state of repair and following consultations with the local authority, it was agreed constructing a new school building represented a cost-effective alternative to refurbishment. The new school includes contemporary classrooms, a dance studio, sports hall and a purpose-built library. The building’s airy feel is created by its wide corridors and stairways which are filled with natural light. This will help to inspire a calm and pleasant environment for staff and students. To meet performance and programme goals for the building’s construction, a hybrid design was devised by offsite construction and modular specialists, Innovaré. Such innovation was recognised at the annual Offsite Awards, with Innovaré – in a joint submission with Sika – winning the ‘Best Use of Hybrid Technology’ category for its successful Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA) delivery of the King Edward VI Northfield School construction project.Innovaré’s hybrid system included integrated BBA-Certified i-SIP panels, hollow core concrete plank floors, and a lightweight timber cassette roofing system. This hybrid method of construction, which meant most of the new school structure was manufactured offsite, offered a radically quicker speed of build, reducing preliminary and overall costs. It also ensured the building’s performance and programme goals were met. As a global building product manufacturer with a wide range of products and technical expertise to offer, Sika is ideally placed to support offsite construction projects. Its Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) Division is specifically tasked to work with offsite manufacturing and assembly companies to consider how Sika products could be used as part of the building process in this fast-growing sector. Sika’s 4mm elastomeric and plastomeric bituminous hybrid membrane, SikaBit Pro 940®, provided the watertight finish for the new building’s energy-efficient roofing system, which integrates timber cassettes with i-joists.SikaBit Pro 940® combines the advantages of APAO and SBS-modified bitumen, allowing two different compounds to work together. The upper layer comprises APA-modified bitumen, offering excellent heat resistance and durability. The under layer is SBS-modified bitumen, providing increased elongation, improving flexibility and excellent resistance to thermo-oxidative aging which will last longer than traditional membranes and reduce ongoing maintenance. SikaBit® has been developed to comply with the NFRC’s Safe2Torch Guidance to help specifiers prioritise safety at the design stage of roofing projects. The specification of SikaBit Pro 940® as part of the school’s energy-efficient roofing system contributed to the building’s fabric achieving required levels of thermal, airtightness, acoustic and maintenance performance. In terms of the roof’s construction, Innovaré manufactured large-format structural timber roof cassettes, ensuring that the structural members and deck went into place quickly. RLW Roofing, one of Sika’s Certified Roofing Contractors, were responsible for the design and installation of the roofing system. In addition, RLW Roofing completed façade works, using Sika Parex Historic Mortar KL. “We are proud that in collaboration with RLW Roofing, our products and expertise were used to successful effect in the delivery of this wonderful school, RLW’s skill and expertise were instrumental in delivering a technically robust solution” Simon Griffiths Head of Sales, Offsite Construction at Sika, said. “The hybrid method of construction implemented by Innovaré for this project aligns perfectly with Sika’s promotion of sustainable development within the construction industry.” Now fully opened, the King Edward VI Northfield School for Girls will begin its purpose to serve as a catalyst to transform opportunities, build aspiration and further develop academic success for its 750 students. It’s a huge ambition that Sika is delighted to help fulfil.

Read More »

SUCCESS FOR WOODHEAD GROUP AS EEM ANNOUNCES NEW PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT FRAMEWORK WINNERS

Robert Woodhead Ltd, part of the Woodhead Group, has capped an impressive start to the year by winning a place on the new Efficiency East Midlands (EEM) Property Improvement Works framework for the next four years.  The framework, which covers both investment and refurbishment schemes, allows the Nottinghamshire-based company to tender for projects from public sector organisations across the East Midlands.  The award is a continuation of the contractor’s long-standing relationship with EEM, having been part of its housebuilding frameworks for the previous eight years. During this time, the company has delivered or is on site with more than £50m of projects and completed its 500th new home secured through the framework in 2019.   Previous work procured through EEM include the long-standing B@Home partnership with Bolsover District Council, delivering 107 new homes as well as housing projects for Newark and Sherwood District Council, North West Leicestershire Council and Bassetlaw District Council.  Leo Woodhead, business development director at Woodhead Group said: “The framework will give our public sector partners easier access to Woodhead Group for a wider scope of work, this will expand our offer from the existing new build housing framework to include improvement and refurbishment works across the public sector corporate and commercial property portfolio. “We have delivered excellent social value returns across our EEM projects and as a company we are passionate about working collaboratively to hand over successful projects.”  EEM is a not-for-profit procurement consortium that delivers simple and comprehensive procurement solutions, which offer a wide range of compliant, competitive and high-quality products and services.  Rebecca Dermody-Simmons, Deputy Chief Executive at EEM said “Our new, re-vamped Property Improvement Framework will help our Members deliver a much wider scope of projects and we are delighted that Woodhead has gained a place on the newly introduced Corporate and Commercial Property lot. We look forward to continuing our successful relationship over the next four years.” For more information about Woodhead Group, please visit woodhead-group.co.uk or join the conversation @WoodheadGroup.

Read More »

Detecting Sagging Roofs Early

Have you ever noticed a house whose roof looks curved and drooping instead of straight and wondered what is happening? This is a sagging roof. It can range from a simple problem to a more complicated one where you need a professional. This can be worrying. A little sag does not mean there is an imminent danger of its collapse. It is however a sign telling you to take some necessary actions. How Do You Know You Have a Sagging Roof? You will need to inspect it to know. You can check out a few ways to find out here. You can inspect it both from outside and inside. To inspect from inside the house, you need to get into the attic. Be sure you have a source of light bright enough to see every part. The roof should have a shape of a triangle combining the rafters and the beam that holds them. If you notice an unevenness when it is not designed that way, then you have a sagging roof. To inspect from outside, check from the side of the house and not from the end. See where the ridge of the roof is and measure with a straight plank or maybe a ruler. If it varies in contour from the straightedge, you most likely have a problem. If it is sagging, it can be repaired and reinforced. So, the earlier you detect it and take steps to correct it before it deteriorates into a bigger one, the better for you. Causes of Sagging Several individual factors may be responsible for sagging. It could also be a collection of these different individual factors. This website https://homereference.net/sagging-roof/ aims to explain these factors in detail. They include: Water Although Roofs are designed for optimal drainage, if the gutter system is flawed or a damaged shingle or any other thing impedes the flow of water from it, rainwater and snow can gather on it. Over time, due to poor ventilation in the attic, trapped moisture creates an environment for mold and mildew to grow which weakens it and causes it to deteriorate and sag. If this is the case, the first step will be to address the problem that eventually led to the sagging. Too Much Weight A roof is designed to handle a specific weight. Excess weight from ice and snow can cause it to sag. If you suspect this, call a professional to clear the ice. Also, structural problems and design issues like insufficient sheaths, undersized or inadequate number of rafters may not provide the needed support for the weight it is carrying. Excess layers of shingles and materials might also lead to too much weight. Inadequate Rafters and Joints Improperly constructed rafters or joints can lead to this. The weight of the roof pushes down on the ridge line then it is distributed to the rafters, joints and walls.  A poorly constructed one will over time become structurally inadequate. Age An average roof lasts between 15 to about 30 years when properly maintained and based on the climate and weather of where you live. They start to deteriorate when they reach the end of their lifespan. Other Causes These may include poor quality of materials and faulty installation. This is a good reason to get good contractors to handle the installation process. Also, a sinking foundation can cause a house to sag and ultimately affect the roof. What to do Find out if your roof is sagging by carrying out a personal assessment of it. Contact a professional to assess it if it’s beyond you. Check your home insurance coverage to see if a roof repair or replacement is covered. If it is covered, get all the documents needed to file a claim for a repair or replacement. File a claim with the insurance company. Have a professional fix it as it as soon as possible. Conclusion If you notice or suspect any issue, it is wise to take steps to fix it immediately. This is so as not to make it worse and by implication, more expensive to fix. If left unrepaired, it could eventually cave in and can cause more damage to your house. It could also cause injury or death to someone. Don’t forget that there could be one or more combined reasons why it is sagging. Let the professional assess and check all possible scenarios so you are sure that the root cause is discovered and fixed.

Read More »

Fall protection cost-cutting: a step too far?

Any work at height carries risk. Preventing accidents from falls relies on all stakeholders using an informed, joined-up approach to practices and systems. Specifiers, contractors, system installers and end-users all play a part in risk mitigation. James Sainsbury, Fall Protection Sales leader for MSA Safety, explains why a holistic approach to safety is needed, and highlights the potential risks of making ill-informed changes to a defined safety system specification. Gravity is a an ever-present force. It doesn’t offer second chances. And however diligent safety planning and preparations may be, a fall is always a possibility. With workers’ lives at stake, there’s simply no excuse for inadequate fall protection systems and personal safety equipment. Accident prevention: the UK picture Despite the fact that almost all falls from height can be prevented, it’s a sobering reminder that they still remain the leading cause of workplace fatalities. The most recent Health and Safety Executive (HSE) statistics show that in 2017 alone, falls accounted for 28% of all UK fatalities in the workplace. Digging deeper, between 2013/14 and 2017/18, falls from a height accounted for more than a quarter of all fatal injuries to workers. That’s an average of 37 deaths a year. In addition, a staggering 43,000 non-fatal accidents involved falls from height too. Over 60% of deaths when working at height involve falls from ladders, scaffolds, working platforms and roof edges and through fragile roofs. It’s no wonder that HSE research has also revealed 19% of people think their health and safety is at risk at work (2010). Whilst the UK, like much of Europe, is a mature market, with comprehensive regulatory standards for safety systems and practices, there is still much room for improvement. Setting realistic safety system budgets, honouring specifications, understanding the suitability and quality of different equipment, accurately assessing risk and training users to be competent are all on the agenda. Creating the plan: specifiers As the first link in the chain of creating safer working at height, the value of consulting specifier professionals cannot be overstated. The decisions, assessments and recommendations they provide result in the most appropriate fall protection system specification for the building at the outset: one that will maximise protection for users and allow work at height to be carried out more safely and efficiently. A system specification can be defined by architects, consultants or engineers, or by safety system industry professionals, such as professional installers. A thorough specification takes account of both the unique risks posed by the structure and the practical access requirements needed for safe works. It will also mean full compliance with all local and national health and safety and regulatory conditions. Manufacturers, too, can provide consultation and system design, helping to make sure that the very best equipment and system is installed. Controlling the project: contractors One of the most important elements of the specification – at least for contractors – is the independently-calculated budget allowance required to procure and install the recommended system. Unfortunately, specification-switching down-the-line by UK contractors seeking to reduce costs can be problematic. This worrying trend has the potential to put workers’ lives at risk. Simply changing or substituting elements for alternatives that are perceived as less costly can be short sighted and dangerous. Any specified system for working at height, and any attendant cost, is usually proposed for sound safety reasons. High-quality equipment benefits from advanced engineering and rigorous testing, both of which contribute to full compliance and reliable performance. Lesser products may wear, degrade or fail more quickly, requiring premature replacement and increasing Total Cost of Ownership. When equipment is well designed and easy to use, the risks of equipment failure are naturally lower. Putting it all in place: Installers The performance and safety of fall protection equipment depends on correct installation, testing and commissioning. Quality installers have a responsibility to check that only technically-competent professionals install equipment. Leading companies are fully familiar with the leading manufacturer systems, are usually accredited, and will have undergone specialist training to be certain systems are installed exactly in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines, including all compliance checks at sign-off. Once equipment is installed, the installer will be responsible for commissioning, testing and ongoing maintenance and, in some cases, arranging user training. Experienced installers are also used to quickly overcoming any unexpected challenges a building may pose – for example, undertaking a retrofit system installation within an older or historic building. They will also spot and highlight any new risks or findings that may impact the effectiveness of the fall protection system. Confident and capable: end users There’s no value in provisioning fall protection equipment if workers are unable, or are unwilling, to use it properly. Whilst overseeing safety, risk assessments and method statements for those that work at height falls to the site manager and/or health and safety officer, all equipment users should be ‘competent persons’. That means expert PPE and or fall equipment system training from a qualified provider. Can users check equipment before use? Do they know when and how to use it correctly? Do they possess the expertise and confidence to make the right decisions at the right time? Can they execute an agreed rescue plan if needed? Safety and accountability: inextricably linked If UK working at height safety statistics are to improve, the sequential chain from specifier through to user requires close scrutiny. At every stage each party has a duty of care to respect the integrity of what should remain an optimal safety system. Specification-switching and making arbitrary changes to carefully chosen solutions may have serious implications. Equally, users deserve to feel confident using systems, and must be supported with quality training and rigorous equipment checks. Most falls from height are preventable. All parties engaged in fall protection should be aligned and accountable to keeping workers safe.

Read More »

Roofing Company in Detroit

There are many roofing companies in Detroit, but how do you know if you are getting a quality roofing company for a good price? There are a few key elements to understand and remember before hiring a roofing company in Detroit. This article will discuss the key elements and provide you with a few roofing companies in Detroit. No matter your company’s needs, you want a team of experts that will go the extra mile and provide you with quality roofing services. You will want to look for a roofing company able to handle any task, big or small, with the right equipment and at the right price.   One way to size up a roofing company in Detroit quickly and easily is to see how they answer the phone on your first encounter. Does someone answer the phone or do you get voicemail? If so, do they respond to you within a reasonable time? Do they try to pressure you into replacing the whole roof without knowing what you need? Do they give you reluctant or vague answers to your questions?   There are many different types of roofing services available on the market today. Whether you require roof repair, roof maintenance or roof installation, you want to find the best solution for your needs. You also want to be sure that your roofing company in Detroit offer customizable solutions. Let’s look at a few types of roofing types available in today’s market.   Metal Roofing Metal roofs provide beauty, energy savings and protection for your company’s building that can last a lifetime. Metal roofs are available in a wide variety of designs that will complement any style of building. Depending on your needs, you may want to look into hiring a roofing company in Detroit that specializes in metal roofing.   Slate Roofing Slate is one of the most visually pleasing and durable of all roofing materials. Installed properly, slate roofs require relatively little maintenance and will last for more than 100 years depending on the type of slate employed, roof configuration and the geographical location of the property. Depending on your needs, you may want to look into hiring a roofing company in Detroit that specializes in slate roofing.   Green Roofing Green roofing alleviates water runoff and sewer overflows. The vegetation and soil act as a sponge, absorbing and filtering water that would normally be lost to gutters. A green roof’s plants remove air particulates, produce oxygen and provide shade. Depending on your needs, you may want to look into hiring a roofing company in Detroit that specializes in green roofing.   Cornices The purpose of a cornice is primarily decorative; however, cornices serve a waterproofing function by shielding the top of the building’s façade from rain runoff. Depending on your needs, you may want to look into hiring a roofing company in Detroit that specializes in cornices.   Cupolas, Domes and Turrets A turret is a small tower that extends above a structure, characteristically at a corner location. A dome is an architectural element that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. Architecturally, cupolas are somewhat small, most often dome-like, and they provide a vantage point or admit air and light, often topped with a weathervane. These types of architectural structures are decorative but still endure all weather conditions and are therefore susceptible to deterioration. Make sure you pick a roofing company in Detroit that has replaced or refurbished cupolas, domes and turrets on a consistent basis.   Any roofing project, big or small, should start with an analysis of the problem. The analysis is a scientific process of elimination of the possibilities, starting with the most obvious. You will want to find a company that will look at the walls, the plumbing and the mechanical equipment, as well as the roofing. You will also want to make sure your roofing company in Detroit is fully licensed and insured.

Read More »

Sika Strengthens Team with Appointment

Sika-Trocal, part of the Sika Group, has appointed a new Area Technical Manager, strengthening its Midlands team by doing so. Donna Owen joins the company from Building Innovation where she held the position as Key Account Management for roofing and tapered insulation. Sika-Trocal provides flat roofing membranes that are suitable for a wide range of applications including new build, refurbishment, solar and green roof specifications. “This is an extremely exciting opportunity for me. Sika-Trocal is a leading light in the roofing industry and renowned as an innovator of high-quality solutions. I hope my experience will prove beneficial and further the company’s superb service offering,” said Donna. She will lean on over 20 years’ construction-based sales and development experience in the new role, working with Area Technical Managers and the applications team. “The chance to work for such a high-profile employer as Sika proved too great to resist. It offers a huge, but very rewarding challenge. I’m looking forward to meeting my new colleagues and taking this next valuable step in my career. I’m particularly excited about being involved with the Bombardier and Rock Roofing projects and hope to hit the ground running,” Donna said. “Forging excellent account relationships and possessing good industry knowledge are traits I like to think have helped me progress in my chosen field. It sounds old-fashioned, but I truly believe success is built on hard work and a willingness to learn,” she added.

Read More »

ROGUE ROOFERS IDENTIFIED AS BLIGHT ON ‘UNDER-APPRECIATED’ TRADE

A nationwide research survey of roofers revealed that ‘weeding out’ rogue roofers is the most pressing issue for those working in the roofing trade. Almost three quarters (72 percent) of all respondents, in a survey conducted by Chandlers Roofing Supplies say that work by unscrupulous roofers was the top issue facing the future of the roofing trade. A staggering 73 percent of roofers said they had been called upon to rectify ‘shoddy’ roofing work by a rogue roofer on at least one occasion in the last 12 months. The aging profile of the roofing trade was the second most pressing issue for the roofing trade with almost two thirds (58%) of respondents saying that the aging workforce was a critical issue for the trade. In addition, 95% of UK roofers feel they are the least appreciated among all trades people. According to a third of respondents, electricians attract the most appreciation from customers, followed by carpenters or chippys and in third place plumbers.  Brickies and roofers were identified as the least appreciated trades. This is despite the fact that almost half (46%) of roofers report working a seven-day week at least once a month, with 20% working a seven-day week ‘more often than not.’ 70% of roofers rating their physical health as ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, yet one fifth report being off work in the last two years due to an injury sustained on the job. Mental health also appears to be growing issue for roofers with 18% saying that they, or a work mate, had suffered from a mental health issue over the past 12 months. Notwithstanding the feelings of being ‘ambushed’ by rogue roofers and generally under-appreciated by customers, half of all roofers say they ‘always enjoy’ their job, 48% say they ‘sometimes enjoy’ their trade with only 2 percent saying they don’t enjoy being a roofer. 44% of roofers would even recommend roofing as a career to a friend or family member. When questioned about their earnings, almost half (47%) said they ‘are comfortable’, 22% say they are ‘doing well’ and a quarter say they ‘get by’. Sue McKinney, of Chandlers Roofing Supplies said: “Its not surprising that customers are somewhat unappreciative when subjected to the services of rogue roofers. Nevertheless, it needs to be highlighted that the vast majority of roofers work exceptionally hard and to a very high standard completing excellent projects for customers.” Asked how they became roofers, 35% of respondents said they ‘fell into’ the trade while in excess of a quarter reporting that the roofing trade has been in the family. Only 1 in 10 had been down the roofing apprenticeship route. Working at a height is reported as the biggest occupational risk according to 53% of roofers followed by 37 per cent saying that inclement weather is a high risk.  However, the development of new materials and tools was identified by half of respondents as the key factor that has made the roofer’s job easier and safer. A further quarter of respondents say that training in health and safety has benefited the trade. Sue McKinney of Chandlers Roofing Supplies, said: “It is very clear that roofers work hard, putting in a seven day week on a regular basis and in often challenging conditions, so we do need to show them some appreciation. We want to hear about fantastic roofing projects and wonderful roofers. You can share your stories of appreciation on Facebook @ChandlersbuildingSupplies.” Chandlers Roofing Supplies is opening two new roofing stores shortly in Tonbridge and Harrow to add to its existing 12-store network. Www.chandlersbs.co.uk –       ROOFERS MOST UNDER APPRECIATED TRADE, WORK 7-DAY WEEKS YET STILL ENJOY THE JOB –       ELECTRICIANS MOST APPRECIATED TRADE –       7 OUT OF 10 ROOFERS HAVE HAD TO RECTIFY A ROGUE ROOFERS SHODDY JOB IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS ALONG

Read More »