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March 23, 2017

Don't fall foul of the water laws

Don’t fall foul of the water laws Published:  06 September, 2016 UK water companies and the WRAS water regulations body are urging plumbers and homeowners alike to make sure they know the ‘water laws’ before undertaking any plumbing work. In many cases, work on new and existing plumbing systems, as

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Better food waste capture 'good for local authorities'

10 June 2016 | Martin Read More needs to be done to improve food recycling and food waste capture, according to the Renewable Energy Association (REA) and Local Authority Recycling Advisory Committee (LARAC). In a joint statement, the two organisations have expressed concerns following the release last month of

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Pressures driving businesses to opt for different workplace models

18 October 2016 | Herpreet Kaur Grewal Changing business priorities are driving corporations to consider different workplace models.   The latest report by CoreNet Global, in partnership with architecture firm’s HOK’s WorkPlace practice, studies the impact of co-working from a corporate real estate (CRE) perspective and examines the drivers of co-working

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What Sort of Survey Should I Have?

Unless you’re a building professional and can give a property a thorough inspection yourself then it’s vital to get your potential house looked at before you buy it. If you are getting a mortgage, the provider will carry out a property valuation to ensure that the house or apartment is

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BDC 319 : Aug 2024

March 23, 2017

Don't fall foul of the water laws

Don’t fall foul of the water laws Published:  06 September, 2016 UK water companies and the WRAS water regulations body are urging plumbers and homeowners alike to make sure they know the ‘water laws’ before undertaking any plumbing work. In many cases, work on new and existing plumbing systems, as well as some types of water installation, must be notified to, and approved by, the local water supplier before it can begin. This is to make sure the work meets the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations, which are designed to keep drinking water supplies safe and healthy. The regulations apply to many types of domestic and commercial plumbing – from building new houses or extending business premises, to everyday work such as installing certain types of bidets or large baths. Julie Spinks, managing director of the Water Regulations Advisory Scheme (WRAS), explained: “The UK enjoys high-quality, safe drinking water and we want to make sure it stays that way. “Unfortunately, very few people are aware of their legal responsibilities to ensure certain types of plumbing work comply with these important regulations. “Getting permission is quick and free, but failure to notify your local water supplier could result in extra costs to put poor plumbing right or, worse, contamination of water supplies and a court prosecution. “Our message to homeowners is simple – if you are planning some plumbing installation work, take a few minutes to seek professional advice from your local water supplier, WRAS, or from a WaterSafe approved plumber who is familiar with the regulations.” The notification and consent process takes up to 10 days and is free of charge. In many cases, the water supplier will simply need a description of the planned work and the contact details of those undertaking it. Types of plumbing work that must be notified to water suppliers include: Building a house or other property/structure Extending or altering the water system on a non-household building Changing the use of a building or installing water systems, such as rainwater harvesting Installing a swimming pool or pond over 10,000 litres A garden watering system (unless operated by hand) A bath which holds more than 230 litres of water A bidet with an upward spray or flexible hose A pump or booster that delivers water at a rate of more than 12 litres/min A reverse osmosis unit (for cleaning water) A water treatment unit that produces waste water A reduced pressure zone valve assembly or similar Any water system outside a building that is either less than 750mm (0.75 metres) or more than 1,350mm (1.35 metres) below ground. This list is not exhaustive and extra requirements are in place in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Approved plumbers – those already trained to meet the strict regulations for installing pipes and fittings which supply drinking water – are able to carry out some types of work without prior notification. WaterSafe is the central body for approved professional plumbers in the UK – approved plumbing businesses can be found using the postcode search at www.watersafe.org.uk. To find out more about the Water Fittings Regulations, visit www.wras.co.uk/notification.   Source link

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Better food waste capture 'good for local authorities'

10 June 2016 | Martin Read More needs to be done to improve food recycling and food waste capture, according to the Renewable Energy Association (REA) and Local Authority Recycling Advisory Committee (LARAC). In a joint statement, the two organisations have expressed concerns following the release last month of an REA report entitled ‘The Real Economic Benefit of Separate Food Waste Collections’. In the report, the REA concluded that food waste collected separately can, in a majority of cases, save money for local authorities and businesses in the UK. This is because: Separate food and other biowaste collections require fewer general waste collections (once the putrescible material has been removed on a weekly basis);  Separately collected food and other biowaste significantly reduces the weight of general waste collections, in turn reducing the cost of disposing of general wastes in landfill;  Gate fees for separately collected food waste are significantly lower at anaerobic digestion or composting facilities compared to landfill sites.   Jeremy Jacobs, technical Director at the REA, said: “Increasing the volume of food waste that is collected separately is critical to meet our legally binding recycling target of 50 per cent by 2020. There is an urgent need for new policy; collaboration and consensus are the strongest tools we have available to achieve it.” Jacobs believes the renewables industry is sensitive to the tight budgetary constraints that most local authorities face: “We are open to working with them to deliver workable solutions and innovative funding models”. Concerns about UK-wide separate food waste collections have focused on the need for more collaboration between industry and local authorities. LARAC chair Andrew Bird said: “Local authorities are under extraordinary pressure at the moment and for the foreseeable future, and each faces their own difficult budgetary choices. We know that the REA understands this, and we see the point of their report – that there are potential savings to be made with separate food waste treatment compared to residual waste disposal, and this can help offset additional collection costs.” Source link

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Pressures driving businesses to opt for different workplace models

18 October 2016 | Herpreet Kaur Grewal Changing business priorities are driving corporations to consider different workplace models.   The latest report by CoreNet Global, in partnership with architecture firm’s HOK’s WorkPlace practice, studies the impact of co-working from a corporate real estate (CRE) perspective and examines the drivers of co-working from the demand and supply side, the industry risks and implications for corporate real estate, as well as information about the owners, coworkers and centres.   It says that businesses’ need to attract talented people, reduce real estate costs, improve speed to innovation and increase productivity are driving corporations to consider different workplace models, including on- and off-site co-working.   Kay Sargent, director of Workplace at HOK, said: “Although co-working space makes up less than 1 per cent of the world’s office space, it represents an important workforce trend and highlights the strong desire of today’s employees to have workplace choices, community and flexibility.”   She said: “Driven by demand factors, including new-generation work styles and the desire for real estate portfolio agility, C-suite executives from human resources, operations, real estate and finance are increasingly interested in how co-working affects their work practices and policies—and how they need to design, manage and operate their workplaces.”   Key findings from the co-working report also include: • The co-working concept is evolving to comprise accelerators, incubators and maker spaces. It reaches beyond office settings to include college campuses, retail locations, hotels and libraries.  • The impact of co-working spaces on CRE includes providing new uses for older properties and for underused spaces in existing facilities.  • The lowest engagement levels are found in employees who never work remotely. The highest employee engagement levels occur among those who work remotely less than 20 per cent of the time. • Many co-working centres emerged in a time of high unemployment and low rents. But 54 per cent of the coworkers will leave a specific location in less than a year.  • The high turnover and tenant instability challenge co-working centres to maintain profitability. They are vulnerable to market conditions and new competitors. Source link

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'Without amazing construction people, the country would grind to a halt'

Ahead of the Summit, CN asked Ms Wilkins for her views on how to attract people to the construction industry. What should companies be doing to support people entering or returning to work in the industry? For me this is about forming great networks and connecting with the next generations. Looking at mums returning to work, it can be daunting to come back into such a fast-paced environment. If we can help by bringing them into established networks with people who have had similar experiences, we can give real-life examples of where people have returned successfully. I’ve found that girls still believe there are no jobs for them in construction, so visiting schools and showing them what roles I’ve done and talking about other great women in the industry really helps. Construction has roles for everybody, be that out on site as a signalling engineer or in the office as part of the finance team. How do you see the digitalisation of construction changing roles and the skills required? Digitalisation in construction will certainly provide a step-change in the roles available and the skills needed to have a successful career. It will help to change the perception of so-called ‘dirty’ sites, which isn’t always attractive to new people in industry. It will help bring in new perspectives and attitudes, supporting better work-life mix and the balance of roles in and out of the office. What should government, companies and individuals be doing to attract the next generation to the industry? Collaborate, communicate and celebrate! We need to move away from competing as individuals and look to work together. Communication is crucial; young people are still in the dark on the opportunity construction brings. And we should celebrate more; without all the amazing people who choose to work in this sector, the country would grind to a halt. Which is your favourite project you have been involved with? It’s not really a specific project, but in my current role I look to support the business in terms of innovation. Last year I went on a tour that gave me the chance to get on site every day. It was one of the best weeks I have had, meeting our diverse workforce at every level. What will you be speaking about at this year’s Summit? I’ll be presenting on supporting the next generation of ladies into construction as well as how Carillion is focused on supporting women. When I started at 17, I was one of the few ladies on any of the depots or sites I worked on. This is improving, but not quickly enough. CN Summit – career champions Hear from Joanne Wilkins, a career champion, on Day 2 at 14.10 on the Future-gazing stage. She will speak alongside Interserve senior consultant Arran Linton-Smith and Anisa Hussein, associate director – project management, JLL. To book your place at the CN Summit, click here or call Ilja Ryndin on 020 3033 2609 or by email at Ilja.Ryndin@emap.com.          Source link

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Former Barn and Cart Shed Located in Dumfriesshire has Been Put up for an RICS Scotland Award

A former barn and cart shed located in Dumfriesshire has been shortlisted for an RICS Scotland Award. Hazelwood, the property belonging to Lily Jencks has been shortlisted for the Design Through Innovation category. The RICS Scotland Award ceremony takes place on Wednesday the 26th April at the Sheraton Grand Hotel & Spa in Edinburgh. During this award ceremony, the winners of each category and the winner of the Project of the Year Award will be revealed. The host of this even will be Catriona Shearer, the BBC Broadcaster. In order to create Hazelwood, Savills were elected as the project’s executive architects. Savills worked alongside the property owner Lily Jencks and Nathanael Dorent, the French architect. This collaboration led to the construction of a rural yet modern family retreat. The barn and cart shed were previously derelicts and sat in ruins before the project began. Hazelwood has been designed in order to make the most of the scenery, as the site has panoramic country views. The final building is a mix of traditional and contemporary structures that combine, resulting in a shortlist for the Design Through Innovation RICS Scotland Award. The project needed an innovative design solution when combining the traditional structure and the contemporary design. To deal with this, a modern building into the original ruined structure. This development was completed through the use of simple timber and a steel external shell that is clad in plywood, and covered in an EPDM membrane. This build was carried out and has led to a seemingly seamless combination of the original structure and contemporary additions to create a beautiful property. The interior of the property includes a curving internal tube structure made of plywood and polystyrene covering in fiberglass. This structure lends a cave-like feel to the property and contrasts with the simpler lines of the external structure.

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ISG Has Been Named as the Number One Central London Corporate Office Interior Fit Out Contractor

The worldwide construction services company ISG has been named as the number one central London corporate office interior fit out contractor. The construction services company has been given this award for the fifth consecutive year. The report conducted by Metropolis Property Research ranks firms that are involved in ‘Cat B’ projects. There projects involve new space taken by corporate occupiers and covers from 2012 to 2016. This report suggests that ISG has had a dominant share in the ‘Cat B’ office fit outs in London since 2012. The office fit outs count for 33% of business given to the top ten firms. This equates to over 5 million sq. ft. of space. ISG has carried out works for a variety of different clients. The schemes include work for global financial services firms as well as the 700,000 sq. ft. fit out of 5 Broadgate. ISG were part of this project that has been labelled as the biggest office project to take place in central London for the past five years. The company also worked on CMS’ 160,000 sq. ft. headquarters which is located at Cannon Place. ISG has also been involved in the 100,00 sq. ft. scheme in Midtown for Saatchi & Saatchi. The new award is also representative of the continuing high standard of customer service from ISG. The sector has experienced a significant deal of change over the last five years, and ISG has had to adapt to the advances in technology as well as the new products and methods for construction. The construction service has remained popular in a market where it is an advantage to offer more for less. ISG aim to offer the leading technological solutions when working. 57.3 million square feet of office space has been let over the five years that the report was being conducted, and 30.3 million square feet being Cat B projects.

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What Sort of Survey Should I Have?

Unless you’re a building professional and can give a property a thorough inspection yourself then it’s vital to get your potential house looked at before you buy it. If you are getting a mortgage, the provider will carry out a property valuation to ensure that the house or apartment is worth its market value, and that it can therefore lend with confidence. However, a mortgage valuation does not go deeply into the structure, or the nitty-gritty detail that could end up costing you a fortune in the long run if a defect is not identified. You may decide you want a more in-depth survey and assessing all options is advisable. The mortgage survey costs around £250-350 and is usually included in your fees. The documentation will be under the legal ownership of the lender so should the valuer fail to spot a costly defect then you will have no claim against them. For an extra £100 or so you can pay for a Homebuyer Survey and Valuation, which comes under the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), so will be a standard report on the condition of the property. Despite the complex RICS language the Homebuyer Survey and Valuation will help you recognise any potential structural problems that could knock value off the property. You will also be given a new valuation that could lower your mortgage. If structural problems are found and you work out it’s going to cost say £3,000 to repair, then you should be able to get this taken off the asking price, thereby lowering your mortgage. Next on the list is a Home Condition Survey, which is similar in price and detail to the RICS Homebuyer Survey and Valuation but will give you a bit more advice on how to deal with some of the more common problems that have been found at the property. Finally, recommended for both new and old properties is the full Building Survey, which can cost anything from £600 to £1,000. This is a comprehensive survey – in fact the most comprehensive available – and could be well worth the extra money, especially if you’re considering purchasing an older property. It won’t actually go as far having a surveyor pulling up floorboards to look at what lies beneath but the surveyor will give an opinion on possible hidden defects. Newer houses will still need a survey – even new builds don’t come with a guarantee of perfect quality and last year saw MPs call for a New Homes Ombudsman in the face of concerns over construction defects. At least new homes come with the 10-year warranty issued by the National House Building Council though; the Financial Times reported that the NHBC ended up paying out £87 million on claims by homeowners in 2015 alone.

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Actavo Building Solutions is the Fastest Growing Modular Building Company in the UK

According to Plimsoll Analysis, Actavo Building solutions is the fastest growing modular building company in the UK. They have also now been awarded a place on the NHS construction framework. The company has been awarded several lots as a part of the new four-year modular building framework for the NHS. This work is set to be valued at £750 million. The NHS is struggling currently, with the availability of beds on the NHS being at an all-time low it is essential that there is a great deal of investment in order to increase the facilities available in a time frame which is incredibly narrow. To solve this, the NHS has come up with a framework that will focus purely on the supply of modular buildings. It is hoped that this work will allow faster, cheaper and greener production of space that will also help out the demand on the NHS. This NHS framework has been split into 11 separate lots. Actavo is one of many successful contractors, and will also fulfil the role of principle contractor in order to provide a variety of different services including full architectural design for the initial concept, as well as site works, and the completion of bespoke modular buildings to be used as health care units or education units. The speed and efficiency of modular buildings means there could be a massive project delivered in weeks rather than months. This is ideal considering the pressure the NHS is under to source more space. Over the course of the next four years, this new project should reduce the pressure for beds as well as reduce the need for short-term hire options which could save money. These buildings are not just being built for the quick fix, they can be constructed over a short space of time however the buildings should be able to last in the long term.

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