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August 5, 2019

What is Hot Riveting and How is it used?

There has been a steady rise in the use of plastic materials in several production processes. Industries are continually trying to develop new materials that are cost and energy-efficient. As a result, the mixed materials assembly in product development is becoming increasingly popular. Companies are looking for ways to join

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University Of Leicester Prepares for Major Project

Contracts worth over £200 million have been handed out as the University of Leicester prepares to move forward with a major construction project. ENGIE and special purpose vehicle, Freemans Common Village LLP, will deliver the contracts which will see 1,164 new student homes built across seven blocks as well as

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Office Building in Exeter Sold for £9.36M

An office building in Exeter City Centre, which had as tenants Foot Anstey and wealth management firm Prydis, has been sold for £9.36 million. The 33,362 sq ft Senate Court office building has been sold by Prydis returning £2 million to investors in the process. “Exeter is a fast-growing city

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BDC 317 : Jun 2024

August 5, 2019

What is Hot Riveting and How is it used?

There has been a steady rise in the use of plastic materials in several production processes. Industries are continually trying to develop new materials that are cost and energy-efficient. As a result, the mixed materials assembly in product development is becoming increasingly popular. Companies are looking for ways to join different materials to develop products that feature enhanced durability and sustainable functionality. Plastic and metal are two of the most common materials that have to be joined. Hot riveting is one of the most effective ways of joining materials. And it is being used extensively by many companies. What is Hot Riveting? Before discussing hot riveting, we must know the basics of riveting. It involves the insertion of rivets into pre-drilled holes. The rivet head stays in place on one end of the hole as its diameter is more than the shaft. Upsetting or hammering is used to increase the width of the rivet tail, so it locks in place on the other end of the hole, creating a permanent joint. Hot Riveting is a process that joins two materials permanently at specific points using a form-closing technique. Thermoplastic must be one of the materials being joined, as it melts under heat and you can shape it with tools. Various types of heat application can be implemented in a hot riveting process, such as convection, conduction, friction, and radiation. Of these, convection and conduction are preferable as they will not produce any contaminating dust or swarf. Companies are resorting to different hot riveting technologies, ranging from manual to fully automatic. We recommend that you check out hot riveting by bdtronic, as they have one of the most environment-friendly and cost-effective processes. Other common names for hot riveting include hot forming and heat staking. Uses of Hot Riveting? Now that you have a decent understanding of what hot riveting is let’s take a look at its most prominent uses. It is mostly used where high strength and low weight are critical. The medical technology and automobile industries use it on a large-scale. It is also used in electronics production. Hot riveting can also be used in aircraft and window furniture. It is used for joining a wide range of materials, especially in vehicles. It has multiple uses in an automobile – the engine, door/window locking system, headlights, taillights, and control units. Any screwless joint you see can be achieved through hot riveting, as long as one of the materials to be joined is thermoplastic. Another common application of hot riveting is the permanent mounting of PCBs and other metals on houses. Final Words Welding and screwing materials together cannot be used everywhere. Hot riveting provides an effective way of creating permanent joints at low costs. It ensures consistent accuracy and top-notch quality. If you want to join two materials quickly and efficiently without spending a fortune, hot riveting is the perfect option.

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University Of Leicester Prepares for Major Project

Contracts worth over £200 million have been handed out as the University of Leicester prepares to move forward with a major construction project. ENGIE and special purpose vehicle, Freemans Common Village LLP, will deliver the contracts which will see 1,164 new student homes built across seven blocks as well as the construction of a new multi-storey car park and Teaching & Learning Centre.  The leading energy and services firm will oversee the projects before committing to a 50-year hard facilities management contract to provide technical services, estates management and external cleaning for the new residences, as well as enabling high speed Wi-Fi and IT services to ensure the best experience for occupants. The company will also deliver lifecycle management to the residences, which incorporates infrastructure replacement right through to internal components. Planned for the Freemans Commons site, the project will incorporate a number of renewable and energy-saving technologies including solar panels, highly efficient centralised gas fired Combined Heat and Power (CHP) and LED lighting will be installed. Martin Smithurst, Divisional Chief Operating Officer for ENGIE’s Places & Communities Division (North), said: “This is a prime project for ENGIE, as it’s one of the few occasions where we get to showcase our broad capabilities in placemaking. These contracts not only allow us to demonstrate our expertise across energy, services and regeneration; but provides us with the opportunity to apply our long-term investment model, by taking an equity stake in the scheme. This assures our partners and students of our long-term commitment to Leicester and its university. “We have delivered several similar higher education projects across the country and we’re delighted to be working with the University of Leicester, as well as Equitix, on such a remarkable scheme that will create a lasting legacy in Leicester.” Jake Fellows, Major Projects Director and project lead at ENGIE, added: “Working collaboratively with the University, Equitix and the wider stakeholder group, including funders and the City Council, we have been able to effectively design and mobilise this extremely exciting project. This development will deliver a significant regeneration of the Freemens Common site, providing market-leading accommodation for the University to support their recruitment strategy, as well as demonstrating the capability and experience of our team and supply chain to respond to complex projects of this nature.” Construction work will commence in September, with completion expected in three years. 

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Office Building in Exeter Sold for £9.36M

An office building in Exeter City Centre, which had as tenants Foot Anstey and wealth management firm Prydis, has been sold for £9.36 million. The 33,362 sq ft Senate Court office building has been sold by Prydis returning £2 million to investors in the process. “Exeter is a fast-growing city with a strong university, which continues to attract more and more new residents and businesses to the area. This transaction is brilliant news for our investors and for the local economy, delivering a win-win deal for all parties,” said Joe Priday, managing director at Prydis. Advising on the sale was commercial property agent, Lambert Smith Hampton (LSH). Prydis originally bought the building in April 2017 as an investment for members of its Precedence Club with planning permission secured to add an additional floor and, with advice from LSH, asset managed the leasehold interests to increase the capital value. “This asset is now in a fantastic position for the new owner and presents a strong and reliable income generator for them,” added James Priday, managing director at Prydis Wealth. “We congratulate them on what is a wonderful portfolio purchase. For us, this simply presented the best time to exit, as we had always envisaged this as a three-year project. We are now in the fortunate position of having achieved a 26 per cent return on our Precedence Club investors’ original investment in just 26 months; exactly what we’d forecast, but 10 months earlier than planned, so a great result all round.” Hollie Ruddle, associate director at LSH, said: “Despite continued uncertainty in the property market, we were approached by the purchaser prior to launching the investment in the open market. “This is testament to both the strength of the Exeter office market and the quality of the investment Prydis has managed during its ownership. “Prydis’ in-house approach to property enabled a smooth and timely transaction for its investors.”

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Can we have confidence in the print industry making sustainability a priority in 2019 an beyond?

It’s fair to point out that the print industry, one that many industries rely upon, has gathered up negative associations of being particularly destructive to the environment. This is chiefly due to deforestation and the various oils which contribute to the creation of ink. However, the outlook is positive… the print industry is forward thinking and making a conscious effort to become recognised as more economically sustainable. Browse our guide which explores a few of the companies making inroads to implement sustainability into their practices, to help shape their businesses into being more environmentally responsible. Action needs to be taken to reduce deforestation Forests cover approximately 30% of the world’s land area, however the rate at which they are being cut down is a serious cause for concern — 502,000 square miles getting the chop between 1990 and 2016. These trees are vital for absorbing carbon dioxide alongside a host of other dangerous greenhouse gases. Tree felling not only causes an increase in air pollution, but it also one of the primary causes of flooding. One study has pointed to the fact that 10% of deforestation has been carried out to cater for the supply of wood products — which includes paper. Recycled paper So, what’s being done in terms of reducing the amount of paper we use? In order to be classified as eco-friendly paper, the paper must have been created in a greener way than traditional paper would have been, therefore having a smaller carbon footprint. Recycled paper is beneficial because it doesn’t involve the use of fresh trees, it’s simply using the ones that have already been cut down. This process of reusing paper starts at home with your recycling bin. After the paper is collected it is taken to the recycling centre, where it is then shredded and pulped. Following this, the paper is rinsed thoroughly to remove any ink or glue-like substances. Reports have suggested that this process can be repeated a further six times before the usable life span of the paper reaches its climax. FSC paper Alternatively, as opposed to recycling paper, another option is available. The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an international not for profit organisation who certify the sourcing of paper to be sustainable. The group assess forest management agencies using 10 rules, which include the impact the deforestation has on both the workers, and those who live indigenously in the forest or the land around it. Unlike recycled paper, which does not return high quality prints and can often cause gritty imagery, FSC paper is undistinguishable from normal paper. This sustainable certification has led certain companies to opt for it as opposed to recycled paper. So far, FSC has certified 174 million hectares of forests worldwide. Ink Unfortunately for the printing industry, resolving the issue of the paper being environmentally unfriendly, is only half the battle. Initially, ink was made from plant-based sources, however by the 1970’s, everything had changed. Due to a particularly high demand, vegetable oils were no longer able to meet the needs of the country, and so manufacturers turned instead to petroleum-based products. These petroleum oil inks are otherwise known as Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Reports have suggested that offset printing uses more than three million tons of hydrocarbon-based inks and chemicals every year, releasing large quantities of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Less environmentally damaging technological methods need to be employed Companies have however, started to invest in alternative methods that are less damaging to the environment. These include vegetable based eco solvent inks, and waterless-based ink. Vegetable based inks consists of 51% sustainable materials, and unlike their petrol counterparts, which release high amounts of VOCs, vegetable-based inks only contribute between 2-15%. Similarly, thanks to technological innovation, significantly less water can be used in the production. In the past, vast amounts of water were used to make the ink and in the same sense, keep it dry, whereas now, waterless technology is helping the industry develop. Bio: Gary Peeling is MD at Where The Trade Buys, one such company who is placing an emphasis on becoming an industry leader within sustainable printing. The commercial print business has significantly invested in becoming an FSC partner, helping talking care of forests and the people who live in them. The company is a specialist in brochure printing, with bases in London, Sunderland and Surrey. Sources

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