BDC

Search

Scotland has scrapped major climate targets – so what’s next for net zero?

Scotland has scrapped major climate targets – so what’s next for net zero?

Following Climate Change Committee reports that the Scottish government’s ambition to reduce emissions by 75% by 2030 is out of reach, and the ensuing decision to scrap the target, Don McLean, CEO of Glasgow-headquartered climate tech company, IES, comments on the vital role that the built environment can play in driving progress towards net zero.

Don McLean, CEO of Glasgow-headquartered climate tech company, IES, commented:

“We’ve long known that the scale of the climate challenge is immense. However, it’s disappointing to see that Scotland has missed so many annual targets and its ambition to reduce carbon emissions by 75% by 2030 is now beyond reach – and officially scrapped.

“We’re already in a state of environmental emergency, and right now is simply not the time for our industry and society to backtrack on its commitments. Scotland’s 2045 net zero target remains in place, so we must now look ahead and further accelerate our efforts to decarbonise.

“We’ve already proven that progress can be made; between 1990-2021, Scottish greenhouse gas emissions have fallen by almost half (49.2%) compared to the baseline level in 1990. This issue isn’t about politics; it’s about our planet, and the private sector has a unique opportunity to acknowledge its responsibility and take the initiative to drive action.

“However, the biggest problem as I see it is that like most governments around the world, the Scottish government does not have the mechanisms in place to properly measure and make the reductions required to meet these ambitious targets. This is especially so in the built environment. Buildings are complex in the way they are designed, built and operated and in turn need sophisticated tools to navigate their decarbonisation. Without them governments face an impossible task.

Buildings are responsible for almost two-fifths (39%) of global energy-related carbon emissions, and governments, businesses and landlords must invest in their long-term decarbonisation plans to ensure that they opt for the most cost, energy, and carbon-efficient options for the future. By doing so, they can play a meaningful role in decarbonisation.”

Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Pinterest
WhatsApp
Email

Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024