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5 Reasons Your Building Needs a Planned Maintenance Schedule

Property maintenance can often seem like an exhausting and costly endeavour, with numerous aspects of a building to consider. By implementing a planned maintenance schedule for your building you can ensure that all elements of your premises are taken care of in a timely and cost effective manner. Here we

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Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

property maintenance

5 Reasons Your Building Needs a Planned Maintenance Schedule

Property maintenance can often seem like an exhausting and costly endeavour, with numerous aspects of a building to consider. By implementing a planned maintenance schedule for your building you can ensure that all elements of your premises are taken care of in a timely and cost effective manner. Here we explore the top 5 reasons to employ a planned maintenance schedule.   Compliance As a building owner or tenant there are numerous legislations and regulations which you must stay in compliance with to ensure a safe environment, and to stay within the law. From water safety checks, to electrical and fire equipment, each aspect must be carefully inspected and regularly maintained to confirm their compliance. A planned maintenance schedule ensures that your building undergoes necessary and regular compliance checks and receives appropriate maintenance as and when required.   Minimise Breakdowns Without regular maintenance checks smaller and more inconsequential issues can turn into larger, more unmanageable repairs, and even complete breakdowns. Checking equipment and the fabric of the building regularly for potential faults will help to detect any issues before they progress. A comprehensive maintenance schedule will ensure that the entire facility undergoes regular maintenance checks and breakdowns of equipment will be minimised.   Time Saving Whilst in the initial planning stages a planned maintenance schedule may seem time consuming, this process will help to save time in the long run. As equipment is checked on a regular schedule, the building or business owner can spend time more effectively elsewhere, without concerning themselves with the prospect of breakdowns or repairs. A blended strategy of reactive and planned maintenance would be suitable for most buildings to ensure there is regular maintenance occurring, along with having a qualified team on hand to respond quickly to a unexpected and reactive issues.   Cost Effective Waiting for breakdowns or maintenance issues to arise before fixing them may seem like a preferable option, with no need for outgoing cost of regular maintenance checks. However, this strategy can be a very costly way of maintaining a facility, and lead to longer downtime whilst larger repairs take place. A planned maintenance strategy will help to reduce costs as unexpected maintenance issues are spotted during the regular checks, and can be dealt with before escalating into larger more costly repairs or replacements. Without planned maintenance it can be easy to ignore potential maintenance issues which can have knock on effects further down the line.   Equipment Lifespan Replacing equipment within the fabric of a building can be expensive and time consuming, therefore being able to reduce the likelihood of replacements being necessary is highly preferable. Regularly checking equipment around the facility and repairing minor issues as and when they occur will help to maximise the life expectancy and value of the equipment, keeping it safe and efficient for longer. By employing a planned maintenance schedule and a qualified team to take care of the tasks in your facility, will help to ensure your building continues to function safely and within the law. Whilst having the appearance of being time consuming and costly, planned maintenance will inevitably help to prevent major issues and expenditures from occurring.

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Planning permission granted as Applied Engineering Design takes on role in regeneration of Eyemouth boat yard

One of Scotland’s most imaginative and innovative engineering design specialists has taken on a crucial role in the regeneration of Eyemouth boat yard, one of the last remaining repair facilities for the East Coast fishing fleet and the RNLI. Planning permission has just been granted for a state-of-the-art repair and maintenance facility at the Borders port as part of an ambitious £2 million investment. The designs and planning were prepared for the Edinburgh-based Applied Engineering Design (AED). The plans envisage the removal of existing sheds and their replacement with modern buildings which will accommodate bigger boats as well as facilitating year-round working. The vision for the project also encompasses slipways and offices, education and hospitality facilities. It is the latest high profile project for AED, which has also been commissioned for work on the multi-billion pound Battersea Power Station development in London – dubbed the toughest project in the world – while last year AED successfully took on the restoration of the iconic but troubled Ross Fountain in Edinburgh’s Princes Street Gardens. Tim Hetherington, Director of AED, said: “The connection of the Eyemouth boat yard with the sea is unshakeable and it is a key employer in the town, providing work for up to 20 people. Without it, boats would have to go to Arbroath or Whitby for out-of-water repairs. “The plans we prepared employ the latest civil and structural engineering techniques for work in the inter-tidal zone, the multiple sheds which will increase the range of boats the yard can handle and the educational facilities, including a viewing gallery. “When the transformation is complete Eyemouth boat yard will be embraced as a focal point in the community which will provide valuable training and apprenticeship opportunities as well as skilled jobs.” The yard was taken over last year by Patrick Flockhart, who intends to turn around its fortunes with investment in plant and people. Trading as Eyemouth Marine, it intends to become a “garage for the sea”, but also to serve “sea, wind and shore”, using marine skills to serve onshore industry as well as offshore wind arrays. It is anticipated that, with the necessary permissions, work will begin on the Eyemouth yard in the middle of 2019. AED was founded in 2008 and now has offices in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Bath. It has a turnover of £650,000 and employs 10 people. Unusually, AED still undertakes most detailed design and coordination work in house. The company serves individuals and businesses in sectors including industry and commerce, sport and education, infrastructure and property maintenance.

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