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Protecting an entire construction technology fleet

Construction technology is a large investment that businesses are usually willing to make to improve operations. However, the construction industry rarely invests in a warranty or service plan to protect new equipment. Here Lisa Cheshire, Inside Sales Specialist at SITECH® UK & Ireland, A Trimble Authorised Dealer, discusses how construction

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HOW DRONES ARE CHANGING CONSTRUCTION

The PwC’s membership network report, Skies without Limits, recently revealed that drone technology is expected to uplift the UK’s construction industry by £8.6 bn by 2030. This growth was largely attributed to innovation and improved productivity. As drone technology becomes more sophisticated, it can offer a range of benefits for

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WHAT DOES THE CONSTRUCTION SITE OF THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?

The construction site will be human-free by 2050. That’s what Balfour Beatty predicted in its Innovation 2050 report back in 2017. While 2050 is far in our future, technology is already changing how we work on construction sites. Here Carl Parsons, regional sales manager of heavy civil solutions at SITECH,

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New training academy for construction technology

SITECH UK & Ireland, the leading distributor of Trimble® machine control technology for the heavy and civil construction industry, has launched a new training Academy to support operators using construction technology. The Academy includes a selection of courses delivered through distance learning, practical demonstrations and face-to-face classrooms sessions. Sessions are

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IMPROVED PROGRESS TRACKING FOR EARTHMOVING

SITECH UK & Ireland, the leading distributor of Trimble® technology, now offers an innovative progress tracking software solution that uses drones to help site managers map, measure and manage their sites more effectively. Trimble® Stratus, powered by Propeller, is a data analytics and visualisation platform that is designed specifically for

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Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

sitech

SITECH® TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTS RAPID GROWTH FOR SOCIAL HOUSING PROVIDER

SITECH® TECHNOLOGY supports rapid growth for social housing provider

Social housing developer First Endeavour LLP has invested in a complete range of on and off machine technology from SITECH® UK & Ireland to optimise engineer time and site productivity as council projects flood in for the New Year. The Scottish business with offices in Aberdeen and Fife began discussions to fit their machines with SITECH Trimble technology six months ago after experiencing a shortage of skilled labour, as the business shifted to bring more of its building services in-house and new development sites began to stack up. With projects lined up for the next eight years for housing providers including Fife, Angus and Aberdeen Councils, First Endeavour LLP have invested in machine control, 3D designs, project monitoring and reporting technology with SITECH. This includes four excavator Trimble 3D Earthworks Kits, a Trimble total station, a GNSS Rover and a drone with Trimble Stratus and Trimble Business Centre modelling software giving the company a complete start to finish solution – helping to make productivity, efficiency and safety gains which give them a competitive advantage Scott Napier, Engineering Manager at First Endeavour, said: “We’ve purchased four 20 tonne excavators and two 14 tonne excavators which SITECH have fitted with Trimble, technology, and we’ve just purchased a 35-tonne excavator and two dump trucks which means we can do our own cut and fill so we’re making some big investments now. “When we began discussions with Liam at SITECH we were looking for two more engineers and he explained how the technology could help us to progress projects, because we’re so busy with so many sites going through planning that I need to survey and engineer them as efficiently as possible and iron out any issues quickly. “Surveying using the drone and Trimble Stratus has been a revelation to us as it is a one-stop shop. As soon as we purchase a site we now go out and survey it with the drone then the data goes into the Trimble Stratus software and I get the worksite map back within hours which I can go into and get all sorts of measurements and estimate volumes. “Our surveyors are using it now to calculate volumes, completed distances and distances to be completed, and we give our clients access to the platform so they can see their site in its entirety while it’s in progress – which they really like. “From the office I can see where everything is being moved to and from, which saves me a lot of time with site visits. The Trimble Works Manager is fantastic for me as I can make changes, troubleshoot problems, and send solutions straight to the excavator.” SITECH provided ongoing training and systems support to Scott so he could have full confidence in the new systems, and he admits that while some of their operators had concerns about using the machine control technology at first, they now love how simple it is to use and the degree of accuracy it delivers. “It’s so easy to use Trimble that I can’t fault it or the team at SITECH who always come back to me within the hour if I have an issue,” Scott added. “We’ve not finished investing in connected site technology, as we’ve saved over 15% on concrete alone just in relation to doing footings because of the accuracy of the GPS. This may not seem a lot, but at the volume of concrete we use it means the kit has almost paid for itself – and that’s not considering the time savings in terms of manpower. “We now have a one-stop shop for projects from inception to completion and the technology from SITECH has certainly exceeded our expectations.”                                                Liam Payne, Regional Sales Representative at SITECH UK & Ireland, a former site engineer himself, said the accuracy of the GPS technology means customers can work well within tolerances, while the GPS setups along with drone mapping through Trimble Stratus can halve engineer labour time on site profiling roads or setting up batter rails which are time-consuming tasks. He added: “It can also eliminate health and safety concerns for site operatives, helping to minimise the risk of suffering trips or falls and reducing the risks present when working around deep excavations.” “We gave Scott a demo on the Trimble SPS986 GPS rover, SPS720 Total Station and Trimble TSC7 survey controller then we talked about drone surveying because Scott oversees multiple sites which would take days to survey and process using more traditional methods. Stratus can carry out a survey in less than an hour and you receive it a few hours later fully processed ready to share with colleagues or clients.” “Having supported Scott and his team to implement the technology from day one I’m really excited to follow them on their journey. Initially Scott and some of his excavator operators were quite apprehensive about using the technology but now they wouldn’t go back, and it’s exciting to see how it is helping First Endeavour LLP to grow.” To find out more about the construction technology, software and specialist services and training SITECH UK & Ireland offers, visit the website at www.sitechukandireland.com. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals

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SITECH EXPERT TECHNOLOGY TRAINING AT STORY PLANT INCREASES OPERATOR EFFICIENCY

Story Plant is a specialist plant hirer to the UK rail industry which operates a diverse fleet of road rail vehicles fitted with SITECH® Trimble Technology to ensure quality, safety, and delivery in a sector where timescales are tight, and delays are costly. Based in Carlisle, Cumbria, Story Plant have a historic relationship of using SITECH machine control systems spanning over 15 years, so when an influx of new operators and a transition from the Trimble GCS900 system across to Trimble Earthworks meant they needed training support they approached the team at SITECH. Story Plant carry out works with multiple clients across the UK, and they are now growing their customer base within the Midlands which has led to an increase in their fleet and number of operators.  Mark Bruce, head of technical development at Story Plant, said: “We rely heavily on our machines and the Trimble system to get things right and we currently have six dozer machines configured with the tech. “We found that different clients want to use different configurations of the Trimble system, often our operators would only use one system for a period of time and would then require a refresher when they needed to switch to a different configuration. “Solving that skill fade was important because we need our teams to have confidence in the system they’re using. Working within the rail industry you must get the work done right first time, because timescales are tight and as there’s a closure on the rail network there are severe consequences for delays.  “As well as meeting tight timescales, we place significant importance on carrying out our work safely. This involves working in areas with restricted space, such as tunnels and viaducts, so having confidence in the systems they are using allows our teams to focus on safe delivery.”  “We’re also in the process of transitioning from the old Trimble GCS900 system across to Trimble Earthworks, so we approached SITECH to see if they could create a series of quick reference videos as refreshers for our operators on things like setting up the system and simple fault fixes, which they can watch on their tablet or mobile phone.  “The training videos are just one example of our good relationship with the team at SITECH, as they also supported us earlier this year when we bought a Caterpillar D6K2 dozer, the largest dozer on the UK rail infrastructure. Because of the restricted space it operates in, it has a unique folding blade fitted which the SITECH team analysed to ensure the mast is located   in exactly the right position when the Trimble system is in use.” To find out more about the construction technology, software and services SITECH UK & Ireland offers, visit the website https://www.sitechukandireland.com.

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SITECH expert training at Story plant helps operators meet tight timescales

Story Plant is a specialist plant hirer to the UK rail industry which operates a diverse fleet of road rail vehicles fitted with SITECH® Trimble Technology to ensure quality, safety, and delivery in a sector where timescales are tight, and delays are costly. Based in Carlisle, Cumbria, Story Plant have a historic relationship of using SITECH machine control systems spanning over 15 years, so when an influx of new operators and a transition from the Trimble GCS900 system across to Trimble Earthworks meant they needed training support they approached the team at SITECH. Story Plant carry out works with multiple clients across the UK, and they are now growing their customer base within the Midlands which has led to an increase in their fleet and number of operators.  Mark Bruce, head of technical development at Story Plant, said: “We rely heavily on our machines and the Trimble system to get things right and we currently have six dozer machines configured with the tech. “We found that different clients want to use different configurations of the Trimble system, often our operators would only use one system for a period of time and would then require a refresher when they needed to switch to a different configuration. “Solving that skill fade was important because we need our teams to have confidence in the system they’re using. Working within the rail industry you must get the work done right first time, because timescales are tight and as there’s a closure on the rail network there are severe consequences for delays.  “As well as meeting tight timescales, we place significant importance on carrying out our work safely. This involves working in areas with restricted space, such as tunnels and viaducts, so having confidence in the systems they are using allows our teams to focus on safe delivery.”  “We’re also in the process of transitioning from the old Trimble GCS900 system across to Trimble Earthworks, so we approached SITECH to see if they could create a series of quick reference videos as refreshers for our operators on things like setting up the system and simple fault fixes, which they can watch on their tablet or mobile phone.  “The training videos are just one example of our good relationship with the team at SITECH, as they also supported us earlier this year when we bought a Caterpillar D6K2 dozer, the largest dozer on the UK rail infrastructure. Because of the restricted space it operates in, it has a unique folding blade fitted which the SITECH team analysed to ensure the mast is located   in exactly the right position when the Trimble system is in use.” To find out more about the construction technology, software and services SITECH UK & Ireland offers, visit the website https://www.sitechukandireland.com.

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Protecting an entire construction technology fleet

Construction technology is a large investment that businesses are usually willing to make to improve operations. However, the construction industry rarely invests in a warranty or service plan to protect new equipment. Here Lisa Cheshire, Inside Sales Specialist at SITECH® UK & Ireland, A Trimble Authorised Dealer, discusses how construction customer Galtec chose to go from no warranty, to a fully protected fleet to help reduce costs. Galtec provides civil engineering and groundworks for the housing industry throughout south-west England. Protecting their assets and maximising uptime has always been high on Galtec’s agenda but they had not yet invested in a warranty. With expert, money saving guidance from the team at SITECH, they decided to invest in a four-year Trimble Protection Plan on all 14 of their Trimble kits. In doing this Galtec have minimised the risk of unexpected, costly call outs and covered the cost of routine recalibration and replacements. Businesses typically protect their fleet in different ways, depending on the age of their technology. Newer products remain under factory warranty for set periods of time. Further protection can be taken out as warranties end, ensuring that they are always fully protected. There is flexibility to choose how long components are protected for and protection can cover selected set periods. For instance, if a construction business has a large job that is running for a year, they can take protection out on the equipment just for that period. Galtec chose to invest in protecting its technology fleet on an ongoing basis by opting for a four-year plan, meaning they will not have to renew their plan during this time. “Our fleet protection plan has given us the peace of mind that we won’t have any unexpected bills to pay if machines break down in the middle of a job for the next four years,” explained Jim Swift, GPS Manager at Galtec. “When a part needs to be taken off site and repaired, SITECH quickly turns the part round, so we have as little downtime as possible.” “Galtec immediately understood the value that the Trimble Protection Plan would give” Carl Parsons, Regional Sales Manager at SITECH UK & Ireland explained. “The cheapest technology part to replace typically costs more than an entire year’s warranty, so Galtec will quickly see a return on investment as its parts are recalibrated, serviced and replaced over time.” Compared to the costs of a construction machine, investing the small cost to fully protect a fleet from any eventuality and get access to experienced technology professionals will provide clear return on investment. To find out more about reducing downtime on your construction site, visit the website http://www.sitechukandireland.com/products or call Lisa Cheshire to start the discussion about your Trimble Protection Plan options on 07736631988. 

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HOW DRONES ARE CHANGING CONSTRUCTION

The PwC’s membership network report, Skies without Limits, recently revealed that drone technology is expected to uplift the UK’s construction industry by £8.6 bn by 2030. This growth was largely attributed to innovation and improved productivity. As drone technology becomes more sophisticated, it can offer a range of benefits for civil contractors. Here Ian Barnes, Director at SITECH UK & Ireland, the leading distributor of Trimble® technology, shares his thoughts on the benefits of drones. In the last few years, improvements in drone and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) technology has changed how we use them — they are no longer viewed as just high-tech toys. The use of drones has particularly increased in the construction industry to help businesses improve accuracy and productivity. Additionally, as purchase and set up costs gradually decrease to make the technology more affordable, more construction and civil engineering businesses can benefit from the technology. There are several benefits of using drones on site, such as improving survey accuracy of large areas without difficulty, collecting and sharing data, and improving health and safety. Improving these areas can help companies keep their infrastructure projects on track and avoid costly delays. Let’s take a closer look at some of their benefits. Progress tracking According to a study from Engineers Daily, design errors account for 38 percent of construction disputes. Inaccurate and incomplete designs can push projects behind schedule and over budget as confusion mounts. Progress tracking in drones can limit these issues by capturing highly accurate site data.  Contractors simply fly the drone to collect data when it’s required, meaning that there’s no need to halt construction work to complete surveys.  Collected data can then be uploaded to a cloud-based platform where contractors can access the data anywhere, anytime and easily interpret the information. “Civil contractors and surveyors can use the technology to produce weekly progress reports to share across the company and to stakeholders,” explained Jan Wouter Kruyt, Director of European Operations at Propeller, who teamed up with SITECH to develop the Trimble Stratus® drone package. “More accurate progress tracking can boost overall efficiency while minimising disputes that can often derail projects. For instance, contractors can highlight the parts of a site that they are excavating and provide an estimate on how long this will take and plan the next stages of construction accordingly.” Mapping sites As well as surveying, innovations in drone software now allows contractors to produce detailed 3D maps and models using the data and site footage that they gather from flights. This highly accurate site data can cut costs because the detailed visualisations help teams align on their activities and reduce the risk of design errors that require rework later down the line.  For example, Trimble® Stratus, powered by Propeller, uses a data analytics and visualisation platform to capture geo-referenced high-resolution aerial images. All they need to do is lay out their ground control points and fly the drones, enabling them to access highly accurate topographic surveys without causing bottlenecks. As with progress tracking, when 3D mapping is combined with a suitable analytics platform, you can communicate this data across your team and with third parties. Contractors can store and share a single source of truth across the cloud instead of running around with a pencil and a piece of paper. Improved digital mapping also means that every member of the team is aware of the site’s landscape, is working from the same information and immediately receives any updates. Instead of taking hours, or even days to cover the site on foot, all you need to do is fly the drone — providing a real field-to-finish solution for mapping sites. Health and safety According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) annual report in 2019, slips, trips and falls were the second highest cause of injuries and fatalities in the UK construction industry. Construction companies and shareholders are understandably concerned with any injuries on site and are looking for ways to minimise risk. Drones can quickly complete surveys in dangerous areas and take contractors out of the high-risk areas where these injuries could occur. Drones are piloted remotely, and this is essential when surveying sites where it is too risky to send people. In quarries, for example, surveying requires people to move around rocky and uneven surfaces that can put people in danger. Some sites also have dangerous structures or hazardous and flammable materials on-site that workers should not be in close proximity to. Instead of sending out engineers with pegs, operators can stay at a safe distance and easily fly the drone over the area to collect data, saving the surveyor time and minimising risk in the process. As drone technology becomes more sophisticated and accessible to contractors, it could deliver real productivity benefits while minimising risk to workers. It’s hardly surprising that the construction industry will receive a £8.6 bn lift over the next ten years because of these innovations. Drone flights and data processing provided in an easy to use package that covers workflow, data clarity and the practical is just one of the services developed by SITECH to support the digital worksite. For more information on how you can successfully set up your drone flights, visit https://www.sitechukandireland.com/sitech-drone-services/.

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WHAT DOES THE CONSTRUCTION SITE OF THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?

The construction site will be human-free by 2050. That’s what Balfour Beatty predicted in its Innovation 2050 report back in 2017. While 2050 is far in our future, technology is already changing how we work on construction sites. Here Carl Parsons, regional sales manager of heavy civil solutions at SITECH, the UK and Ireland’s sole distributor of Trimble® machine control technology, makes his predictions about the site of the future. Balfour Beatty predicted that, in thirty years’ time, robots will complete most tasks on a construction site. This prediction seems far away from the common perception of construction as predominantly manual, dirty and dangerous tasks completed by an ageing workforce. While it is true that the construction industry still relies on manual processes to complete many operations, technology is already greatly benefitting contractors. Embracing construction technology could guarantee the success of construction companies in the future by improving the efficiency of their current workforce, combating the growing skills gap and helping them to be more competitive. So, if the UK construction industry invested in technology, what would the site of the future look like? Better connection One of the simplest, but most effective, improvements that technology can make is in communication. Slow communication can cause big issues on a construction site — if surveyors and machine operators work from different versions of the design, they may find that the completed work is incorrect and will have to budget for reworking. Reworking also increases the possibility that the contractors will not meet the agreed deadline of the project. By moving from paper to digital design files, surveyors can improve how they distribute and communicate information. They can also use Trimble WorksManager software to consolidate designs and check, at a glance, that every machine and person is using the same computer aided design (CAD) file. Everyone working to the same design reduces the risk of error and consequential reworking. Most contractors use file transfer technology to send converted CAD plans straight from the architect to the cab. To achieve the technology’s full potential, construction managers can set up two-way communication, by also sending information from the cab back to the office. Operators can send real time data about the work they’ve done during the day to the office immediately, allowing the surveyor to clearly track progress. Better connectivity also means more opportunities for remote collaboration. Surveyors no longer have to be on site to communicate changes to the team and can oversee multiple projects from one location, reducing the time lost to travel. Architects can also adapt their designs from anywhere in the world and immediately send it to site, suggesting that in the future, a fully connected site will not be limited by geographical location and we’ll see more global collaboration.   Autonomous machines Contractors that use conventional machinery rely on people for accuracy. Multiple workers will operate near an excavator to check for accuracy — one in the cab, one watching the machine and one checking levels of material. However, relying on the human eye means that there are multiple opportunities for human error to negatively impact productivity. Excavators may be digging in the wrong area, at the wrong depth or angle or might remove more material than necessary — and putting material back is more costly than removing it.   Machine control technology allows a machine operator to complete the accurately without assistance from others, saving costs in time and labour. Operators immediately access information about where to dig and to what depth directly from the digital plans. They can then input the data into the excavator so that it will always operate accurately, reducing costs in new materials. In the future we’ll see an increase in understanding about the value of this technology, as construction businesses see how improved accuracy saves time, fuel and material. For it to fully take off, contractors will need to prove the benefits of the technology to third parties. For example, consultants and architects aren’t usually aware of what information the contractors need to use machine control technology efficiently and still offer 2D or even paper versions of the CAD design. This then requires the engineer to completely recreate the design digitally again. If contractors can clearly communicate why they need the data itself, outside parties will contribute the required data and ensure projects go to plan. Simpler surveying Traditional site surveying requires engineers to walk the site and add level posts (Travellers) so that operators know how much material to excavate. This is a costly and time-consuming process that often delays the commencement of work.  Also, if any posts are accidentally moved or fall due to weather conditions, the site manager must organise an engineer to come and replace the levels at an additional cost. Drone surveys are now becoming more common, as the technology can survey thousands points quickly and accurately — completing the task in minutes rather than hours using traditional methods. Drones can also collect and process data immediately, sending relevant information straight back to surveyors and machines.   We’ll see drones used more in the future for regular site surveys. Surveyors can install a dedicated Ground Control Stations on site and fly the drone regularly to check work is going according to schedule once every few days or weeks, depending on the length of the project, and send the information back to the office. Drone technology can also collect data in areas where engineers might struggle to record accurate information safely, such as measuring blasts in a quarry, monitoring levels in landfills or large stockpiles. A new type of reality Augmented reality (AR) technology will play a large role in how we interact with future construction sites. Technologies such as Trimble® SiteVision allow surveyors to superimpose the design onto the site, to fully understand how the work they complete fits into the final design. Machine operators can also use the same technology integrated into Trimble® Earthworks to superimpose cut and fill values onto machine buckets when moving

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New training academy for construction technology

SITECH UK & Ireland, the leading distributor of Trimble® machine control technology for the heavy and civil construction industry, has launched a new training Academy to support operators using construction technology. The Academy includes a selection of courses delivered through distance learning, practical demonstrations and face-to-face classrooms sessions. Sessions are suitable for everyone, from beginners to advanced users, meaning operators at all levels can refine their skills and expertise. Machine control technology and site positioning systems provide construction firms with highly accurate data, lower surveying costs and improved efficiency, giving businesses a competitive edge in a market that is rapidly digitalising. However, a certain level of operator skill is essential to achieve these benefits. Operators must receive thorough training to ensure that machine control hardware and software is used to its full potential and that the business achieves good return on investment. The Academy involves a SITECH-certified series of face-to-face training sessions — all delivered in line with Government social distancing guidelines. The courses are split into several categories, including on-machine, off machine (site positioning), site software, surveyor, lasers and levels, and professional services such as drones. “Machine control technology gives businesses a huge competitive advantage and the ability to tender for large infrastructure projects. However, a key issue for operators is getting the right training from the start,” explained David Allen, Technical Support Manager at SITECH UK & Ireland. “That is why we have devised such a thorough training programme, to make sure construction businesses can perform at their absolute best. We’ve thought about the individual too, all courses from basic- to advanced-level are available in visual and audio formats to accommodate the individual learner.” “The course content has been developed by SITECH’s experienced team and each trainer has been certified by Trimble’s Train the Trainer course,” said Ian Barnes, Head of Business at SITECH UK & Ireland. “But their knowledge isn’t just academic — each trainer works hands-on with machine control, site positioning and Trimble software on a regular basis, which means we can guarantee a skilled and knowledgeable tutor for each course.” Whether you’re just starting out or are an industry expert, the SITECH Academy can ensure that your skills and knowledge are at their best when using Trimble technology. Visit our website to book a course https://www.sitechukandireland.com/training/.

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IMPROVED PROGRESS TRACKING FOR EARTHMOVING

SITECH UK & Ireland, the leading distributor of Trimble® technology, now offers an innovative progress tracking software solution that uses drones to help site managers map, measure and manage their sites more effectively. Trimble® Stratus, powered by Propeller, is a data analytics and visualisation platform that is designed specifically for earthmoving applications to help contractors track progress and productivity. Harnessing the power of highly accurate surveying and mapping capabilities, contractors are able to avoid costly delays and minimise rework. Unlike other industries that are embracing digitalisation, earthworks and construction have traditionally lagged behind and have been slow to innovate. For example, many construction companies still rely on traditional methods of surveying, such as pegs, to map a project. This often requires skilled surveyors that can make the necessary calculations and interpret the data. However, their time on site is limited, and it isn’t always easy to access this expertise when you need it. SITECH now supplies Trimble® Stratus to help construction companies digitise and overcome common surveying issues. The new package uses Trimble’s ® Connected Site solutions and delivers a new end-to-end solution for contractors. This means that contractors can place and activate their ground control points and then fly their drone to collect site data. Using Trimble® Stratus, you can then upload and view this data and share it between the site, office and across the team. This can help prevent miscommunication and ensure that everyone in the company is updated on site progress. “If manual surveys are inaccurate, construction companies can see a decline in performance and see delays that mean they fall behind schedule and go over budget,” explained Ian Barnes, Head of Business at SITECH UK & Ireland. “By using drone technology, surveyors can access highly accurate data to ensure operations remain on schedule. Companies can also remove employees from difficult to access and dangerous areas, like quarries, improving safety as well as accuracy.” “While other software tries to accommodate a broad category of users, Trimble Stratus is 100 percent focused on earthmoving and construction environments,” explained Jan Wouter Kruyt, Director of European Operations at Propeller. “The cloud-based platform is also really intuitive and can be used without surveying expertise ─ the drone images are processed in Trimble Stratus and then visualised as an interactive, measurable 3D terrain models. It’s easy to create and share measurements on these 3D maps. “The new package delivers several benefits for construction companies, including capabilities to compare designs and minimise rework by generating highly accurate survey data,” continued Kruyt. “Most importantly, having frequent up-to-date survey data on hand means that companies can complete projects ahead of schedule and under budget, something that’s becoming more important as companies try to get back on track following lockdown.” “Trimble® Stratus is ground-breaking for construction companies that want to enhance their surveying,” continued Barnes. “By harnessing the power of drone technology and combining this with a Trimble® platform, contractors now have access to highly accurate progress tracking with a solution designed specifically for earthworks projects like theirs.” Interested in using Trimble® Stratus to help you plan your site? Visit our website and find out more about what we offer https://www.sitechukandireland.com/sitech-drone-services/.

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