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Powerful new policy report shows path to net zero with timber

Powerful new policy report shows path to net zero with timber

Timber Development UK (TDUK) – the UK’s trade association for the timber supply chain – in collaboration with Waugh Thistleton Architects – have released a study on policies from across the globe which encourage the use of timber in construction. Timber Policy is a comparative study of policies, across six

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TDUK publishes comprehensive new library of Timber Knowledge Sheets

TDUK publishes comprehensive new library of Timber Knowledge Sheets

Timber Development UK (TDUK) has just published the first set of its huge new library of Timber Knowledge Sheets – with 50+ now available for download. The new knowledge sheets introduce and answer common questions about every aspect of working with wood, from the difference between hardwood and softwood, through

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Timber Development UK launches ‘Timber Typologies’ at FOOTPRINT+

Timber Development UK launches ‘Timber Typologies’ at FOOTPRINT+

A guide to understanding construction options for low-carbon developers. Timber Development UK (TDUK) – the UK’s trade association for the timber supply chain – has launched a new guide to understanding options for timber construction. Aimed at developers, investors and policy makers, Timber Typologies outlines the variety of build options

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Latest Issue

BDC 318 : Jul 2024

TDUK

Import volumes rallied during the second half of 2023, TDUK data shows

Import volumes rallied during the second half of 2023, TDUK data shows

Timber import volumes in 2023 continued to improve as the year progressed, with total volumes for the full year likely to be only slightly behind 2022’s figures, according to the latest TDUK statistics. Timber import statistics for November 2023 show the market continued to improve in 2023, relative to 2022, with total import volumes for the full year likely to be only slightly behind 2022’s figures. Import volumes in the month of November 2023 were 0.9% higher than in November 2022. The deficit in the cumulative annual volume of the UK’s timber and panel imports after 11 months of 2023, compared to the same period in 2022, reduced once again to stand at around 117,000m3 – down from 123,000m3 last month. This cumulative reduction in volume of all imports in 2023 to November over 2022 was 1.3%. This is a significant improvement on earlier in the year, as during the spring import volumes were on track to be the lowest since 2013, but imports during the second half of the year allayed any fear of this being the case. The loss in volume peaked at 384.000m3 in May 2023 and has reduced each month since to stand at 117,000m3, or just 1.3%, below 2022. The 0.9% growth in the month of November completed six months of consecutive growth of the combined volume of the main timber, panels and engineered wood products imported by the UK. This better second-half performance has been realised largely through higher softwood, hardwood plywood, OSB and MDF imports. Solid wood imports over the first 11 months of 2023 remain less than 1% lower than over the same period in 2022, with imports of panel products around 3% lower. TDUK Head of Technical and Trade, Nick Boulton, said: “It’s encouraging to see main timber import volumes have now seen six months of consecutive growth in the second half of 2023, with statistics for the year just 1.3% below 2022 levels. “This supports our belief – and the CPA forecasts – that while the market may be challenging for the coming months, particularly in the core newbuild housing and RMI sectors, better times lie ahead. “It’s important to remember that while 2024 may have started slowly, this is likely to be an election year and the political parties will soon begin to set out their manifestos and plans for the construction and housebuilding sectors. The industry is expected to see recovery begin in 2025 post-General Election, and we look forward to learning how the different political parties plan to support the move towards timber as a core low-carbon building material, as has already been set out in the Government’s Timber in Construction Roadmap.” This month’s statistics also contain a summary of the latest Construction Products Association’s forecasts for 2024 and beyond, with a focus on newbuild and private housing RMI. TDUK members can read the full report here. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals

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Powerful new policy report shows path to net zero with timber

Powerful new policy report shows path to net zero with timber

Timber Development UK (TDUK) – the UK’s trade association for the timber supply chain – in collaboration with Waugh Thistleton Architects – have released a study on policies from across the globe which encourage the use of timber in construction. Timber Policy is a comparative study of policies, across six countries, which can act as a powerful tool to support policy makers on their journey to decarbonise construction in the UK, and beyond. Commissioned by TDUK and written by Waugh Thistleton Architects, this new report follows hot on the heels of the UK Government’s Timber in Construction (TiC) Roadmap, which aims to safely increase the use of timber in construction. Timber is a low-carbon, natural, renewable material, at the heart of transitioning to a sustainable, circular economy for the UK and many nations around the world. This study is a snapshot of a rapidly evolving movement. David Hopkins, chief executive of Timber Development UK said: “What we need to see this year is ambition turned to action. This means forward looking policy – and politicians brave enough to create a framework which places value on low-carbon construction. “Timber is the ultimate low-carbon material, and countries across the developed world have rightly recognized this – working to create comprehensive policy frameworks that support the growth of the timber industry. “The UK Government’s roadmap is a fantastic starting point, but without more action, there is a risk the UK falls behind. We need a clear timeline for change, starting with limits on embodied carbon in buildings, which is currently unregulated. “Embodied carbon can account for more than half of the emissions of a building over its lifetime – hundreds of thousands of tonnes of carbon per year – but this is currently ignored by UK politicians and policy makers. “Our new book, commissioned by TDUK and written by Waugh Thistleton Architects, highlights the policies being put in place in a variety of countries around the world. “The UK Government, if they are serious about achieving the goals of their roadmap, now need to look at what policies would work in the UK. We hope that these examples give food for thought and we can start to engage policy makers on making this happen, rather than simply relying on the market to change. “This year we must turn pockets of excellence, like the Stirling Prize winning Goldsmith Street, the Phoenix Development in Lewes, or the pioneering Black & White Building from exceptions to the norm. The opportunity has never been greater.” Andrew Waugh, director and co-founder, Waugh Thistleton Architects, said: “As pioneers in timber construction, we are proud to collaborate with TDUK to author the Timber Policy Book. Working at the forefront of global timber construction and participating in extensive research with European partners, we understand first-hand the impact of government policies on sustainable, low-carbon construction.  “While the UK once led the world in mass timber construction, recent years have seen a shift in global leadership. Recent assessments, such as the Climate Change Committee’s critique of the UK Government’s Carbon Budget Delivery Plan, highlight the urgent need for accelerated policy development in the UK. “While we commend initiatives like the Timber in Construction Roadmap, our research for Timber Policy reveals that current UK efforts fall short of addressing the urgency of the climate crisis. Bold leadership, as demonstrated by progressive nations such as France, Germany, The Netherlands and Denmark, mandating limits on embodied carbon and investing in sustainable timber projects, is essential for a meaningful transition to a low-carbon future. The Roadmap sets out timelines to consider options, encourage voluntary reporting, and seek advice, after which revisions to policy will be put in place. The Timber Policy Guide shows how this process has already happened in the six example countries and policies which have already been implemented.    “Despite challenges, some progress in the UK is evident; for example, the DfE’s flagship project to standardise mass timber school fabrication underscores its commitment to innovation. Additionally, the Mass Timber Insurance Playbook and New Model Building Guides, funded by Built by Nature, a philanthropic organisation, provide invaluable resources for navigating the complexities of timber construction. “The urgency of climate action cannot be overstated. With projections indicating a 1.5-degree increase in global temperatures by 2050 and up to 3 degrees by the end of the century, decisive steps must be taken. The Timber Policy book serves as a beacon of hope, illustrating how public-private partnerships can drive systemic change towards a sustainable future.” Embodied carbon is recognised by major policy influencers such as the United Nations, Royal Society and World Green Building Council, and in the UK by the likes of the Climate Change Committee and Environmental Audit Committee as crucial to overcoming climate change. Despite a wide array of evidence and calls from these bodies to implement key policies, such as the regulation of embodied carbon, there has been a highly variable policy approach across the world. The UK, once positioned as a leader in sustainable construction using timber, now lags behind many other nations due to its regulatory environment. With this book, Timber Policy, we outline how six different countries around the world are helping to support the transition to low-carbon construction. This is the second in a trio of essential books, with the first edition Timber Typologies providing clarity on different timber systems. The final book in the series, Timber LCA, will demystify lifetime carbon analysis for timber buildings. Collectively, these books are intended to act as a stimulus for action – in the UK, and beyond. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals

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TDUK publishes comprehensive new library of Timber Knowledge Sheets

TDUK publishes comprehensive new library of Timber Knowledge Sheets

Timber Development UK (TDUK) has just published the first set of its huge new library of Timber Knowledge Sheets – with 50+ now available for download. The new knowledge sheets introduce and answer common questions about every aspect of working with wood, from the difference between hardwood and softwood, through to acoustic regulations, Eurocode 5 principles, embodied carbon, and sourcing timber sustainably. Developed with experts from Edinburgh Napier University, and TDUK’s unrivalled membership network of supply, manufacture and design professionals, these 50+ knowledge sheets are the first batch of a planned 140 to help support the industry to build better with wood. TDUK chief executive, David Hopkins says: “Following the merger between the Timber Trade Federation and TRADA last year, we promised to connect the timber supply chain, lead best practice, and accelerate a low-carbon future. “Our Timber Knowledge Sheets are another example of us doing exactly that – and represent a big step towards our vision of the UK as a country where timber is the number one material choice for all construction projects. “Amidst a climate emergency, changing how we build is crucial – as it represents a major portion of our carbon footprint. The material and design choices we make today will shape the future we have tomorrow. “Timber is an existing, proven solution to how we construct a low-carbon future, with independent studies showing that methods such as timber frame have up to 20% lower embodied carbon than traditional masonry.[1] “Fundamentally, trees absorb carbon, and when turned into long term construction products, can store it for decades if not millennia. Most other materials you find on building sites do the exact opposite – spewing tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere. “Taking on climate change requires collective action, so a big part of TDUK’s mission is to make sure that everyone in the timber supply chain has the opportunity, the tools, and the knowledge to succeed. “These sheets, released today, add considerable depth to our online library, which is already the largest, most comprehensive source of timber knowledge in the UK. This will support all to build better with wood.” These new Knowledge Sheets touch on all topics timber, so whether you are an architect, engineer, designer, builder, installer, contractor, or merchant, or any other member of the timber supply chain, you’ll find a wealth of information packed within. Between pages, you will find introductions to all kinds of timber components and methods of timber construction – all described in an accessible and easy to understand fashion – from Lightweight Timber Frame Construction to Modern Methods and Offsite Timber Construction. The Knowledge Sheets also contain plenty of regulatory guidance, ‘best practice’ information for working on site, as well as practical introductions to working with timber in challenging contexts such as flood-prone areas. Everything from the day-to-day (such as Loft Conversions or Timber Flooring) to the more specialised (Upgrading Doors for Fire Resistance) is covered, along with all aspects of sustainability – from Carbon Cycle and Storage through to Trees and Timber. These Timber Knowledge Sheets follow hot on the heels of the recently published Span Tables for C16 and C24 timber, which have already proven incredibly popular. TDUK members have access to our entire Knowledge Library, which along with these 50+ Timber Knowledge Sheets, includes briefs, case studies, research summaries and more. A further 90 Timber Knowledge Sheets are to be published imminently. While most Timber Knowledge Sheets are members only, anyone can access and download Timber Sizes & Tolerances, Timber and Embodied Carbon, or Construction Site Timber Best Practice with a free user account (register here) To get started on your new timber journey, simply go to www.timberdevelopment.uk, whether you are just beginning or a seasoned expert. If you work with wood, you already belong. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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Timber Development UK launches ‘Timber Typologies’ at FOOTPRINT+

Timber Development UK launches ‘Timber Typologies’ at FOOTPRINT+

A guide to understanding construction options for low-carbon developers. Timber Development UK (TDUK) – the UK’s trade association for the timber supply chain – has launched a new guide to understanding options for timber construction. Aimed at developers, investors and policy makers, Timber Typologies outlines the variety of build options and methodologies available for low carbon timber construction and details the sort of building types each method is suitable or appropriate for. Written with Waugh Thistleton Architects, one of the leading ‘timber first’ architects’ practices in the UK, the book is intended as a primer or beginners guide to the variety of timber solutions available. It will help decision makers understand the options open to them and make the right choices to deliver the best outcomes. David Hopkins, chief executive at Timber Development UK, said: “Timber is vital when it comes to decarbonising construction. However, if it is going to realise its full potential, we can no longer talk in simple generic terms about this material. We need to be specific about the systems and approaches available and the benefits and risks each of these can bring. “We can’t make progress if clients, architects and policy makers are talking at cross purposes about what they mean when they talk about building in timber.” Alastair Ogle, associate at Waugh Thistleton Architects, and one of the lead authors of the book, said: “We still see enormous amounts of misinformation and misunderstanding when it comes to timber. Clients, local authorities and even insurers don’t seem to understand that all of these things they refer to as “timber” are in fact a wide range of completely different build systems with very different properties. “We’re committed to helping design and enable a low-carbon building revolution, but that will only come when we increase understanding across the market. We hope this will in turn increase confidence in permitting, designing, insuring and constructing the low-carbon timber buildings of the future.” Timber Typologies is the first in a trio of books aimed at increasing understanding options among the decision makers. It will be accompanied by Timber Policy – a guide to the variety of ways countries and city authorities are encouraging timber construction around the world, and Timber LCA, examining comparisons of lifecycle analysis between buildings constructed of different materials. You can download Timber Typologies for free from the Timber Development UK website.

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