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March 16, 2016

Great Western Developments & Sellar Paddington Display Dedication to Infrastructure

Great Western Developments and Sellar Paddington Limited have recently restated their dedication to developing Paddington’s transport infrastructure and public realm through £65m of investment projects into improving the struggling London infrastructure of present. The pair have proposed the development of a £1bn mixed-use development, which will aim to transform the

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Know Your Chains: Supply Chain Transparency and the Modern Slavery Act

According to the 2014 Global Slavery Index, 35.8 million men, women and children are trapped globally in various forms of modern slavery, a concept covering slavery, servitude, forced and compulsory labour and human trafficking. The UK is not immune, with Home Office figures suggesting there are up to 13,000 victims

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Featuring HVAC: Interview with Ian Davey, Director of HVAC

Originally founded back in 1985, HVAC is a specialist in the provision of tailored mechanical and electrical solutions, incorporating general ventilation, kitchen ventilation, air conditioning, electrical and pipework services to provide a comprehensive offering for clients. And it is this ability to deliver a fully turnkey solution to clients which

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BDC 317 : Jun 2024

March 16, 2016

Great Western Developments & Sellar Paddington Display Dedication to Infrastructure

Great Western Developments and Sellar Paddington Limited have recently restated their dedication to developing Paddington’s transport infrastructure and public realm through £65m of investment projects into improving the struggling London infrastructure of present. The pair have proposed the development of a £1bn mixed-use development, which will aim to transform the locality into one supporting the key transport hub, and will include a 72 storey residential development, designed by Renzo Piano. The proposal, however, is still under review, but has already garnered positive comment from Network Rail, TfL, NHS London and much of the local business populace; with this in hand, the prospects presently look rather positive. Consultation is also on the books with any and all local stakeholders, with Great Western Developments and Sellar Paddington Limited both determinedly trying to cover all their bases in delivering the transport infrastructure now deemed vital for the support of London’s ever-expanding commercial and residential traffic. Additional benefits will see the expansion of public spaces, a reduction in the amount of congestion (a well-received note for Londoners) and also the development of a brand new social and commercial centre for the Paddington area, no doubt encouraging prosperity and further traffic. Of course, the project is heralded to have good timing, with the opening of Crossrail inherently implying that the traffic coming through Paddington station is to drastically increase over the coming times and, with the infrastructure not presently in a state fit for supporting this level of traffic, it is hoped that the pair’s keen work on the local area can prepare Paddinton as well as allowing for the local community to properly benefit from Crossrail 2. The growth expected is actually set to present Paddington with a similar level of traffic as with many of London’s largest stations, positioning the opportunity to take advantage of this level of traffic as one which cannot, and potentially should not be ignored.

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Know Your Chains: Supply Chain Transparency and the Modern Slavery Act

According to the 2014 Global Slavery Index, 35.8 million men, women and children are trapped globally in various forms of modern slavery, a concept covering slavery, servitude, forced and compulsory labour and human trafficking. The UK is not immune, with Home Office figures suggesting there are up to 13,000 victims of modern slavery across the UK. For the building and construction sector, modern slavery can be a significant problem, particularly for those operating in environments known for labour exploitation. For the estimated 12,000 organisations caught by the new reporting obligations under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 (MSA), the issue of what they are doing to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains will now be a serious compliance challenge. What is the reporting Obligation? The MSA requires organisations (body corporates and partnerships), supplying goods or services, with a minimum global turnover of £36 million (including turnover of subsidiaries) and carrying on business in the UK, to publish an annual “slavery and human trafficking statement” on their website. This is a statement of the steps taken to ensure modern slavery is not taking place in their own business or their supply chains. Organisations without a website must provide a copy of their statement within 30 days to anyone making a written request for one. Importantly, the statement must be approved by the board and signed by a director (or the equivalent for partnerships) to ensure there is top level responsibility for its content. Those with a financial year ending 31 March 2016 are the first required to report, with the Government expecting statements to be published within six months of financial year end. While there is no prescribed content of a statement, the MSA provides examples of what a statement may contain, including information on: the organisation’s structure, its business and its supply chains; its policies in relation to modern slavery; its due diligence processes in relation to modern slavery; the parts of its business and supply chains where there is a risk of modern slavery taking place and steps taken to assess and manage that risk; its effectiveness in ensuring that modern slavery is not taking place in its business or supply chains, measured against key performance indicators; and the training about modern slavery available to staff. The Government’s statutory guidance – Transparency in Supply Chains: A Practical Guide – provides further details on these themes. What steps can I take? A statement should be underpinned by a proportionate and risk-based approach and capable of withstanding scrutiny from key stakeholders, including shareholders and customers. Practical steps an organisation could take include adopting a modern slavery policy and supplier code of conduct; undertaking a risk assessment of existing suppliers and developing risk-based due diligence procedures for new suppliers; reviewing procurement procedures to ensure they are able to respond to labour exploitation; and updating contract terms to ensure suppliers are required to comply with policies on modern slavery and the MSA. What are the consequences for not reporting? Penalties under the MSA for failing to report are limited to a court injunction compelling the organisation to report. The Government intends that consumers, shareholders, civil society and the press will be the primary drivers of compliance. An organisation’s reputation is therefore most at risk from non-compliance, particularly if it operates in a sector, such as construction, already in focus for labour-related issues. By Brett Hartley (Pictured) of Clyde & Co

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Featuring HVAC: Interview with Ian Davey, Director of HVAC

Originally founded back in 1985, HVAC is a specialist in the provision of tailored mechanical and electrical solutions, incorporating general ventilation, kitchen ventilation, air conditioning, electrical and pipework services to provide a comprehensive offering for clients. And it is this ability to deliver a fully turnkey solution to clients which sets it apart from many of its direct competitors and enables the company to offer a service far more akin to comprehensive project management, than that of simple tin-bashing and supply. Not only does the company stand out from key competitors through being able to offer a fully turnkey company, but HVAC also excels in the way in which it provides this service. Understanding that no two projects are the same, the company has a framework of project delivery which is both flexible yet simultaneously structured to ensure the provision of a high quality cradle-to-grave service. But of course, whilst many companies might boast a similar ethos, with HVAC, it isn’t merely words alone, as the company’s ability to both develop and install its own products allows for a degree of flexibility that is second to none. As Ian Levin, current Business Development Manager for HVAC explains: “I actually know the company as both a customer and a supplier, and what attracted me to work here was the service provided in terms of product engineering and installation. The flexibility the company also brings is of note and, where other contractors might say ‘no’ or find it too awkward to fit in with a particular situation, HVAC is very flexible in that respect and we really do go the extra mile. It’s all about that can-do attitude, with the ability to say ‘yes’ before the question is even asked.” But of course, in enabling the company to do this, HVAC pursues an approach to business which supports the understanding of customer needs, possible only through close liaison. But of course, this level of communication isn’t pursued only at the outset, but through the entirety of project delivery as Levin continues: “Whilst we’re running a project we’ll keep in contact with the client all the way through. We’ll give them lots of feedback on the progress of the job. This means the customer isn’t left waiting, sitting back and hoping that no news is good news, but is instead kept up to date with everything that’s going on. Effectively, this makes the customer feel very looked after and doesn’t have to chase us all the time; we get to them before they get to us.“ Additionally, this flexibility and intuitive approach to product development and installation also allows for the company to operate in line with a safety-first agenda, not only developing products which are suited to the task at hand, but also ones which can be safely delivered, installed and maintained on a premise to ensure a level of corporate responsibility that goes well above and beyond the norm. As such, it is of no surprise that the company has already achieved OHS 18001 standard for health and safety in addition to being CHAS accredited and having further qualifications of ISO 19001 for quality, and ISO 14001 for environmental practices; truly, HVAC is a role model in responsible business and boasts an ingrained health and safety culture on each and every level of service delivery. Then providing comment on the CHAS audit, and the benefits which it has brought to the company, Ian Davey, Director of HVAC explains: “CHAS, from a customer perspective is expected for a lot of work and, because not everyone has come as far as we have with OHS 18001, CHAS is positioned as a bit more user friendly and ensures that contractor teams, if they don’t have the ISO accreditations in place, that they’re working with someone who has a comprehensive health and safety procedure in place, which we do.” Through these accreditations, it’s fair to say that HVAC maintains a very strong position within the industry, and one which we have no doubt it will continue to maintain. Looking to pursue a growth strategy tied to efficiencies in the coming times, only time will tell how the company fares ,but with such a sustained strategy in the pipeline, the future is surely bright.

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