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Actis CPD joins stable of RIBA approved training modules

Actis’ much praised and popular CPD on addressing the performance gap with reflective insulation has been approved to join the stable of Royal Institute of British Architects approved training modules. The CPD, which looks at how to combat thermal bridging and achieve optimal energy efficiency, will be available to RIBA

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Make a new project happen with a visionary idea

Jeremy Siegel of Bjarke Ingels Group urges us to seize the initiative and create transformative projects from scratch by harnessing community support. The coronavirus pandemic is, for many, prompting a re-evaluation of how and where we live and work. From the domestic level to city-wide, and from the regional to

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RIBA Is Hosting Dulux Trade Debate

Dulux Trade has assembled a panel of leading industry experts to share their design insights and initiatives under the theme, ‘Future Proofing Design’ at RIBA London later this month. The event, on February 26, will incorporate a presentation revealing the insights underpinning the ColourFutures™ 2019 palettes – the annual AkzoNobel

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Viridian Solar Celebrates Role in RIBA House of the Year

Viridian Solar is celebrating the announcement of the RIBA Grand Designs House of the Year 2018. The stunning Lochside House in the Scottish Highlands that won the accolade features roof integrated solar panels from the UK manufacturer. The house was designed by Cambridge Architects, Haysom Ward Miller and with its

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A Few Weeks Left for GAI Nominations

There are only a few weeks left for architects and specifiers to make their nominations for the internationally recognised biennial GAI/RIBA Architectural Ironmongery Specification Awards. Organised by the Guild of Architectural Ironmongers (GAI) in conjunction with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), the awards are designed to identify and

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RIBA to Launch New Innovative Building Contracts

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is launching two new and innovative building contracts next month (November 5). Designed to be used in conjunction with RIBA’s Architect’s Appointment Agreements for Small Projects (domestic and concise forms), the new contracts are fully aligned with the RIBA Plan of Work 2013.

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RIBA Appoints Alan Vallance as New Chief Executive

Following a competitive recruitment process, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has appointed Alan Vallance as its new Chief Executive. Vallance has a financial background, along with consulting, general management and strategic planning in Europe and Australasia. He joined RIBA in September last year as Interim Director of Finance

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RIBA Welcomes Nominations for Inspiring Teaching Award

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is welcoming nominations for the Annie Spink Award of inspiring teaching. The award recognises outstanding contributions to architectural education and is financed by the Annie Spink Trust Fund, passed on to the institute by architect Herbert Spink in 1974. The award honours the

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RIBA Joins Newly Launched Global Alliance for Urban Crises

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is now part of the freshly launched Global Alliance for Urban Crises. The Alliance was launched during the first ever World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in Istanbul and will bring together the Red Cross, Red Crescent, municipal government networks, UN agencies, urban professionals and

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BDC 318 : Jul 2024

RIBA

Actis CPD joins stable of RIBA approved training modules

Actis’ much praised and popular CPD on addressing the performance gap with reflective insulation has been approved to join the stable of Royal Institute of British Architects approved training modules. The CPD, which looks at how to combat thermal bridging and achieve optimal energy efficiency, will be available to RIBA chartered architects, who, along with their non-RIBA affiliated counterparts, must complete 35 hours of CPD every year. RIBA approved CPDs are worth double the points of a standard CPD and are therefore much prized by members, with 76% of them choosing training which has been specifically approved by the professional body. The Actis CPD, Addressing the performance gap with reflective insulation, which is currently available online, will be promoted via RIBA’s website, and the Institute’s monthly newsletter. Specification and technical teams at Actis, now a member of the RIBA CPD Providers Network, will also have a chance to present at some of its 20 annual roadshows, once face-to-face activities resume. All RIBA approved CPDs must meet strict criteria, be educational, innovative and balanced, address relevant statutory issues and have a clear learning outcome. They are designed to provide solutions to design problems and are likely to address sustainability issues, correct product application and legislative information. Actis UK and Ireland technical director Thomas Wiedmer, himself an architect, said: “We are looking forward immensely to being able to help the wider architectural profession to understand the benefits of reflective insulation in helping address issues of thermal bridging. “The module looks at why the performance gap exists, evidence of its existence through research by bodies such as BBA and Glasgow Caledonian University, the effects of external factors on the fabric efficiency of a building, the impact of part L which places a good deal of emphasis on air tightness and the impact of thermal bridging and how reflective insulation can address it.” The nearly 200-year-old RIBA champions better buildings, communities and the environment and works with government to improve the design quality of public buildings, new homes and new communities. Register here to join the CPD on the second Thursday of every month at 1pm.

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Make a new project happen with a visionary idea

Jeremy Siegel of Bjarke Ingels Group urges us to seize the initiative and create transformative projects from scratch by harnessing community support. The coronavirus pandemic is, for many, prompting a re-evaluation of how and where we live and work. From the domestic level to city-wide, and from the regional to the national, built environment issues that were problematic before the pandemic are now all the more acute. It follows that both commercial clients and the public sector will increasingly require imaginative responses from architects. Practices that are proactive, agile and bold will be well placed to provide the imaginative responses that our fraught present day demands. At next month’s RIBA Guerrilla Tactics: Reinventing Practice, Jeremy Alain Siegel, an Associate at Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), will be explaining how his practice has employed the tools of design to win over funders, planners, communities and elected city officials alike with daring ideas. It has done so with a combination of boundless enthusiasm, lateral thinking and appealing communications: bound together in a great proposal that captures the imagination. What is all the more impressive is that some of its grandest proposals were not responses to tenders or competitions but were entirely self-generated: ideas prompted by a local problem which they took out into the world and made happen. “We are designers: we understand how different things come together,” Siegel points out. “This allows us to bring a certain amount of useful naivety, in that we can challenge presumptions about what can or cannot be done.” BIG’s most instructive project from this point of view is its reimagining of the iconic Brooklyn Queens Expressway as the half-mile long BQ-Park. The project’s beginnings were entirely self initiated, in a speculative fashion, by BIG’s local Brooklyn office. The scheme they drew up was so powerful a proposal that it gained momentum within the community and eventually convinced the Mayor to shelve the city’s original remedial scheme in favour of BIG’s vision. The City of New York was proposing to fix the ageing expressway structure dating from the 1950s, which was corroding and would eventually collapse, by building a temporary highway through the well-loved waterfront park above it. This was a project very local to BIG’s office. Siegel explains that they were convinced there must be a better solution. They started putting together some pro bono proposals over two or three weeks, then brought in some engineer and landscape friends and the project grew larger and more bold in scope. “The community group that had formed to fight the plan learned about us,” Siegel recounts. “They set up a meeting to discuss putting together a pro bono proposal: we were able to show them we already had 150 pages of one!” BIG’s proposal provided a platform for adding significant new parkland, and was eventually accepted by the City as both more feasible and less costly than the original reconstruction plan, while delivering far more benefits to the community. Siegel’s talk of being a “possibilist” and of a designer’s “naivety” is backed up by keen awareness of local politics and community interests. “You have to make your vision resilient politically by being broad, not just courting narrow interest groups,” he counsels. “Instead you have to identify multiple funding streams, multiple stakeholders and present ideas in ways that they, as stakeholders or funders, can see themselves involved.” While BQ-Park is, like many of BIG’s projects, a huge infrastructure scheme, there are lessons here for small practices. Siegel says these “guerrilla projects” are carried out by quite small teams. Architects should not underestimate the power of an audacious proposal to generate attention and cut through bureaucracy. “If you have given a community an appealing idea, they will be advocating for the project when you cannot. They can work for your proposal while you’re elsewhere. That is also why we make videos to articulate a project: a standalone thing that is out in the world, being shared and making an argument for your work.” Having the good idea is only half of the battle; the rest is communication. Siegel suggests architects might need to invest more thought on written and verbal communication when it comes to design, and not just believe they can “‘draw themselves out of a problem”. “We always try to explain things in terms people understand. If you want to connect with real people, you should be able to meet anyone and talk to them in a language they can understand.” The project presentations for BQ-Park and other schemes (viewable on the Bjarke Ingels website) are sterling examples of how to marry text and image, with pertinent leading questions placed in comic book style speech bubbles. “In presenting a vision, always bring it back to the anchoring point – the catalyst,” Siegel advises. “You don’t want to lose people.” Tickets are now available for Jeremy Siegel’s talk, The power of a BIG proposal, at the RIBA’s Guerrilla Tactics 2020 online conference. Learn more insights from other speakers at the conference in our recent features, Is design work moving to the countryside? and Five smart project management boosts. Thanks to Jeremy Alain Siegel, Associate, BIG. RIBA Core Curriculum: Business, clients and services. As part of the flexible RIBA CPD programme, Professional Features count as microlearning. See further information on the updated RIBA CPD Core Curriculum and on fulfilling your CPD requirements as an RIBA Chartered Member.

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Court beckons for all landlords with damp property, warns Safeguard

Since March, all tenants – whether in private or social accommodation – can now sue their landlords if their homes have health-damaging defects. This is thanks to the Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Bill 2017-2019, which came into force for new tenancies from 20 March 2019 and, from now, applies to existing, historic tenancies too. “Landlords have had 12 months to consider the implications of the act”, says Hudson Lambert, managing director of Safeguard Europe – the UK’s leading specialist in damp and waterproofing, and masonry repair solutions – “and they’re running out of time to improve these properties before the law starts to bite. Our advice to any that haven’t done so is to assess properties as soon as possible and make the necessary repairs or modifications. No one should be living in homes that are damaging to health.” The Act sets out a raft of issues which, if defective, could cause harm to tenants, including proper ventilation and freedom from damp. The presence of damp and poor ventilation can both promote mould growth, and the relationship between ill health, damp and mould and the negative impact on respiratory health are well established. The English Housing Survey 2018-2019 found that 7% of private rented dwellings and 5% of social housing had some sort of damp problem. In certain sectors, that figure appears to be much higher. Research by the National Union of Students published in February 2019 found that 35% of students were living in rented accommodation with damp and mould. Previously tenants with damp and mould problems could attempt to legally address them by pursuing a statutory nuisance notice with local authority environmental health officers. However, the response to council intervention from landlords has often been to begin eviction proceedings against the tenants, which deterred tenants from complaining. Under the new regime, tenants can sue landlords, not only to force them to fix health-damaging defects, but also for compensation. The courts will decide on the timeframe for any required works, and what the level of compensation will be. For landlords and their advisors seeking expert advice on damp, Safeguard offers a CPD seminar programme on the major causes and effective treatments.  The headline CPD, the RIBA-accredited Dealing with Dampness, is an overarching introduction to the problems of rising and penetrating damp that will give landlords, specifiers, builders and others enough information to help them tell the difference between the two and determine sources, while giving options on how to act to cure the problem. For details of Safeguard’s CPD programme, visithttps://www.safeguardeurope.com/training-courses/cpd-seminars

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RIBA Is Hosting Dulux Trade Debate

Dulux Trade has assembled a panel of leading industry experts to share their design insights and initiatives under the theme, ‘Future Proofing Design’ at RIBA London later this month. The event, on February 26, will incorporate a presentation revealing the insights underpinning the ColourFutures™ 2019 palettes – the annual AkzoNobel snapshot of global current affairs and emerging macro design trends, distilled into separate and distinct colour palettes to inspire specifiers. Joining the discussion at RIBA HQ in Portland Place will be Rosemary Jenssen from Jenssen Architecture Ltd representing the ProCure 22 Framework; Louise Tod, independent colourist; Ted Szuman, head of innovation at AkzoNobel; Jim Ashley-Down, managing director at Waldmann Lighting plus Flavie Lowres and Mindy Hadi, Associate Director and Head of Social Research at BRE. The panel will discuss themes around the topic of future proofing design and incorporate the exploration of initiatives that put the occupants at the heart of the design brief. The discussion will highlight how, in a world dominated by new technology, design professionals can cultivate positive connections, wellbeing and productivity in the built environment. Against a backdrop of increasing budget constraints, this event will explore ways in which designers can deliver greater value for their clients. Capturing the emerging movement to optimize building design through enhanced occupant outcomes, this forum will enable design professionals to understand the significance of introducing a biophilic design application into office spaces as part of the BRE’s ground breaking research initiative. This discussion will also explain how the panel are harnessing and acting on research regarding the benefits of an occupant-centric approach to colour and design. Marking this as the base foundation for all future interior design briefs, they will uncover under-deployed innovations in lighting, surface materials and smart coatings that support ambitions for more sustainable buildings that enable us all to be more productive and to thrive at every stage of life – whether in education, pursuing careers or using the healthcare system. Attendees will then be given the opportunity to take part in an open question and answer session. Places are extremely limited, but accredited specifiers, designers and architects can book their place by emailing futureproofingdesign@democracypr.com by 22nd February. Now in its 16th year, the Dulux Trade ColourFutures™ palettes are selected to help professionals make choices for a wide variety of buildings with more confidence, providing support on all steps from inspiration through visualisation, product choice and application. Central to this is the Dulux Colour of the Year 2019, Spiced Honey™, a neutral shade that struck a chord with the experts during the forecasting workshop. Honey is associated with nourishment and energy and the imagery of bees themselves perfectly captured the idea of a caring, thriving community. The event is at RIBA, Portland Place, London, on February 26 from 9am-11am.

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Viridian Solar Celebrates Role in RIBA House of the Year

Viridian Solar is celebrating the announcement of the RIBA Grand Designs House of the Year 2018. The stunning Lochside House in the Scottish Highlands that won the accolade features roof integrated solar panels from the UK manufacturer. The house was designed by Cambridge Architects, Haysom Ward Miller and with its remote rural setting, sustainability and energy efficiency were extremely important. The house has its own water supply, sewage treatment and an off-grid solar energy system installed by AES Solar. The external cladding is of burnt Scottish larch and is used as a roof covering as well as for the walls. Dry stone walling surrounds the house and the low-profile roof integrated solar panels complement the other high-quality materials and form a prominent part of the overall design. The RIBA judges were impressed by the sustainability and energy efficiency of the building, the choice of materials, and its integration into its wild setting. Ben Derbyshire, RIBA president, described it as ‘truly breath-taking’. “With a highly sustainable, off-grid approach to energy and water, it leaves the surrounding environment as undisturbed as possible. Every detail has been fine-tuned to create an exceptional home and studio that meets the needs and wishes of its artist owner. Lochside House is the perfect addition to this dream landscape.” Kevin McCloud, presenter of Grand Designs was also impressed: “This building has been tailored to its site. It’s been stitched and woven…seamed into the tapestry of this place and it is so much the better for it,” he said. “It’s the kind of architecture that we can all easily love, the kind of architecture we can all easily learn from; and it’s a way of building that we, in Britain, are getting really very good at.” Stuart Elmes, CEO of Viridian Solar said: “The Lochside House is a deserved winner and a great example of how solar can be brought into the heart of building design. “

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A Few Weeks Left for GAI Nominations

There are only a few weeks left for architects and specifiers to make their nominations for the internationally recognised biennial GAI/RIBA Architectural Ironmongery Specification Awards. Organised by the Guild of Architectural Ironmongers (GAI) in conjunction with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), the awards are designed to identify and reward excellence in the specification of architectural ironmongery. For the 2018/19 awards, projects can be nominated for a ‘Best new product: design and innovation’ category. This award has been created to showcase new ironmongery products, as well as the advancing technologies used within the door and window hardware industry. This category will celebrate products that have been created using new methods of manufacture, or that display new design concepts or originality of thought. This category is not limited to mechanical products. New innovations or technologies in access control, door automation or any field allied to architectural ironmongery could also be submitted. In addition to this new award, projects can be nominated for the following categories: residential; commercial and hospitality buildings; public health and education buildings, and international projects outside the UK and Ireland. Architects, specifiers, building contractors, clients and their architectural ironmongery advisers and suppliers across the world can nominate projects for the 2018/19 awards until Friday 16 November 2018. The projects or products must be either completed or released onto the market between 1 October 2016 and 30 September 2018 to be eligible for entry.    “The Specification Awards are unique because they reward the whole specification team. The outstanding design and high quality finishes of the projects nominated highlights the importance of the professional partnership between architects and architectural ironmongers,” said David Stacey, president of the GAI. “We hope the addition of the ‘Best new product: design and innovation’ category will reveal some really interesting products with pioneering ways of using materials to create a new solution or a new design,” he added. For each category there will be a winner, second and third place. The judges will also decide on an overall ‘winner of winners’. At the 2017/18 Specification Awards, this accolade went to Kings Gate, a residential project by architectural ironmongers izé and architect Lynch Architects. A brochure featuring the 2017/18 winning projects can be downloaded from the GAI website. There is no limit on the number of entries to the 2018/19 awards. The first entry from GAI or RIBA members is free of charge.

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RIBA to Launch New Innovative Building Contracts

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is launching two new and innovative building contracts next month (November 5). Designed to be used in conjunction with RIBA’s Architect’s Appointment Agreements for Small Projects (domestic and concise forms), the new contracts are fully aligned with the RIBA Plan of Work 2013. The new contracts have been designed in response to feedback from members of RIBA members who have called for improvement and innovation within the building contracts that are currently available. The RIBA Domestic Building Contract offers a simple, comprehensive and legally appropriate contract solution for all types of non-commercial work, such as renovations, extensions, maintenance and new buildings. The contract is endorsed by the HomeOwners Alliance. The RIBA Concise Building Contract will provide a complete contract solution to cover small scale commercial building projects of a standard and straightforward nature. The new RIBA Building Contracts form part of a move towards a holistic suite of project contracts that can be prepared and stored digitally and are more relevant and focused around the needs of those undertaking smaller projects – a more intelligent and flexible suite of documents that are easier to use, yet reduce risks to both parties and the project overall. The RIBA is also working on updating the suite of RIBA Agreements, to be available as an online tool. Key innovations incorporated into the new RIBA Building Contracts: Allows effective collaboration between the client/employer and contractor Facilitates good management of the project from start to completion Fair and equitable terms for all parties Provides an effective way of managing payments to the contractor Flexible payment options Flexibility to propose suppliers and sub-contractors Provides a straightforward method for dealing with changes to the project within specified timescales Option for completion in stages Comprehensive insurance provisions Terms compliant with the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations for consumer clients

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RIBA Appoints Alan Vallance as New Chief Executive

Following a competitive recruitment process, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has appointed Alan Vallance as its new Chief Executive. Vallance has a financial background, along with consulting, general management and strategic planning in Europe and Australasia. He joined RIBA in September last year as Interim Director of Finance and Operations and since February has been interim Chief Executive of the organisation. Before he joined RIBA, Vallance spent three years as Chief Operating Officer at the Law Society, the membership and regulatory body for solicitors in England and Wales. Jane Duncan, RIBA President, said she was delighted that Vallance has been appointed as the new RIBA Chief Executive and that he has been selected from a strong and large field of applicants. Duncan continued: “The interview panel were unanimous in concluding that Alan is the right person to lead the RIBA as we deliver our 5 year strategy. “As Interim Chief Executive since February this year, Alan has demonstrated his energy, drive and commitment to strengthening the RIBA’s voice and impact as a global professional membership body driving excellence in architecture.” Meanwhile, Vallance explained: “Architects are creative, visionary and collaborative professionals who ensure that our built environment serves and strengthens communities now and in the future. It is a privilege to have been appointed to the role of Chief Executive of the RIBA. “I look forward to working with the Board and Council, the staff team and members in the UK and globally to deliver the RIBA’s five year strategic plan and to further strengthen the RIBA’s offer to current and future members.” Earlier in the month, RIBA London unwrapped its architect-designed window installations along Regent Street. Now in its seventh year, the RIBA Regent Street Windows project this year showcases work by 10 practices, including Bureau de Change, Knox Bhavan, Piercy & Co and Matheson Whiteley.

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RIBA Welcomes Nominations for Inspiring Teaching Award

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is welcoming nominations for the Annie Spink Award of inspiring teaching. The award recognises outstanding contributions to architectural education and is financed by the Annie Spink Trust Fund, passed on to the institute by architect Herbert Spink in 1974. The award honours the development of architectural education is a long-standing tribute to Herbert’s late wife Annie. Over the years, winner of the award have included Elia Zenghelis, Dalibor Vesely, Peter Salter, Wolf Prix, Isi Metzstein, Andre MacMillan, Dean Hawkes, David Greene, Peter Cook, Nigel Coates and Florian Beigel. The Annie Spink Award is presented once every two years and can be given to any individual or group who teach a RIBA recognised course in either UK or international schools. To be nominated, teachers must show that they have contributed substantially to architectural education for many years, be engaged in the process of learning and show an involvement in architectural education development. Nominations are to be submitted by Thursday 15 September 2016 at 5pm. The winner will be presented with the Annie Spink trophy by RIBA President Jane Duncan and will also secure the prize fund of £10,000 on December 6 2016 at a London ceremony. The judging panel will be chaired by RIBA’s Director of Education, Professor David Gloster and will also feature RIBA Vice President of Education, Alan Jones who is also Queen’s University Belfast’s Director of Education Architecture. Also on the panel are: Zeno Bogdanescu (Professor of Architecture at Romania’s Ion Mincu University of Architecture and Urbanism), Susannah Hagan (Professor of Architecture at University of Westminster), Basmah Kaki (Director and tutor of Saudi Arabia’s Architectural Association Visiting School Jeddah; RIBA Bronze Medallist 2011) and Alan Penn (Dean of the Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment (UCL); Professor in Architectural and Urban Computing).

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RIBA Joins Newly Launched Global Alliance for Urban Crises

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is now part of the freshly launched Global Alliance for Urban Crises. The Alliance was launched during the first ever World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in Istanbul and will bring together the Red Cross, Red Crescent, municipal government networks, UN agencies, urban professionals and the private sector. It is hoped that the culmination of all these organisations will form a joint platform for lobbying, action and advocacy in order to acknowledge the increasing importance of urban humanitarian assistance. The Alliance has also made several other major commitments, including an ‘Action Agenda’ which will deal with the complex nature of urban crisis management and response through innovation. The agenda will also empower municipal governments’ response capabilities through more predictable surge capacities of local governments and urban expertise, develop ways of effectively dealing with urban displacement and providing recommendations for sustainable financing instruments. The Alliance has also made a commitment to an Urban Crisis Charter which will see members work with each other to ensure urban societies, particularly the ones most at risk, to get ready for and deal with the effects of humanitarian crises faster. The RIBA is working in conjunction with the Institution of Structural Engineers and the Royal Town Planning Institute as part of its commitment. The aim of this will be to give the international humanitarian and development community a more practical conduit to the expertise of its member institutes. RIBA Vice President, Peter Oborn, said the RIBA is pleased to be part of the crucial new global framework for urban response, recovery and preparedness and that the organisation is looking forward to providing their expert knowledge. Oborn added that RIBA and its core support of 40,000 members will bring expertise to the alliance, in particular due to the fact that there is an increasing urban dimension to humanitarian crises.  

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