BDC

Search
BDC Magazine

RIBA

RIBA announces CPD changes

RIBA announces CPD changes

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced changes to continuing professional development (CPD) for its chartered members. 1 January 2024 will see the introduction of simplified rules – removing the need for members to assign points or learning levels to their CPD activities – and more robust compliance.

Read More »
Architect at Local Practice Appointed as RIBA Gloucestershire Chair

Architect at Local Practice Appointed as RIBA Gloucestershire Chair

A new Chair has been appointed for RIBA Gloucestershire: Josh Maddison, Architect at GSSArchitecture, was elected earlier this year and started his term on 1st July. Speaking of his recent appointment, Josh said, “It’s a great privilege to have been voted as Chair of the RIBA Gloucestershire. Having grown up

Read More »
RIBA and CIOB publish guide to help manage high-risk elements of buildings

RIBA and CIOB publish guide to help manage high-risk elements of buildings

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) have jointly published a free guide to managing Safety-Critical Elements (SCEs) in building construction, for their members and the wider built environment sector.  The Guide to Managing Safety-Critical Elements in Building Construction helps to identify high-risk elements in and around buildings. It outlines systems

Read More »

NBS & RIBA LAUNCH SURVEY TO MAP THE FUTURE OF RIBA-APPROVED CPD

Latest research survey calls for architect feedback to improve educational offering A new survey has been launched by NBS, a leading specification and product information platform for the construction industry, and RIBA (The Royal Institute of British Architects) to find out how architects and specifiers are using RIBA-approved CPDs (Continuing

Read More »

A ROBUST APPROACH TO INDUSTRIAL PROTECTION SYSTEM SPECIFICATION

Architects are increasingly specifying industrial protection equipment for warehouses and distribution centres. Paul Roehricht of Brandsafe provides guidance on best practice. Distribution and logistics are dynamic sectors that’s forecast to be worth over $325 billion by the end of 2024. In the UK alone, one leading commercial property group* reports

Read More »

RIBA approval sees record numbers book Actis online CPD

Record numbers of people have been booking places on a CPD created by insulation specialist Actis since it became a RIBA-approved training course at the end of 2020. The much-praised and already very popular session on Addressing the performance gap with reflective insulation looks at how to combat thermal bridging

Read More »

Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

RIBA

RIBA announces CPD changes

RIBA announces CPD changes

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced changes to continuing professional development (CPD) for its chartered members. 1 January 2024 will see the introduction of simplified rules – removing the need for members to assign points or learning levels to their CPD activities – and more robust compliance. While members are already required to undertake and record CPD, RIBA will now check that every member has an up-to date online record, rather than auditing a random sample. Alongside the new rules, exemptions will be introduced – on request – for members on maternity, paternity, carer or adoption leave, or away from practice due to long term illness. The changes, which coincide with updates to ARB’s CPD requirements, are aimed at ensuring and demonstrating that RIBA members meet the highest professional standards and are equipped with expertise in crucial areas such as building and fire safety, climate literacy, legal and regulatory compliance, and inclusive design. RIBA has published information and guidance for members, available via its website. Executive Director for Professional Knowledge at RIBA, Adrian Dobson, said: “RIBA chartered membership represents a gold standard in architectural practice, and today the expectations and demands on architects have never been greater. Societal issues, such as the Grenfell Tower tragedy and the climate crisis, have led to significant shifts in the wider industry, requiring architects to demonstrate competence across a broad range of areas. The forthcoming changes to RIBA’s CPD requirements will it make easier than ever before for our members to develop and maintain the sophisticated knowledge and expertise they need. This will ultimately ensure that we uphold the highest standards in architecture, and that the profession remains commercially resilient and at the forefront of addressing society’s most pressing issues. Our focus remains better and safer buildings and places, stronger communities, and a sustainable built environment. We are here to support our members with the changes and advise them on their CPD needs. Alongside resources which are free for members – including digital content, events and articles – we offer structured and informal CPD at every level and price.” Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

Read More »
New guidelines put accessibility and inclusion at the heart of building design

New guidelines put accessibility and inclusion at the heart of building design

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has today published new guidance to ensure that inclusion and accessibility are considered at every stage of the design and construction process. The result of a multidisciplinary collaboration – including input from people with lived experience and experts from 25 built environment professions – the Inclusive Design Overlay to the RIBA Plan of Work is an important step towards RIBA’s commitment to making the built environment accessible and welcoming for everyone. The guidance has been developed with the specialist inclusive design consultancy Motionspot, and with the support of Heathrow and Jane Simpson Access. Intended to be widely understood and used by anyone involved in the built environment sector, it assigns clear responsibilities and tasks to the different roles involved in a building project – including client, project management, design, construction, and asset management teams. What is inclusive design? Inclusive Design Overlay Project Lead and Lead Overlay Author, Pareisse Wilson,who is also Inclusive Design Strategy Lead at Motionspot, said: “The biggest positive for me regarding this project is the fact it has been created in collaboration with industry, from landscape architects and engineers to project and facilities mangers. Together these collaborators helped decide which roles to include and contributed to defining the inclusive design tasks they would undertake at each Work Stage. Throughout the journey over 100 built environment professionals have attended workshops or provided feedback on draft versions of the Overlay. This makes the Inclusive Design Overlay a truly inclusively designed framework.” Steering Group member and Motionspot CEO and Founder Ed Warner said: “By empowering built environment professionals to create and operate more inclusive and equitable buildings and spaces, the Inclusive Design Overlay will enable previously marginalised groups to access and feel welcome in all areas of the built environment. I am confident this guidance will inspire positive change, helping to improve inclusive design across the UK and inspiring action around the world.” RIBA President Simon Allford said: “RIBA serves our members and society to deliver better buildings and places, stronger communities, and a sustainable environment – and inclusion is at the heart of this. The Inclusive Design Overlay will help not only our members but other design professionals to support wider communities, placemaking, and buildings, by designing for everyone.” RIBA Director of Practice and Individual Knowledge Alex Tait said: “Our industry needs a more rigorous and collaborative approach to inclusion throughout the full lifecycle of our projects and assets. This Overlay aims to embed an inclusive design framework within the RIBA Plan of Work. We are grateful to our project partners and industry colleagues for their commitment to deliver this.”   Steering Group member and Heathrow Project Manager Jenny McLaughlin said: “Heathrow’s vision is to be ‘Open for All’. However, we can only achieve this with the right tools and commitment from the design and construction industry. The Inclusive Design Overlay is a massive step in the right direction as it allows us to work towards our goals of becoming systematically inclusive, equitably safe, and meeting our UN Sustainable Development Goals to leave no one behind.” Download the Inclusive Design Overlay to the RIBA Plan of Work https://www.architecture.com/knowledge-and-resources/resources-landing-page/inclusive-design-overlay-to-riba-plan-of-work. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

Read More »
Architect at Local Practice Appointed as RIBA Gloucestershire Chair

Architect at Local Practice Appointed as RIBA Gloucestershire Chair

A new Chair has been appointed for RIBA Gloucestershire: Josh Maddison, Architect at GSSArchitecture, was elected earlier this year and started his term on 1st July. Speaking of his recent appointment, Josh said, “It’s a great privilege to have been voted as Chair of the RIBA Gloucestershire. Having grown up in the county, I hope to use to use the platform to continue the development and engagement of the local RIBA community, to create stronger links with the emerging student body and promote Gloucestershire based architecture.” Based at the GSSArchitecture Gloucester Quays office with over five years’ experience, Josh is in good stead to collaborate with local clients and stakeholders to support the members of RIBA Gloucestershire. His recent projects include the multi-million-pound St Thomas Street student accommodation in Bristol, as well as the refurbishment of the Endoscopy Department at Cheltenham General Hospital. Tom Lyons, Senior Partner at GSSArchitecture, commented, “A huge congratulations to Josh for his new appointment as RIBA Gloucestershire Chair. We are extremely fortunate to have Josh at GSS and we are looking forward to seeing how he uses his new position to bring about positive change in the area.” Elsewhere, Josh is a keen cyclist and completes tough challenges such as Hills for Hope: a 270-mile bike ride in 24 hours to help raise money for multiple charities including Cancer Research UK, Samaritans, and SARA. To find out more about GSSArchitecture, and to view their extensive range of projects in a variety of sectors, please visit www.gssarchitecture.com Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

Read More »
RIBA and CIOB publish guide to help manage high-risk elements of buildings

RIBA and CIOB publish guide to help manage high-risk elements of buildings

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) have jointly published a free guide to managing Safety-Critical Elements (SCEs) in building construction, for their members and the wider built environment sector.  The Guide to Managing Safety-Critical Elements in Building Construction helps to identify high-risk elements in and around buildings. It outlines systems that should be adopted to ensure that SCEs are properly incorporated and will serve as an important tool to ensure good practice and deliver safe, high-quality buildings.  The joint guide recognises the cross-industry need for a rigorous and structured approach to the design, construction and inspection of safety-critical building elements.   The guide highlights elements that, if omitted or installed incorrectly, can pose significant risk to people in and around buildings, including:  CIOB past President Paul Nash, who chaired the Safety-Critical Elements working group, said:   “At its heart, this guide is about ensuring that the buildings we create are safe for those who use them. That means ensuring every element that goes into a building is designed and installed correctly and this is independently verified before a building is occupied. The guide is another step towards creating a safer built environment.”  Former President of the Royal Society of Ulster Architects (RSUA) and current member of RIBA’s Expert Advisory Group on Fire Safety Professor John Cole CBE said:   “This guide is a spur to the industry. We have seen much evidence showing how poorly Safety-Critical Elements have been installed in too many buildings. We all have to stand up, be serious and take appropriate responsibility. We want to push the industry to ensure that, on every project, all SCEs that could potentially impact the safety of future building users are properly designed, installed and inspected, with supporting evidence of compliance.”  Download the Guide to Managing Safety-Critical Elements in Building Construction. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

Read More »

RIBA REPORT SHOWS JCT IS DOMINANT CONTRACT PROVIDER AND “INDUSTRY STANDARD”

The RIBA Construction Contracts and Law Report 2022 has been published, with the results showing that JCT continues to be the most widely used standard form contract provider in the UK construction industry. 59% of respondents indicated that JCT contracts were the forms that their organisation used most often, whilst 71% said that they had used a JCT contract over the last 12 months. When asked to give reasons for their choice of contract, respondents said of JCT: “industry standard and tested in the courts”, “fair, equitable and well understood”, “standard lump sum contract understood by the industry” and “simple and familiar”. The use of JCT contracts was particularly dominant in the sector of project value between £250,000 and £5m. The report also showed that the overall level of reported disputes within the industry was continuing to fall – from 44% in 2015, to 33% in 2018, to 27% this year. The importance of sustainability and collaboration were key themes. 43% of respondents were involved in one or more contracts that included ‘expected sustainable outcomes’ and 32% that included ‘measurable sustainability criteria’. 23% said that ‘operational performance criteria’ had become a contractual requirement, while 21% referenced ‘embodied carbon criteria’. Regarding collaboration, 57% of respondents said they adopted collaboration techniques on some or all projects, with almost a quarter adopting collaboration techniques on all projects. 63% said that collaboration techniques reduced the number of disputes, and 61% said they improved the delivery of the client’s objectives. JCT was the one of the first standard form contract authoring bodies to produce specific clauses relating to sustainability and collaborative working within its contract suite and in its guidance note, Building a Sustainable Future Together. The RIBA Contracts and Law Report 2022 survey was completed by over 950 clients, contractors and consultants throughout January and April 2022. It focused on projects over the previous 12 months. The report can be read and downloaded at https://www.architecture.com/knowledge-and-resources/knowledge-landing-page/riba-construction-contracts-and-law-report-2022.

Read More »

NBS & RIBA LAUNCH SURVEY TO MAP THE FUTURE OF RIBA-APPROVED CPD

Latest research survey calls for architect feedback to improve educational offering A new survey has been launched by NBS, a leading specification and product information platform for the construction industry, and RIBA (The Royal Institute of British Architects) to find out how architects and specifiers are using RIBA-approved CPDs (Continuing Professional Development). The RIBA CPD Providers Network survey will help monitor satisfaction levels as a springboard for improvement, delivering a deep dive into the most popular topics covered and ways to increase programme effectiveness in the digital era. Each year, RIBA Chartered Members are required to achieve 35 hours’ worth of CPD, as part of their continual development. Through CPD delivered by experts from manufacturers and advisory bodies, accredited by the RIBA CPD Providers Network, architects are able to stay up to date on industry changes to deliver the highest quality services to clients. Through the survey, NBS and RIBA aim to pinpoint how CPD is evolving and how new formats can quickly disseminate pertinent information about major changes in the industry whilst meeting the needs of a faster-paced, more technologically savvy workforce. NBS is now calling on architects and specifiers to offer their opinions to inform this year’s report and help identify some of the barriers to success, to ultimately improve the future success of RIBA-approved CPDs. David Bain, Research Manager at NBS, said: “It’s been five years since our last RIBA CPD Research Report and the industry has changed significantly in that time. In a sector that’s undergone such a dramatic transformation, particularly with the swift turn to digital adoption, we want to find out what’s important to specifiers and architects so we can enhance their learning potential in the years to come and propel new recruits to close the skills gap. “Specifically, we’ll be drilling down into the preferred ways of doing CPD and whether or not that has changed since the pandemic. We’ll also look at what format and content are most beneficial to them and the importance of RIBA accreditation when it comes to reviewed and approved content.” Once the results have been collated, the findings will be produced into a 2022 report due out in May this year. Those that choose to take part will then receive an early copy of the report, ahead of general release. Joni Tyler, RIBA Head of CPD, said: “RIBA-approved Providers Network CPDs have set the blueprint when it comes to quality – providing a distinct advantage over non-approved CPD materials. “We’ve seen a huge shift to digital CPDs over the past 18 months and with so much development in the industry we want to ensure that architects are getting exactly what they need. “This will also be a hugely useful exercise for companies looking to present or host CPDs, gaining a deeper understanding of how to effectively communicate with their architect and specifier audiences – what drives them and what makes them tick. Architects and other specifiers interested in taking part in the survey can do so by clicking here. The survey will take about 10 minutes to complete and respondents will receive a copy of the report automatically once published. For every completed response, NBS will donate £1 to the UK construction industry charity CRASH.

Read More »

A ROBUST APPROACH TO INDUSTRIAL PROTECTION SYSTEM SPECIFICATION

Architects are increasingly specifying industrial protection equipment for warehouses and distribution centres. Paul Roehricht of Brandsafe provides guidance on best practice. Distribution and logistics are dynamic sectors that’s forecast to be worth over $325 billion by the end of 2024. In the UK alone, one leading commercial property group* reports that investment in UK industrial and logistics totalled a record £6bn in H1 2021, more than double the £2.7bn recorded in the same period of 2020 and up 54% on the previous record period in 2018. It also forecasts that the UK will require an extra 92 million sq. ft. of warehousing space over the next three years. The demand for online grocery sales alone will account for 7.1 million sq. ft. of this additional space. So, what does all this demand mean for warehouses now and in the future? One thing for certain is that continuing best practice around health and safety in industrial environments that are becoming ever busier will be crucial. People and property need to be protected and architects and others responsible for these designs, need to understand how they can facilitate better, safer and more effective workplaces for their clients. Under UK law, employers must observe a duty of care to their workforce: they must identify the risks each person faces at work and plan accordingly. Specification A key part of best practice involving specification for new warehouses, or even improving or expanding existing ones, centres around the efficiency and sustainability of the property – clients are ultimately looking for a premises that runs as safely and efficiently as possible. The Health and Safety Executive’s HSG76 advises on a number of areas that need to be taken into account when planning the layout of a site so that ‘…pedestrians and vehicles can circulate safely. Where vehicles and pedestrians use the same traffic route, there should be adequate separation between them’. This involves the installation of clear signage and floor markings, which are crucial to the safe and efficient movement of people, vehicles and machinery around the industrial workspace.HSG76 also recommends combining this clearly discernible signage with guardrails and pedestrian handrails used to create clear segregation and traffic routes. Racking and storage is another area where incremental gains in safety can be achieved in a relatively straightforward and cost-effective manner. The application of clip-on protection to rack ends and any sharp edges of units will for example, protect people, vehicles and the units themselves from impact and collision damage. Careful consideration should also be given to choosing the right products supplier. First and foremost, it is critical that they must offer products appropriate for the project. This might seem somewhat obvious, but it is not uncommon for some safety products to look good on paper only to lack the necessary performance characteristics that make them suitable for the required application. Here, opt for products whose performance has been assessed and verified through independent testing – this will always be a good starting point and a clear indicative of suitability. A good supplier should be able to advise an architect on the performance requirements for each system on a project-by-project basis, which will allow you to tailor your designs to the exact needs of the end user. This is where it benefits to partner with a supplier which has an in-house surveying and design team; they can directly support you and make it easier to create bespoke solutions for each project. Requisite expertise Looking further down the project timeline, it will make life easier for the appointed main contractor if your safety system supplier is able to deploy its own installation teams. They will be best placed to assist on-site, helping to make sure that the project is completed within the desired timescales and budget. They will also have the requisite technical knowledge to deal with any issues on-site during the installation process, adding further to fast turnaround times and efficiencies. It’s important to bear in mind that the end client is duty-bound by Regulation 3 of The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999) to ‘…make a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to the health and safety of their employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work’. An experienced supplier will be well positioned to offer advice and insight when it comes to producing a comprehensive risk assessment for the project site in question. It is also worth considering the strategic partnerships of the supplier when the relevant products are required for your project. Ultimately, architects and specifiers will want to work with fast and responsive suppliers; organisations that can guide and advise based on project requirements through a consultative approach. Health and safety is a critical component of any modern, well-managed warehouse or logistics operation and there is always room for improvement when it comes to safeguarding and protecting people, and mitigating risk.  In short, specification of effective safety solutions is simply good business. A RIBA-approved CPD seminar for architects on industrial safety solutions is available from Brandsafe. Details at www.brandsafeprotection.com * https://www.savills.co.uk/research_articles/229130/315446-0

Read More »

Vital Energi achieve project success through full RIBA design offering

The design stage is crucial for a successful construction project, and Vital Energi are delighted to offer a complete design process across all RIBA stages to help organisations achieve their energy ambitions. By influencing key decisions made early on in the design process, the team at Vital ensure buildings are designed in an optimum way by working alongside M&E consultants, sustainability consultants, structural engineers, and architects, to ensure clients benefit from design efficiency from the beginning. Vital have recently been working with one of the UK’s largest developers, Taylor Wimpey, on their Hepscott Road project in Hackney Wick, which comprises 145 apartments and 23,820 sq. ft of commercial space. Early involvement in the project from RIBA Stage 2 has allowed Vital to work with the architects at the pre-planning stage, influencing key decisions and providing optimal support to Taylor Wimpey. Spatial provisions, such as the location of HIUs and utility cupboards, rooftop plant areas, riser sizes, ceiling void depths, and energy centre plant areas have been determined. These key considerations provide the architect with valuable information to ensure the building works get the best out of the heat network. Amanda Daly, Senior Technical Manager for Taylor Wimpey London, said: “The introduction of Vital Energi at concept stage has been invaluable. Design input has been consistent, and the Vital team have fully integrated with the design team to make the process efficient and successful.” Elliott Sharpe, Vital Energi’s Design Director, said: “It’s great to be able to share the company’s experience from design, installation and operation of heat networks with the project design team and clients at such an early stage of a development. Not only does the professional team benefit, but so does the end customer through the creation of an efficient, low carbon heat supply.” With over 30 years’ heat network experience, Vital Energi’s design team specialise in creating robust and creative energy generation, distribution and conservation solutions of all sizes for small to large scale projects across all sectors, and are proud to have developed schemes for over 83,000 properties and installed upward of 30,000 HIUs. The Vital team can share their knowledge at any stage of the design process, however by RIBA Stage 4, many of the key decisions have already been made, some of which may be irreversible, such as defining the energy strategy, size and location of the energy centre, number and size of risers required, and the optimum district heating route. If the initial concept needs reworking, this can cause project delays, redesign work and additional cost. Having a heat network specialist on board from the early stages also integrates Vital’s experience of installation, ESCo services, metering & billing, and operation & maintenance into the design from day one. If you’re based in the South and would like to see your energy ambitions become reality, please contact Elliott Sharpe on Elliott.Sharpe@vitalenergi.co.uk.

Read More »

All Together Now: the definitive design guide for co-living and co-working spaces from the RIBA

Shared spaces have the power to transform homes and workplaces in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic. With property prices rising and chronic loneliness affecting people of all ages, the demand for collective living was already growing. Throw social distancing and remote working into the mix, and it’s no surprise that the need for physical togetherness has become more urgent than ever. As the definitions of ‘home’ and ‘workplace’ become increasingly blurred, there is unprecedented demand for spaces where people can come together to share experiences and resources. All Together Now is the first book to address the challenges and opportunities of designing co-living and co-working spaces for modern living. Written by experts in the field of shared live and work space, interior designer Naomi Cleaver and design journalist Amy Frearson, this wide-ranging book showcases a multitude of ways in which architects, designers and developers can create stylish, healthy and efficient ‘co-spaces’. Amy Frearson said: “Co-living and co-working offer very real solutions to many of the problems we face today, both as individuals and as a society. Sharing doesn’t have to mean compromise; it can help us live more efficiently, healthily and sustainably, without limiting our choices and comforts.” Naomi Cleaver said: “The pandemic has intensified questions about how we live and work together, and how we use resources. It has given us the chance to think hard about the society and environments we need if we are to thrive as individuals throughout our lives.” Working as a practical and inspirational guide, this extremely timely book offers a diverse range of architecture and interior design solutions for collaborative spaces. It draws from Naomi Cleaver’s own experience in the industry, as well as an array of richly illustrated case studies from around the world. Including both new-builds and conversions, examples range from a Dutch nursing home that doubles as a student residence, to a retreat for digital nomads in Bali. The book also features a foreword by award-winning architect Sadie Morgan OBE, founding director of architectural practice dRMM and chair of the Quality of Life Foundation, who herself grew up on a commune and still considers it her home. Sadie Morgan said: “Through their exhaustive research, Naomi and Amy have been able to interrogate some of the most pertinent aspects of communal design. Ideas of different degrees and different models of sharing; the question of independence and its complex relationship with solidarity; the longevity and power of intergenerational living. These are just some of the themes expertly illustrated throughout the book.” Author, Consultant and Presenter Michelle Ogundehin, said: “All Together Now explores our relationship with ownership and place. Certainly, a more flexible housing model than mortgage-based purchase or deposit-based rental is way overdue. Imagine instead a living and working community built around like-minded people, regardless of age, who value freedom, diversity and sustainability, alongside the ability to easily upgrade or downsize as need and means dictate. A model for the future built around IRL connections. A model for the future that recognises that sharing and community are at the heart of all good societies. This is the very timely message of this important book.” All Together Now is not just a book for architects and designers, but for anyone interested in exploring new models of living and working and learning how to make the most of them. This highly engaging read includes a best practice toolkit, offering practical advice to any designer working at any scale.

Read More »

RIBA approval sees record numbers book Actis online CPD

Record numbers of people have been booking places on a CPD created by insulation specialist Actis since it became a RIBA-approved training course at the end of 2020. The much-praised and already very popular session on Addressing the performance gap with reflective insulation looks at how to combat thermal bridging and achieve optimal energy efficiency. Attendance figures for the free online sessions in January and February have been at their highest level since the sessions went online when the pandemic first hit – up around 20% on 2020 levels. As well as being available directly via Actis to building control officers, architects, specifiers and builders, it is also promoted via RIBA’s website, and the Institute’s monthly newsletter. It is being offered to RIBA chartered architects, who, along with their non-RIBA affiliated counterparts, must complete 35 hours of CPD every year. RIBA approved CPDs are worth double the points of a standard CPD and are therefore much prized by members, with 76% of them choosing training which has been specifically approved by the professional body. All RIBA approved CPDs must meet strict criteria, be educational, innovative and balanced, address relevant statutory issues and have a clear learning outcome. They are designed to provide solutions to design problems and are likely to address sustainability issues, correct product application and legislative information. Actis national specification manager Dan Anson-Hart said: “The two sessions we’ve run since RIBA approved the module for its members have seen a very strong take up. The module looks at why the performance gap exists, the effects of external factors on the fabric efficiency of a building, the impact of thermal bridging and how reflective insulation can address it.” Register here to join the CPD on the second Thursday of every month at 1pm.

Read More »