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March 17, 2016

Brexit: 10 things the industry needs to watch for

1) Share price volatility: Contractor and housebuilder share prices are continuing to suffer. Balfour Beatty and Carillion shares have both fallen further today – Balfour shares are trading 13 per cent down on opening price this morning, while Carillion shares are trading almost 8 per cent down today – bigger

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RIBA announces 2016 Honorary Fellowships

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has today (Thursday 24 September) announced the 2016 RIBA Honorary Fellowships, which will be awarded to fourteen individuals (of whom two are in partnership) from a diverse spectrum of backgrounds, including the worlds of construction, media, education and the arts. RIBA Honorary Fellowships

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Plans for Crossrail Station at Ladbroke Grove to be Reassessed

Most recently, it has been announced that the previously announced (and refused) plans for the development of a Crossrail station at London’s Kensal Gasworks may yet see a resurgence in interest and feasibility. Of course, the news is well received in line with the growing concern of ensuring infrastructure to

Read More »

The Launch of Cromford Creative: Restoring the Mills

For the opening of the Cromford Creative managed workspace scheme, held at Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage site, circa 150 dignitaries and their extras attended to both inspect and celebrate the work undertaken on the scheme, effectively bringing the historic, Grade I building back into use for the public. The

Read More »

Criticism on the Government’s Approach to Solar Industry

Most recently, it has been highlighted that a number of very influential solar industry executives have pointed the figure at the government for the development of an “ideologically driven campaign” against their specific industry, citing this campaign to have played a pivotal role in its current state of crisis. The

Read More »

Shedmasters Highlights the Incredible Take-Up of UK Warehousing

Playing host to some 300 guests from areas all the way across those industries relative to the logistics and industrial sectors were in attendance at this year’s Shedmasters event, held in Cannes. Savills announced that, to date, the total amount of take-up reported of UK warehouse space reached a notable

Read More »

Infra, the New Video Game for Pinpointing Structural Weaknesses

It is increasingly the case that we can see technology being a driving factor across many construction-related industries, allowing for far more in-depth analysis, planning and design concepts. Yet, it is almost unheard of for real progress to be made in the construction industry through the application of video gaming

Read More »

World Water Day – Using Water Sustainably

For this year’s World Water Day, customers are to be encouraged to selected water saving products where possible. In accordance with this Bristan is urging installers to, in turn, urge their own customers to make the best choices for sustainable water usage where possible. Though by no means compulsory, it

Read More »

How To Prolong The Life Of Your Tool

Finding a tool that not only works well for you, but helps you to produce your best work is not an easy task. Every professional and DIY enthusiast has their favourite tool, and when it’s time to replace that piece of equipment, nothing seems to work quite as well. So

Read More »

Latest Issue

BDC 317 : Jun 2024

March 17, 2016

Brexit: 10 things the industry needs to watch for

1) Share price volatility: Contractor and housebuilder share prices are continuing to suffer. Balfour Beatty and Carillion shares have both fallen further today – Balfour shares are trading 13 per cent down on opening price this morning, while Carillion shares are trading almost 8 per cent down today – bigger falls than on Friday last week. 2) Sectors to be hardest: With wide-ranging consequences facing the construction industry following the vote to leave, Construction News assesses the sectors that could be most affected. 3) Construction costs: Fears over short-term cost increases hit the market, with contractors locked into lump-sum work expected to feel the most pressure. 4) Spotlight on major schemes: Projects across the commercial and infrastructure sectors are under scrutiny, with many people questioning whether they will go ahead as planned. 5) Procurement opportunity: A vote to leave the EU could present an opportunity for the UK to streamline its public procurement processes. 6) Network Rail ‘Digital Railway’ under threat: Speaking ahead of the vote, Network Rail’s chief executive Mark Carne said the vote raised concerns about his plans to fully digitise the rail network’s signalling system. 7) Calls on government for certainty: Industry bodies including Build UK, the FMB and CECA have called on the government to give assurances about its project pipeline. 8) Skills crisis looms: A high proportion of the construction industry is reliant on EU labour. Experts assess how this could affect the workforce and firms’ ability to deliver projects on time. 9) Investment risks: “Will people be prepared to invest when there is such uncertainty around the economy?” asks Severfield chief executive Ian Lawson. CN takes an in-depth look at how Brexit will impact the industry, including inward investment. 10) Political fallout: Prime minister David Cameron has said he will step down as leader, prompting a leadership race; the Labour Party is in turmoil, with a number of shadow cabinet ministers quitting over the weekend; and a second Scottish independence referendum is “highly likely”.     Source link

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Contenders shortlisted for prestigious RIBA Research Medal design competition

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has today (20 August) announced the shortlisted candidates for the competition to design the new RIBA Research Medal.  The shortlist for the RIBA Research Medal Design Competition is as follows: • Abigail Burt• Hugo Maciel• Mary Gregoriy• Nicola Moss and Simon Beeson• Kate Ive• Petra Gross The RIBA received a high number of submissions to the international competition with entries from architects, designers, sculptors and specialist medal-makers and jewellers. After anonymising each submission, a Judging Panel assessed each entrant based on a brief proposal and portfolio of previous work. The Judging Panel for both stages consists of: Stephen Hodder (RIBA President and Chairman of Hodder and Partners), Jane Duncan (RIBA President Elect), Philip Attwood (Keeper of Coins and Medals, British Museum; President of the International Art Medal Federation, FIDEM; President of the British Art Medal Society), Charles Hind (RIBA Chief Curator and H J Heinz Curator of Drawings), Flora Samuel (Chair of RIBA Research and Innovation Group), Ruth Morrow (Chair of RIBA Research Awards Panel), Juliet Leach (RIBA Brand and Marketing Manager) and Anne Dye (RIBA Head of Technical Research). After their initial submission, the shortlisted candidates will now produce further developed designs for the judging panel to consider in September. Shortlisted candidates will receive honoraria of £250, and the overall winner will receive a prize of £2,000. The Medal will be awarded to the overall winner of the President’s Awards for Research (out of the winners of each of the four categories, Masters, PhD, University-led, and Practice-led) at a special ceremony in December. All final shortlisted designs will be available on an online gallery after the winner has been determined. RIBA continues an established history of commissioning and awarding medals following RIBA past President and co-founder Thomas Leverton Donaldson’s long held interest in architectural medals. The RIBA has previously commissioned a number of medals designed by eminent sculptors and craftsmen including the late-nineteenth/early-twentieth century leader of the ‘New Sculpture’ movement, George Frampton, and Langford Jones. The Chair of the Judging Panel and RIBA President Stephen Hodder said: “The judges were delighted with the response to this exciting competition to design a new Medal for the RIBA. We encourage the candidates to visit the RIBA, to understand particularly the rich research programmes run and supported by us, and to design a contemporary, forward-looking medal which reflects the continued growth of this important part of our activity.” – Ends – Notes to editors 1. For more information or interview requests, members of the press should contact: Gagandeep Bedi, Press Officer, RIBA: gagandeep.bedi@riba.org 020 7307 3814 2. The Awards champion high-quality research, raise the profile of architects and academics engaged in research and highlight the need for research across the profession to foster innovation and strategic thinking. 3. Academia queries about the award should be sent to email research@riba.org 4. Abigail Burt BAMS New Medalist, 2013. Talented young medallist who has completed a number of prestigious commissions including a commemorative medal for The British Museum, and who is currently in the process of completing a commission for The United Guilds Service of St Paul’s Cathedral. 5. Hugo Maciel Another young but highly accomplished medallist from Portugal, who has exhibited and lectured widely on the subject of medals and medal-making. Prominent commissions include Commemorative Medal of the International Year of Cooperatives and Commemorative Medal of the 500th Anniversary of the Birth of Amato Lusitano, Edition INCM – Portuguese Mint, Lisbon, Portugal, Commemorative Medal Bishop D. Gilberto, Edition GRAVARTE, Lisbon, Portugal, Commemorative Medal of the National Prize of Journalism University – PNJU, Lisbon, Portugal. 6. Mary Gregoriy Artist and educator, who has recently produced coins commemorating eminent literary figures, W B Yeats and James Joyce as well as the Rock of Cashel and more abstract representations, for instance the theme of Irish influence on Celtic Culture in Europe, all for the Central Bank of Ireland. 7. Nicola Moss and Simon Beeson Nicola Moss is an established medal maker, whose work includes medals for the British Art Medal Society (George and the Dragon 1986, Mamoo 2008), St. Dunstan Millennium Medal (The Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, 1988), Turtle Island Medal (Special Award, College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture University of Minnesota, 1991 – cast bronze on ribbon, with box), and the Ondaatje Prize for Portraiture, (The Royal Society of Portrait Painters, 1996). Her work is found in collections internationally, including Department of Coins and Medals, British Museum, V&A, The National Museum of Scotland, Smithsonian Institute (Washington DC, USA) and Munzkainett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Simon Beeson Simon Beeson is an architect, educator, public artist and sculptor. His medallic work includes Linlithgow Threshold (2002) commissioned the British Art Medal Society. He has created collaborative medallic works with Nicola Moss, notably Ice Fishing (1993) and Grain Elevator (1995). In 1997 he designed the Simmons Gallery for coins and medals in Lambs Conduit Street, London. Recent plaster reliefs and sculptures were exhibited as part of Building Walden, ArtSway 2014. 8. Kate Ive Kate Ive is a medal maker and sculptor working from her studio at the Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop (ESW). In 2011, she was selected as the British Art Medal Society’s ‘BAMS’ New Medallist 2011-12.’ Her work is found in a range of eminent public and private collections including the British Museum, Royal Mint Museum, American Numismatic Society in New York and the University Museum of Bergen, Norway. 9. Petra Gross Petra Gross also won the BAMS student Medal award while studying Fine Art Sculpture at Falmouth, andfurther researched medals at the British Museum, the Royal Mint, and in Bulgaria with Bogomil Nikolov. 10. The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture and our members www.architecture.com 11. Follow us on Twitter for regular RIBA updates www.twitter.com/RIBA Posted on Thursday 20th August 2015 Source link

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RIBA announces 2016 Honorary Fellowships

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has today (Thursday 24 September) announced the 2016 RIBA Honorary Fellowships, which will be awarded to fourteen individuals (of whom two are in partnership) from a diverse spectrum of backgrounds, including the worlds of construction, media, education and the arts. RIBA Honorary Fellowships are awarded annually to people who have made a particular contribution to architecture in its broadest sense. This includes its promotion, administration and outreach; and its role in building more sustainable communities and in the education of future generations. The 2016 RIBA Honorary Fellowships will be awarded to:• John Brooks – Vice Chancellor, Manchester Metropolitan University• Caroline Cole – architectural consultant• Dame Vivien Duffield DBE – philanthropist and client• Kristin Feireiss – architecture curator, writer and editor• Kate Goodwin – Head of Architecture and Drue Heinz Curator, Royal Academy• Charles Knevitt – journalist, author and former Director of the RIBA Trust• Peter and Annaliese Latz – landscape architects, Germany• Sasha Lubetkin – curator• Alison Nimmo CBE, FRICS, MRTPI, FICE – Chief Executive, The Crown Estate• Grayson Perry – artist• Richard Steer – quantity surveyor and patron of architecture, Gleeds• Martha Thorne – Executive Director of the Pritzker Prize, Planner and Urbanist • Heinz Wirz – publisher The lifetime honour allows recipients to use the initials Hon FRIBA after their name. The 2016 RIBA Honorary Fellowships will be presented at a special event at the RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London, W1 on 1 February 2016. ENDS Notes to editors: 1. For further press information contact Callum Reilly in the RIBA Press Office: callum.reilly@riba.org 020 7307 3757 2. Honorary Fellowships are awarded by the RIBA each year to individuals who have made an outstanding contribution to the quality of architecture, the achievements of the profession and the aims and objectives of the RIBA. Any person who is not an architect may be nominated by RIBA members and elected as an Honorary Fellow. 3. The 2015 RIBA Honours Committee who selected the 2016 Fellows was chaired by RIBA President Jane Duncan with Sir Peter Cook, Neil Gillespie OBE, Victoria Thornton OBE and the 2015 Royal Gold Medallist John Tuomey. 4. The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture and our members. Visit www.architecture.com and follow us on Twitter. 5. RIBA Honorary Fellows 2016 citations: JOHN BROOKS, Vice Chancellor, Manchester Metropolitan University – nominated by Peter Clegg It is unique, and surely will remain so, for a client to be shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize, named RIBA Client of the Year and to be elected an Honorary Fellow of the RIBA (not to mention having a building named after you) – all in the space of two years. But then John Brooks is a unique client. During his decade as Vice Chancellor of Manchester Metropolitan University (an unusually long tenure) John, a physicist by trade, has seen the reputation of MMU, at home and abroad, grow extremely rapidly. And he has taken an unusually hands-on approach to the commissioning of the architecture needed to accommodate and to exploit that growth and success. But Brooks is more entrepreneurial than many professors: his work for his DSc in the physics of materials resulted in three patents that enabled him to set up a joint-venture company. He has led a £350 million investment programme in new facilities as the University undergoes the largest physical change to its estate since its foundation and consolidates from seven to two campuses. He has appointed Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, as well Sheppard Robson, John McAslan and BDP as his architects, all of whom have produced some of their best buildings, many of them award-winning. But John has also championed the energy aspects of the higher education sector and has taken his university to the top of the university green league. And he has cut a figure in Manchester, fighting for high-quality public realm and architectural design. John is the client for the RIBA National Award-winning Manchester Business School (2013) and of the RIBA Stirling Prize shortlisted Manchester School of Art (2014). He was the personification of the award of the RIBA Client of the Year 2014 to Manchester Metropolitan University, when the citation included the tribute: ‘In the rapidly changing world that the higher education sector faces today: the introduction of fees and rapidly changing student numbers, the client at Manchester Metropolitan University was pivotal to delivering pioneering and inspiring new buildings for their estate.’ CAROLINE COLE, architectural consultant – nominated by Stephen Hodder Caroline Cole has worked tirelessly for architecture throughout her career. After studying architecture at Cambridge, she worked as a designer at Conran Associates and Crighton Ltd before becoming one of the UK’s first Design Managers, working client-side with Olympia and York at Canary Wharf. She then moved to the RIBA to run its Clients’ Advisory Service and Competitions Office, doubling the turnover of each and establishing Client Forums across a number of different sectors, to create a unique opportunity for clients to explore and develop an understanding of the real value of great architecture. Her hugely important work shaped future architect-client relationships. She now runs Colander Associates, a consultancy business working across the built environment that bridges the divide between clients and their consultants. She works with architects, landscape architects, engineers and designers to help them develop and run effective creative businesses; and with clients to identify the best design teams for their projects. She has inspired many of the UK’s most successful architectural practices to develop their businesses, including a number of Stirling Prize winners, and has worked alongside some of the most influential developers and building owners, helping to formulate their approach to architecture. Through Colander, she pioneered the concept of benchmarking for the profession and, building on her commitment to integrated design, has set up Equilibrium Network a group of senior and influential inter-disciplinary women working across the built environment. She is a Trustee of the Ove Arup Foundation, Acting Chair of Building Futures,

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Plans for Crossrail Station at Ladbroke Grove to be Reassessed

Most recently, it has been announced that the previously announced (and refused) plans for the development of a Crossrail station at London’s Kensal Gasworks may yet see a resurgence in interest and feasibility. Of course, the news is well received in line with the growing concern of ensuring infrastructure to support the potential benefits of Crossrail within local communities. Though originally deemed not to be a a feasible plan for the site back in 2013, it has since been designed that proposals can indeed be re-looked at for the station to be developed, thus opening up the potential for improved commerce and economic prosperity along with the HS2 and Crossrail station, scheduled to open in 2026, at Old Oak. Perhaps nodding to the potential of the scheme, Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, has recently requested for additional feasibility studies to be undertaken in a bid to revitalising the project. Should the studies proceed as planned, they will include an examination into exactly how a brand new Crossrail station might affect the greater rail network, also including the effective integration with other long-term capacity enhancers which are already planned for the Great Western Mainline. Of course, the potential for benefits amongst the local community are high, with the North Kensington area presently sitting as amongst the most deprived locations along the Crossrail route, as well as playing host to the largest unemployment levels in London itself. As such, the Crossrail station development could see the addition of a further 3,500 homes, on top of the already estimated 1,500 which could be developed on the site. Nodding to how transformation and redevelopment of land has a track record for encouraging the development of new homes, and creation of new jobs,, Boris Johnson commented: “By looking again at the options for this station we firmly believe that it could have a similar impact, triggering a much-needed fillip for this part of the capital.”

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The Launch of Cromford Creative: Restoring the Mills

For the opening of the Cromford Creative managed workspace scheme, held at Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage site, circa 150 dignitaries and their extras attended to both inspect and celebrate the work undertaken on the scheme, effectively bringing the historic, Grade I building back into use for the public. The event effectively also signalled the official opening of a brand new gateway to the heritage site, with a new state of the art gateway information hub located on the building’s ground floor. Serving as the completion of a £6.7m project, guests were able to look over the incredible work done on the venue to restore it into a condition whereby it can then add value back to the community and find effective use. The project itself, however, was only possible through funds raised by the Arkwright Society, one of Cromford’s leading charities for the restoration of historic structures and their reuse. As of present, the structure now incorporates approximately 8,000 square feet of managed workspace in the upper floors of the formerly known as, “Building 17”. The space is then split into 17 different individual workspaces, varying in size and available in single or multi-let packages, or even as a whole floor should potential occupiers truly see the value of the venue. Of course, beyond the bare bricks and mortar, the venue also offers a great deal of connectivity into other associated facilities at the mills, which includes an offering of conferencing and meeting rooms, a café and even a restaurant. “Building 17 is one of the most important heritage assets on the whole of the Cromford Mills site and we are delighted that it has been restored to its former glory,” explained Sarah McLeod, the Arkwright Society’s Chief executive. And, as such, the completion of the building’s regeneration is seen as a great step forward in enabling a useful, sustainable future for the entire site at Cromford Mills.

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Criticism on the Government’s Approach to Solar Industry

Most recently, it has been highlighted that a number of very influential solar industry executives have pointed the figure at the government for the development of an “ideologically driven campaign” against their specific industry, citing this campaign to have played a pivotal role in its current state of crisis. The comments, quick to follow the withdrawal of a solar power company with Elon Musk, the billionaire inventor’s backing, from the UK – this being the fourth of such organisations to shut up shop over the past few weeks. As a result, the voices of executives representing solar power companies have become increasingly critical of the government’s role ahead of the planned consultation for a 87% cut to small-scale solar subsidy levels; a move which has not been received all too well as jobs have been cut industry-wide already. As such, the Solar Trade Association has made clear its warning that the new plans could actually lead to the loss of some 27,000 jobs, as well as actually increasing the average customer’s bills by £1 by 2019 – a figure which actually sits on top of the £9 cited to be added to customer energy bills by the solar industry. And of course, with nations such as Germany having been heralded as pioneering a clear way forward for the development of renewables and solar energy projects, it really is of no surprise that businesses have taken the recent news items so harshly. Some of those keen to present their thoughts on this key industry topic include professionals at Trina, the world’s most prominent manufacturer of solar panels, Lark Energy, and Howard Johns, the Solar Trade Association’s previous chairman, and also the founder of Southern Solar. One of the key areas focused upon includes the very way in which solar industries are referred to by the government, which some individuals feel may be taking people away from the benefits that can be seen in the industry. As such, Lark Energy’s Managing Director, Jonathan Selwyn commented: “When the government talks about nuclear and fracking [shale gas] it’s all about investment in energy security and jobs. When it takes about renewables – not just solar – it talks about the costs to hardworking British families.”

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Shedmasters Highlights the Incredible Take-Up of UK Warehousing

Playing host to some 300 guests from areas all the way across those industries relative to the logistics and industrial sectors were in attendance at this year’s Shedmasters event, held in Cannes. Savills announced that, to date, the total amount of take-up reported of UK warehouse space reached a notable high of some 5m square feet, not yet including the 1.9m square feet still under offer; these figured effective highlighting a colossal increase of 85% on the 2015 figure of 2.7m square feet. In fact, it has been estimated by Savills that the total take-up is expected to actually tip over the long-term Q1 average of 5.4m square feet, which could clock in at a value near to 7m square feet in total for the start of Q2. Playing as key drivers to these figures has proven to be the reported mega-shed deals, which incorporates the 1.2m square feet facility for The Range in Bistol, as well as the 1m square feet centre for distribution of Amazon’s in the Midlands. Highlighting the figures as a wonderful start to 2016, Savills’ National Head of Industrial and Logistics, Richard Sullivan nodded towards the potential for record-breaking levels of take-up for Q1, with occupier demands sustained at high levels . Much of the interest, of course, has come from manufacturers and retailers operating online, with businesses achieving great success in their dominance in the wider market. Richard Sullivan also went on concerns as to the present state of a sparsity of fit-for-purpose warehouse space presently on the market, yet added: “However with 39 speculative schemes currently in the pipeline, this will help to address the issue over the next 12 months.” Of course, with the growing success of certain organisations in the online retail sector, as well as that of key manufacturers, the demand for warehousing space is expected to only grow yet further, with the view of this then reaching a value of up to 160% for 2016. And with some 8.8m square feet of prospective development planned for release over the course of 2016, it is, at the very least hoped that the supply for quality warehousing space will be able to challenge levels of demand somewhat.

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Infra, the New Video Game for Pinpointing Structural Weaknesses

It is increasingly the case that we can see technology being a driving factor across many construction-related industries, allowing for far more in-depth analysis, planning and design concepts. Yet, it is almost unheard of for real progress to be made in the construction industry through the application of video gaming technology; yet that is exactly what we’re hearing at present, with Infra. Designed by Loiste Interactive, a Finnish organisation, the game, called Infra, looks to investigate structural problems found within abandoned factories, tunnels and buildings deemed to be unsafe. Described as an entirely atmospheric experience of first-person adventure, the game effectively deals with the challenges faced by deteriorating structures and infrastructure, presented in an entirely non-violent package. During the “adventure”, players are to take photographic evidence of weaknesses in structural assets, as well as challenged with the solving of environmental puzzles, all along a story-led journey which encircles a plot of deception and corruption; an effective combination of gameplay mechanics and features which will actually see benefits for the wider construction industry. Funding for the project came from the reputed Steam Greenlight community, which enabled the organisation to use a more effective platform for networking with potential investors and contributors. Of course, even with this in place, funding has proven to be a troubling notion for the project, and, as such, the company has made the move to divide the game into two different releases, with the first leg having hit the market at the start of the year. Commenting, a spokesperson for the company said: “By 2015, we had managed to raise some money from investors, but not enough to finish the entire game. This lead to us running a short-lived fundraising campaign.” And it was in direct response to this that the company made the move to divide the game. Of course, with the first instalment on the market, the prospective hopes of securing more funding, as well as those of reigning in revenues to justify the second release will likely increase in line.

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World Water Day – Using Water Sustainably

For this year’s World Water Day, customers are to be encouraged to selected water saving products where possible. In accordance with this Bristan is urging installers to, in turn, urge their own customers to make the best choices for sustainable water usage where possible. Though by no means compulsory, it is hoped for installers and customers alike to get on board with the notion and focus more wholly upon the amount of water we use, and consume on a daily basis. Situated on March 22nd, World Water Day is a United Nations initiative which dates all the way back to 1993, primarily to highlight the importance of sustainable water use and focusing the attention of customers on the world water crisis; a key part of this incorporating circa 783m people still yet unable to source safe drinking water. Of course, the day will also include other initiatives as part of World Water Day, such as a focus on water safety concerns across other continents, but, effectively Bristan would like to highlight the importance of each and every person making a difference where they can – effectively, locally, at home, through sustained individual water usage. As Bristan’s Marketing Manager, Hayley Holland comments: “As perhaps one of the least-considered natural resources, it is all too easy to turn on the tap and forget about the consequences.” In accordance with this, by no means a rule of thumb, but individuals have pinpointed a lack of consideration for the amount of water we use on a daily base, almost taking the supply of the vital resource for granted. And while many of the problems to do with water shortages are seen abroad, it is also there case that certain pockets of the UK are still reeling from one of the worst droughts they have experienced in the past decades; this, then highlighting the severe importance of making a difference locally, today.

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How To Prolong The Life Of Your Tool

Finding a tool that not only works well for you, but helps you to produce your best work is not an easy task. Every professional and DIY enthusiast has their favourite tool, and when it’s time to replace that piece of equipment, nothing seems to work quite as well. So if there is a chance that you can prolong the life of your tools, then you can put off that fateful day when you have to replace your favourite piece of equipment. Sharpening your tools is one known way to increase the lifespan of your tool and is a process that is quick and easy, once you have had a few tries. You may think that an expert is needed as there are always fears of doing it wrong your first time, but with the right information and equipment, sharpening your tools yourself could save you both time, money and tool replacement in the long-run. Why is it Important to Sharpen Your Tools? You probably already know that blunt tools make for much harder work and results in a lower quality finish – but this isn’t the only reason you should look to sharpen them. When using your tools, the action of grinding them against another material results in swarfs being transferred to your tool. For example, when you use a chisel, excess material from the surface you are chiselling sticks to your tool; making it look blunt and your life a lot harder. Removing the excess swarf when sharpening your tools makes for healthier tools and an easier DIY experience. Sharpening your Tools with Stones This may sound a bit caveman-esque but when it comes to sharpening your tools, stones can be used again and again to provide a cost-effective and productive way to extend the lifespan. If you are considering using sharpening stones then you will need to choose between oil, water and diamond stones. It’s important to choose the best stone to suit your needs; water stones tend to wear quickly so may not be suitable within certain industries. For more information on how to sharpen knives with these stones, please see this guide. This applies to both household, industrial and gardening tools and by using the correct stone you will get a sharp edge with minimum fuss. Sharpening your Tools with Sandpaper Using sandpaper is another option for sharpening your tools; it’s quick, it’s effective and it doesn’t break the bank. Sandpaper comes in a range of grits so you can choose the best material to meet your needs – it is also extremely accessible, with a range of options available on eBay. Clean Tools are Effective Tools Sharpening your tools without cleaning them can make things significantly more difficult for you as it means that your stones have to sift through layers of grime and rust before getting to your tool. This will mean continual and prolonged effort on your part instead of taking a few simple steps to clean them and make the whole process a lot easier. After you have finished the cleaning process it is important to use a good quality oil which will help prevent any rusting. Keeping well maintained tools means that you will be able to use them again and again, while regularly cleaning your tools with reduce the need to sharpen then so often. So fear not when taking your first steps to sharpening your tools. Perhaps begin with sandpaper as this is easy to source and is relatively cheap, before branching out into other sources once you begin to feel more confident. Editorial originally features on the Trend Direct UK blog.

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