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Ventilation System Reviews Urged Amidst MEES Compliance Concerns

Ventilation System Reviews Urged Amidst MEES Compliance Concerns

According to recent research, a significant portion of office buildings in the United Kingdom do not meet the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) legislation. David Millward, Group Product Manager at Elta Fans, urges building owners and facilities managers to conduct thorough reviews of ventilation systems to fill in any gaps

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Signify trusts AI for more sustainable cities

Signify trusts AI for more sustainable cities

By John Gorse, Public and Government Affairs Lead, Signify UKI Connected lighting can help AI make smart cities greener The world has become increasingly urbanised. The UN reports that since 2007 more than half the world’s population has been living in cities. That number is projected to rise to 60% by 2030.

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Colt International show why they are specialists in the design, manufacture, installation, and service of smoke control systems.

For those that own and manage large-scale commercial, industrial, and residential buildings, effective life safety systems are critical. Aside from legal obligation, compliant systems ensure risk is managed appropriately, particularly mitigating the threat of fire and smoke. The latter is where Colt comes in. A pioneer and market leader in

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Heat regeneration should be key consideration

Heat regeneration should be key consideration

Many industrial processes require energy, but only a portion of that energy input is used for each operation such as pasteurisation or evaporation. Unused energy is wasted, often passing to the environment as hot gas or liquid. However, by using heat exchangers, it is possible to recapture most of this

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Desigo PXC: automation with flexible scalability in building automation

Desigo PXC: automation with flexible scalability in building automation

Siemens has introduced the latest additions to its automation stations for the Desigo™ building management systems. Desigo is designed to manage any facility, irrespective of its size or complexity, through a range of systems (Desigo CC, Desigo CC Compact and Desigo Optic) all of which can enhance occupant comfort and

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BDC 317 : Jun 2024

Products & Materials : Building Systems & Appliances News

Ideal Heating & ACV launch Low Carbon Systems CPD at CIBSE Build2Perform Live

Ideal Heating & ACV launch Low Carbon Systems CPD at CIBSE Build2Perform Live

Stand 206 Groupe Atlantic companies Ideal Heating – Commercial Products and ACV UK will be exhibiting together at this year’s CIBSE Build2Perform Live event, 5-6th December at London Excel, on stand 206. As part of their Experts Together campaign, both companies will be showcasing their range of commercial heating and hot water solutions and will be presenting a new CIBSE accredited CPD – ‘Low carbon systems: appliances and applications using heat pump technology’. The new CPD is the first one to be developed jointly between Ideal Heating – Commercial Products and ACV UK and follows on from the recent announcement of a £60m investment programme at Groupe Atlantic’s manufacturing site in Hull to further its development of innovative low carbon technologies. As well as covering the principles underpinning the mechanics and operation of a heat pump system, the new CPD will also look at how commercial monobloc air source heat pumps can be best used with other technologies including direct electric. For those not able to attend the CPD presentation at Build2Perform Live, it can be booked through https://idealcommercialboilers.com/cpd-courses and delivered online or in person. Visitors to Build2Perform Live can not only benefit from the CPD, but also see Ideal Heating – Commercial Products and ACV UK products up close. The ECOMOD range of commercial monobloc air source heat pumps will take centre stage for Ideal Heating. These heat pumps, which are available in six outputs from 14kW to 70kW, offer highly efficient COP performance with low environmental impact, thanks to the use of R32 refrigerant. POD Heat Interface Units (HIU), designed to meet all the requirements of the heat network installer, operator and end user, will also be displayed, alongside Ideal Heating’s market leading condensing boilers. The Evomax 2 – the UK’s number 1 selling wall hung commercial boiler – will be shown in cascade to clearly demonstrate its space saving footprint, whilst still able to deliver up to 900kW. Sitting alongside Ideal Heating, ACV will be exhibiting some of its most popular products including the WaterMaster Evo gas fired stainless steel condensing water heater with tank-in-tank technology. Also utilising tank-in-tank technology, ACV’s SMART ME range of stainless steel indirect cylinders will be on show. These have been designed for use with multi-energy sources – including heat pumps – to produce domestic and commercial hot water. Lastly, visitors to the event can also see the E-Tech W wall hung electric boiler range from ACV. Available in seven models, single or three-phase, the range provides an easy to integrate back-up or top-up to heat pumps. With this year’s Build2Perform Live theme addressing delivering Net Zero and adapting to climate change, experienced Specification Managers from both ACV and Ideal Heating will be on hand at the show to not only take visitors through the product ranges, but also provide advice on the most cost-effective means of decarbonising commercial heating.  For more information on CIBSE Build2Perform Live, plus to register for free attendance, go to www.build2perform.co.uk. For more information on Ideal Heating – Commercial Products, visit https://www.idealcommercialheating.co.uk/ and for ACV UK go to www.acv.com/gb Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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Ventilation System Reviews Urged Amidst MEES Compliance Concerns

Ventilation System Reviews Urged Amidst MEES Compliance Concerns

According to recent research, a significant portion of office buildings in the United Kingdom do not meet the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard (MEES) legislation. David Millward, Group Product Manager at Elta Fans, urges building owners and facilities managers to conduct thorough reviews of ventilation systems to fill in any gaps in compliance with the MEES and also Part F of the Building Regulations. Leading UK property consultancy Carter Jonas conducted research revealing only 31.6% of the office stock currently meets the minimum proposed MEES standard of EPC band C or better, which is needed by 2027. Even more concerning, a mere 8.3% of office stock sits in EPC band B, which is the minimum MEES requirement by 2030[1]. With the tightening of MEES regulations, a substantial proportion of office buildings could be unlettable by 2027 unless necessary upgrades are carried out. Following this revelation, David encourages building services stakeholders to look into how ventilation systems are performing. David said: “Keeping a close eye on energy consumption related to ventilation systems can not only help quickly identify performance issues but also contribute to overall sustainability efforts. Addressing these inefficiencies translates into reduced operational costs and a more environmentally friendly operation that complies with the MEES. “We encourage building owners and facilities managers to collaborate with ventilation experts, to pinpoint areas where energy efficiency improvements can be made. As MEES regulations continue to evolve, the need for proactive action becomes increasingly evident. Taking these steps now secures the long-term sustainability and marketability of non-residential properties while providing more comfortable and energy-efficient spaces for tenants.” To meet the impending legislative requirements of MEES, it is essential to also align operations with other regulations such as Part F of the Building Regulations, which governs ventilation, stresses David. One uplift that came during the uplift of the regulations last year is that it is now required for CO2 monitors to be installed to measure air quality in new build office spaces[2]. “At the same time of conducting a review, we advise that to maintain optimal indoor air quality and be compliant with Part F, continuous monitoring is essential, especially in populated spaces such as offices. Although CO2 monitoring is only mandated for new build offices, we encourage everybody to install these systems as they provide lots of other benefits and can help define indoor air quality strategies,” said David. “Monitors provide continuous tracking of crucial indoor air quality parameters. Last year, we launched our partnership with Airthings for this reason to allow building and facilities managers to track CO2 levels, particulate matter, noise levels, relative humidity, temperature, relative light intensity and more. Moreover, the Airthings systems receive constant improvements and over-the-cloud upgrades directly to the device, ensuring accurate and up-to-date data.” “This approach not only promotes occupant health and enhanced productivity but also ensures compliance with environmental and regulatory standards. By combining efficient ventilation system management with continuous indoor air quality monitoring, building owners and facilities managers can create safer, healthier, and more sustainable indoor environments,” concludes David. To find out more about air quality monitoring solutions click here. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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Signify trusts AI for more sustainable cities

Signify trusts AI for more sustainable cities

By John Gorse, Public and Government Affairs Lead, Signify UKI Connected lighting can help AI make smart cities greener The world has become increasingly urbanised. The UN reports that since 2007 more than half the world’s population has been living in cities. That number is projected to rise to 60% by 2030. Increased urbanisation brings with it increased responsibility for cities, especially regarding the environment. Cities account for roughly 70% of global carbon emissions and over 60% of resource use. Put simply, the world is on a collision course with an ecological reckoning and cities are one of the leading contributors. It follows that cities must also be leading drivers of change if we are to make good on our currently faltering climate pledges. And to successfully take climate action, artificial intelligence (AI) has a vital role to play. What is AI? AI is hard to define, both because it covers a wide range of offerings and because it is essentially a moving target—constantly learning and evolving is intrinsic to its purpose. At the most basic level, AI is digitalisation solution that leverages computers and machines to mimic the problem-solving and decision-making capabilities of the human mind. Essentially, it turns human-defined goals into mathematical ones. AI has long been touted as the technological tool that possesses both the greatest potential for advancement and the greatest degrees of risk. Data privacy is one such risk. Smart city technologies rely on data provided by citizens, but that data must be kept out of the hands of bad actors. A hacker with access to a smart traffic control system, for example, could cause mayhem. Legitimate organisations can potentially misuse AI as well, harvesting and exploiting data in ways that infringe on individual privacy. How can smart cities ensure that they’re using AI correctly? How can they use AI to advance their sustainability agendas in responsible and equitable ways? Read on to learn more. AI in cities AI has the potential to impact nearly every aspect of a smart city. It can bolster security with incident detection and intelligent CCTV. It can increase efficiency with traffic and parking management on roads, as well as automated updates and tracking options on public transportation. It can monitor air quality, manage waste, analyse energy usage—and that barely scratches the surface. To do any of these things, AI relies on data. Processing data, recognising patterns, and devising solutions based on those patterns—even predicting potential future difficulties that can be mitigated—are AI’s fundamental pillars. As such, any city that recognises and wants to capitalise on AI’s potential must ensure that its urban services are collecting data as effectively as possible. That’s where connected street lighting can play an important role. Sustainable partners: AI and connected lighting Sensors in streetlights can monitor air quality and temperature. They can also detect sounds—such as gunshots or smashed windows— and then alert first responders in real time, helping citizens feel more secure. Additionally, they help streamline traffic management by offering real-time traffic information and smart parking. This information can be shared with city traffic managers or directly with drivers via an app. Connected lighting is pivotal from a sustainability standpoint too. According to Climate Group, “A global switch to energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) technology could save over 1,400 million tons of CO2.” That’s equivalent to the energy produced by 1,250 power stations. Potential pitfalls AI will be key to addressing social, economic, and ecological challenges at a global scale. However, its limitations must also be acknowledged. AI & Cities: Risks, Applications and Governance, a report published by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) in collaboration with the Mila-Quebec Artificial Intelligence Institute, points to some of these limitations. “In order for an algorithm to reason, it must gain an understanding of its environment,” the authors write. “This understanding is provided by the data. Whatever assumptions and biases are represented in the dataset will be reproduced in how the algorithm reasons and what output it produces.” As noted earlier, AI turns human-defined goals into mathematical ones. But if the human-defined goals are based on existing preconceptions, then the data will end up reinforcing those assumptions. AI also falls short in evaluating its own performance. As the UN-Habitat report notes, “While it may be tempting to see algorithms as neutral ’thinkers,’ they are neither neutral nor thinkers.” AI has no grasp of wider context, and so can only produce results based on its pre-defined optimisation goals, which may be at odds with wider considerations—or worse, serve a misleading agenda. AI systems are mathematical and cannot integrate nuance. This means AI can sometimes end up excluding or underrepresenting subjective, qualitative information from its findings. Minimise risk with governance and accountability There are ways to mitigate the risks associated with AI’s shortcomings. Key among these are governance and accountability. Accountability ensures that some entity is always held responsible—and more importantly, always feels responsible—for AI’s impact. Algorithmic systems evolve, often unpredictably. A change in purpose will change their effects. Proper accountability can help negate mission creep, where technologies are intentionally repurposed for surveillance and other extraneous purposes. It can also help ensure that bad-faith actors aren’t able to willfully mishandle AI’s goals, or to repurpose them over time. AI governance refers to the sum of AI regulations, ethics, norms, administrative procedures, and social processes. Governance helps ensure AI is used in an inclusive and equitable way, and that preconceptions or lack of awareness in the early stages don’t allow AI findings to widen the digital divide or exacerbate existing inequalities. Governance lets local authorities evaluate the opportunities and risks afforded by AI, so they can then apply it in accordance with local context. Consulting citizens and communities is vital, too. The public is every city’s primary stakeholder; it needs to have a voice in how a tool as powerful as AI is being used in a community. This helps ensure AI is fixing local problems, not aggravating them. Responsible AI AI’s capacity for generating and expanding the possibilities of smart

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Colt International show why they are specialists in the design, manufacture, installation, and service of smoke control systems.

For those that own and manage large-scale commercial, industrial, and residential buildings, effective life safety systems are critical. Aside from legal obligation, compliant systems ensure risk is managed appropriately, particularly mitigating the threat of fire and smoke. The latter is where Colt comes in. A pioneer and market leader in smoke control systems which allow smoke out of a building in the event of a fire. Having a system in place that enables smoke to escape is critical to saving lives. But it can also protect assets and reduce the degree of damage to a building. Crucially, when a fire breaks out, reducing the amount of smoke in the building helps those inside, whether they are awaiting fire services or trying to evacuate, because visibility is improved and toxic gases are reduced. Once onsite, fire services can facilitate evacuation more quickly and, with better visibility, rapidly locate the source of the fire in order to speed up extinguishing. Commonly installed in large single-storey factories and warehouses, shopping centres, multi-storey buildings, car parks, and buildings with atria, customers not only rely on Colt’s smoke control technology, but its holistic project managed approach to designing, installing, and maintaining a solution tailored specifically to each project’s need. That means everything a building needs for smoke control. As well as Automatic Opening Vents (AOVs), this also includes fully certified openable ventilators, natural and mechanical shaft systems, access hatches, smoke control dampers, smoke extract fans, smoke and fire curtains and automatic controls. Its multi-disciplined technical expertise, including in-house CFD capability, and in-house engineers mean Colt provides a full turnkey service. It’s little wonder Colt has worked on some of the most prestigious buildings across the UK as well as the tallest structures in the country. These include the 65-storey 22 Bishopsgate (London’s highest commercial building), the 56-storey 1 Nine Elms, and 68-storey South Quay Plaza. Having pioneered the science of smoke control in 1954 when it designed the UK’s first-ever smoke control system to be installed in a manufacturing plant, Colt has continued to set new benchmarks. Continuous innovation from the market leaders One of its latest innovations is the Defender F2, a smoke control damper. Certified to EN12101-8 and tested to EN1363-1 and BS EN1366 Parts 2 and 10, the Defender F2 provides a fire-rated solution when closed and a reliable smoke extract solution when open. Significantly, it has been designed to be seamlessly integrated into the surface of a wall. From an aesthetic point of view it is unobtrusive, unlike traditional louvre damper systems, providing architects greater design control. It’s an example of the wide spectrum of products and solutions Colt can bring to market. While Colt is the market leader in smoke control, as a turnkey service partner it boasts a number of other strengths from smoke and fire damper systems, pressurisation systems for stairwells, car park smoke, fume and CO extraction systems, and the servicing of solar and photovoltaic arrays, as well as brise soleil. Working in collaboration with clients from conception through to commissioning and ongoing maintenance, Colt enables owners and operators to not only address fire safety but unlock a building’s full potential in terms of energy efficiency and architectural design. Its ability to do so lies in its talented personnel. As well as employing all its own engineers, Colt’s vastly experienced design and technical team can develop bespoke solutions tailored to specific building environments and compliance requirements. It also means architects and consultants can work with Colt to identify the best combination of products and systems to achieve the desired effect and performance. Its experts use in-house computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and other design tools such as CAD and BIM to simulate airflows and heat transfer within buildings to assist with designing effective building conditions. Further peace of mind is gained from the fact Colt manufactures its products at its dedicated facility and extensively tests systems prior to installation to verify performance. Independent accredited test houses carry out fire testing, environmental testing (for wind, rain, snow) and safety testing (for load and impact). And no stone is left unturned when commissioning its systems. In compliance with BS7346-8, which is specific legislation relating to the commissioning process, Colt’s multi-stage process includes thorough static testing, functionality, cause & effect and performance testing. The final stage, System Acceptance, involves witness testing, demonstration, sign-off and client training. This is supported by independent 3rd party certification (IFC Certification) for the installation and maintenance of smoke control systems, including smoke and fire curtains – just another step in the process of demonstrating their competence and compliance processes. Colt are fully certified to ISO 9001, 14001 and 45001. They are also (uniquely for the industry), certified to the demanding ISO 37301 for Compliance Management Systems. For Colt engineers, the training never stops Never standing still, Colt continues to evolve. It has, for example, established its own dedicated Training Centre at its manufacturing plant in Havant. Designed specifically for the initial and ongoing training of its maintenance engineers, the centre is equipped with working examples of all the types of smoke control systems that engineers will encounter in the real world. This includes Colt-produced systems as well as those of other manufacturers to ensure engineers have a broader understanding in order to be able to service any system they may encounter. Ongoing training also features regulatory updates and standards in addition to fault-finding to enable first-fix works wherever possible. It guarantees Colt’s engineers remain competent and knowledgeable; ensuring clients have peace of mind that their systems are working as expected. Colt’s enviable reputation has been built on its multi-disciplined approach and almost 70 years of researching and developing systems that have made buildings safer. Its holistic solution is backed by unrivalled in-house technical expertise and highly trained engineers which ensure clients have confidence in the performance of their building safety systems. If you are working on a project that requires smoke control design expertise or manage a building where smoke control maintenance is required, get

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ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions highlights Building Safety Act updates to the Regulatory Reform Fire Safety Order 2005

ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions highlights Building Safety Act updates to the Regulatory Reform Fire Safety Order 2005

ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions UK & Ireland is raising awareness of recent changes made to the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 (FSO) to improve fire safety in buildings, triggered by Section 156 of the Building Safety Act 2022. These improvements came into effect on 1st October 2023, and form Phase 3 of the Home Office’s fire safety reform programme, building on Phase 1 (the Fire Safety Act 2021) and Phase 2 (the Fire Safety (England) Regulations 2022). This phase 3 further strengthens fire safety in all FSO regulated premises by increasing requirements in relation to the recording and sharing of fire safety information to create a continual record throughout a building’s lifespan. Other updates include improving cooperation and coordination between responsible persons, ensuring residents have access to comprehensive information about fire safety in their building, and making it easier for enforcement authorities to act against non-compliance. The Home Office has published three new fire safety guides that are intended to replace the previous guide to making premises safe from fire. The fire risk assessment checklist has also been updated to enable responsible individuals understand and meet the new requirements. Brian Sofley, Managing Director at ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions, commented: “We fully support the Building Safety Act, and welcome the new updates to the Fire Safety Order. “We are seeing a critical need for the recording and sharing of fire safety information, and a way to record and continuously update vital information about a building throughout its lifespan. “We should be managing buildings as holistic systems and allowing people to use information to design, construct and operate their buildings safely and effectively. “This ‘golden thread’ approach is the key to making buildings safer and keeping them safe for the future, as outlined in the Hackitt report. We now have so many digital tools at our disposal such as Building Information Modelling (BIM), utilising these will help us record and share information, and keep it up to date to enable greater transparency and safer environments.” BIM allows building elements such as doorsets to be managed through a single platform – from specification to installation and ongoing inspection. For example, ASSA ABLOY’s Openings Studio™ BIM application integrates with design software to create and visualise openings for complete door, frame and hardware schedules and specifications. This enables seamless extraction of door design intent and all relevant interfaces to assist fabricators to develop complete door requirements that meet building regulations. Product information, performance data and budget information are captured within the BIM design environment. Through real time, collaborative working, these designs can be validated for compliance, functional performance, and aesthetics plus presented as 3D views that can be fully re-integrated into the overall project design. Ongoing inspections can also be captured based on the specific details of each door included in the schedule. This report validates if a door has remained compliant, or identifies what elements need to be corrected or replaced to return the product to the standard required, providing full traceability and ownership of all changes at all stages. Brian adds: “BIM applications can help to lock in positive behaviours from the very start of a project, and support an increase in trust and confidence that safety is paramount throughout a building’s specification, construction and maintenance. “Only by working collaboratively will we see a step change in the industry to raise standards – not only in the construction of buildings to make them safer, but also ensuring they are continually assessed and maintained to uphold compliance.” To find out more about BIM, Openings Studio™ and how ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions can help your organisation,  please call 0845 071 0882, email ukspecification@assaabloy.com or visit www.assaabloyopeningsolutions.co.uk/specification. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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Heat regeneration should be key consideration

Heat regeneration should be key consideration

Many industrial processes require energy, but only a portion of that energy input is used for each operation such as pasteurisation or evaporation. Unused energy is wasted, often passing to the environment as hot gas or liquid. However, by using heat exchangers, it is possible to recapture most of this untapped energy through waste heat regeneration. Heat regeneration (or heat recovery) is the process whereby heat from a process which would otherwise be lost or wasted is recaptured and used for useful heating purposes. Heat regeneration should not be confused with ‘regenerative heat exchangers,’ which are a specific type of heat exchanger in which the product and service fluids flow alternately and the heat is stored in the structure of the heat exchanger. At HRS when we talk about heat regeneration, we mean the recovery of as much surplus heat (or cooling capacity) as possible after the primary function of the heat exchanger has been performed. This can then be reused to either improve the efficiency of heat exchange process or used elsewhere. ‘Recovery and re-use of industrial waste heat is an attractive concept that could simultaneously reduce energy costs and CO2 emissions.’1 Given the importance of energy efficiency in reducing the use of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, it can be argued that it is imperative to employ heat regeneration and recovery at every opportunity. As at least one paper has pointed out, ‘The use of excess heat could also be important to improve the economic and climate footprint feasibility of new processes… by avoiding the addition of new heat production capacity.’2 Benefits of heat regeneration Heat recovery improves the energy efficiency of heat exchange processes, so the greatest benefit of heat regeneration (recovery) is that less energy is required for a particular heating or cooling operation. This obviously provides financial benefits but is also better for the environment compared to systems without heat recovery. Repurposing recovered heat can also reduce the amount of heat required for certain processes. For example, if a material is pre-heated with recovered heat, then it may be possible to complete the necessary heating (for example for pasteurisation) using hot water from another source or part of the factory, instead of requiring a dedicated boiler to provide the necessary temperature rise. By increasing the energy efficiency of the heat transfer process, heat recovery can also make it possible to reduce the size of the heat exchange equipment required or reduce the necessary processing time. Heat recovery in action One example can be found in food pasteurisation processes, where products such as cream need to be heated to the necessary temperature to achieve pasteurisation, then rapidly cooled to maintain shelf life and quality. Such systems involve the use of two heat exchangers: one uses hot water to raise the temperature, while the second uses chilled water to cool the cream down again. The cooling process produces warm water which can be discarded, cooled for re-use, or cooled with some of the heat contained being used to pre-heat the cream before the pasteurisation process. This last option utilises heat recovery or heat regeneration, reducing the amount of new energy required for the subsequent first heating phases. As another example, many biogas plants use heat exchangers to pasteurise the digestate produced during the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. The ‘surplus’ heat which is generated after the system has been running can also be used to pre-heat the digestate, reducing total heat load and improving overall efficiency. Heat recovery can also be used in gaseous applications. Whether it is using the heat from the flue gas of a biogas combined heat and power (CHP) engine to pre-heat digestate, or a large gas-to-gas heat exchanger to capture waste heat from chemical processing, there is no reason to waste the heat present in gaseous products or waste streams. Perhaps the most common use of heat regeneration is demonstrated in multi-effect evaporation systems, where a number of heat exchangers are combined, for example in the HRS DCS Digestate Concentration System. The first evaporation stage heats liquid digestate and uses a cyclone separator; the steam produced from this first cycle (usually available at 70˚C) is then used as the heating media for the second effect, whereby the process is repeated. The subsequent steam (usually available at 60˚C) is then used as the heating media for the third cycle. The number of effects is determined by the level of dry solids required and the amount of surplus heat available, up to a maximum of four cycles. After the final stage, the steam is condensed back to water and this heat is used to pre-heat the incoming product before the first stage of evaporation. In all, the heat is regenerated up to four times in the process. Other considerations To determine the potential value of waste heat, and therefore determine what it can be used for, it is necessary to know a number a parameters about the process temperature, the product and heating (or cooling) medium being used, and the performance of the heat exchange process in terms of heat transfer area and flow rate, for example. It is therefore important to consider energy regeneration or recovery as early as possible. Heat recovery systems can be retrofitted to many processes, but their design is often a compromise and retrofitted solutions may involve excessive pipework and other connections. To maximise the benefits of heat regeneration it is important that waste heat is transferred to the storage media (e.g., water or thermal transfer fluid such as glycol) as soon as possible after its source. This is particularly true where the waste heat is in the form of a gas, as this has a much greater energy constant than liquid, meaning that the heat is lost much faster. By considering all of these factors, it will be possible to calculate both the additional capital costs associated with specifying heat regeneration in a project, together with the savings in running costs and energy, and from this

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UK households need clarity urgently on future home heating, survey reveals

UK households need clarity urgently on future home heating, survey reveals

Property owners and tenants in the UK are largely in the dark about the future options for heating their homes and many remain unconvinced about the Government’s focus in supporting them with the switch to more sustainable heat sources, according to a new survey by Wolseley, one of the country’s largest specialist providers of heating and cooling systems. The poll indicated an alarmingly low level of awareness of alternatives to gas and oil-fired boilers, and demonstrated a broad need for improved public clarity and understanding as the Government moves ahead with revised energy transition policies following its announcement on 20th September. Responses from 1,000 homeowners and tenants across the UK found that: Of the people surveyed, 54% were renters and 42% owned their home. The survey found a crucial knowledge gap among households, suggesting that the Government needs to provide greater clarity and information: These findings follow the Government’s announcement, which saw the delay to a number of key net zero commitments. The Government plans to extend the ban on diesel and petrol cars, as well as the ban on the sale of new gas boilers, to 2035. The Boiler Upgrade Scheme grant is also due to rise from £5,000 to £7,500. “Homeowners are still waiting for the Government to clarify how the energy transition will be accomplished. We need more information on the options, an acknowledgement that no single technology will be the solution, better listening to homeowners and installers, and clear alignment of public funds and policy in the areas where it is needed most. Following the recent announcement by the Prime Minister there is even more of a policy vacuum to support reduction of carbon in the home. Policy will need to address the very significant up-front costs to homeowners, and ideally acknowledge a role for hybrid heat pump systems that can offer carbon reductions at a lower cost to the homeowner in many cases” said Simon Oakland, CEO, Wolseley Group. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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£13.7 million awarded in the first Heat Network Efficiency Scheme funding round

£13.7 million awarded in the first Heat Network Efficiency Scheme funding round

Gemserv is delighted to announce that £13.9 million has been awarded to local authorities, housing associations and private sector applicants in the first Heat Network Efficiency Scheme (HNES) funding round. As a testament to the Government’s commitment to heat network infrastructure across Britain, Gemserv can today confirm that £13.9 million of capital and revenue grant funding has been awarded to improve the efficiency of existing district and communal heat networks. This equates to 45% of the total budget allocated to the scheme and will seek to improve heat networks serving over 11,000 residents, demonstrating its popularity and the demand for support. Heat networks present a vital technology that can deliver efficient, lower cost heating, cooling and hot water to the UK’s built environment at scale. HNES aims to improve heat network performance in existing/operational projects where customers and/or operators are experiencing sub-optimal outcomes. With a focus on reducing customer detriment, HNES supports heat network consumers impacted by the cost-of-living crisis by enhancing efficiency and combating poorly performing networks. Today’s announcement shows the positive engagement from heat network owners and operators across the country as they seek to embrace the technology, ensure customers are getting the best value for money and that networks are operating efficiently. The first three funding rounds have proven incredibly popular, and we anticipate that future rounds will be very competitive. Lord Callanan, Minister for Energy Efficiency and Green Finance, welcomed the announcement today: “Families and businesses shouldn’t have to worry about whether they will receive a reliable heating and hot water supply. This funding means improvements will be made to old and inefficient heat networks, preventing further breakdowns, and ensuring they use less energy. We’re investing millions to build new heat networks, reducing emissions, and providing low-cost heating to communities across the country. But it’s equally important we upgrade and maintain existing systems so everyone benefits. Heat networks offer carbon emissions savings by supplying heat to buildings from a central source, avoiding the need for households and workplaces to rely on individual, energy-intensive heating solutions – such as gas boilers. As such, heat networks provide a significant contribution to the UK’s carbon reduction commitment. But some heat networks haven’t been upgraded since they were installed more than 40 years ago, meaning many are inefficient due to not being installed properly, poorly maintained or the equipment wearing out. The Heat Network Efficiency Scheme (HNES), which opened in February this year, forms an important part of the government’s support for heat networks. This also includes the £288m Green Heat Network Fund, which supports the creation of heat network projects that use a low carbon heating source, such as a heat pump, solar or geothermal energy, to provide heat and hot water to connected homes and businesses.” Commenting on first funding announcement from the HNES scheme, Louise Singleton, Principal Consultant at Gemserv said: “Today’s announcement shows the substantial impact that HNES will have on the efficiency of heat networks across the country. Funding from the scheme today will play a huge part in improving the efficiency and lowering the costs of domestic heating for thousands of residents and businesses. Over £13 million awarded will ensure existing heat network infrastructure is fit for the future, ensuring the technology can provide the most efficient, economical heating for consumers, and preparing them for greater expansion to new and existing homes.” Capital Grant Funding Capital grant funding will go directly towards covering the cost of operational works to improve the efficiency of existing heat networks. In this round, nearly £13 million will directly improve the efficiencies of heat networks serving over 4,000 residents. Housing Associations and Social Housing Providers Notting Hill Genesis Notting Hill Genesis, one of the largest housing associations in London and the South East, has been awarded over £3.6 million for improving the efficiency of heat networks that serve over 800 residents. Building on optimisation studies funded through the HNES Demonstrator, the Glyn Street, Windmill Park, St Pancras Way and Factory Quarter Estate projects will use their capital funding to replace HIUs and pipework, install more efficient control systems and insulation, and for other general efficiency improvements. Southern Housing Southern Housing, one of the largest housing providers in the UK with more than 78,000 homes across London, the South East, the Isle of Wight and the Midlands has been awarded over £176,000 to improve a heat network serving homes on Dagenham Heathway & Church Elm Lane Dagenham, Essex. Additional insulation, new HIUs and other improvements will be installed using funding from HNES which will create a more efficient heat network and as a result a reduction in resident bills and the buildings carbon footprint. Great Places Housing Association Great Places Housing Association,with 25,000 homes across the North West, South Yorkshire and Derbyshire, has been awarded over £1.6 million to improve the efficiency of its Richmond Park heat network, serving 299 residents across the development. Drawing on the recommendations from their HNES Demonstrator funded optimisation study, capital funding will seek to remedy high heat loss issues, bad insulation and old equipment. The Guinness Partnership The Guinness Partnership, with over 140,000 customers across the country, has been awarded £2 million for the improvement of four heat networks serving almost 700 residents. Taking learnings from HNES Demonstrator funded optimisation studies at Whitfield Street and Loughborough Park, these heat networks alongside Bearbrook Place and Edgeley will utilise funding to reduce heat network costs and heat losses, improve insulation and replace outdated infrastructure. Local Authorities Leeds City Council Leeds City Council has been awarded over £2.2 million to improve the efficiency of heat networks serving 837 residents across the borough. Using the recommendations from their HNES Demonstrator funded optimisation studies, Cottingley Heights & Towers, Ebor Gardens and Saxton Gardens will use HNES capital funding from the first round to improve their heat networks’ efficiency through improving insulation levels, reducing heat losses and leakages and for additional improvements. The London Borough of Hackney The London Borough of Hackney will receive over £114,000 to improve the

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Greater focus still needed on skills, hybrid systems and supply chain to make decarbonisation a success, says Baxi

Greater focus still needed on skills, hybrid systems and supply chain to make decarbonisation a success, says Baxi

Following the Prime Minister’s speech on net zero commitments, Jeff House, External Affairs & Policy Director at Baxi, explains what is needed next to continue momentum to decarbonising heat. “We welcome the government’s commitment to improving the Boiler Upgrade Scheme by increasing the total grant to £7,500. As a manufacturer supplying multiple heating technologies including air source heat pumps, we have always been clear that consumer choice is paramount. We need to bring the public with us on a decarbonisation journey and driving consumer demand is a key requirement for developing the heat pump market in the UK. By increasing the grant, we hope that more homeowners will be encouraged to make the switch to heat pumps over the coming years as we see the market continue to grow. “What has not been addressed, however, is the critical skills challenge that faces our industry. We still need to focus on bringing installers with us on this journey towards a greater adoption of heat pumps, so helping both heating engineers and their customers to become more comfortable with the technology is vital. We must also encourage more talent into the industry to grow the number of installers required to reach the installation targets that remain in place. “Baxi has been working with the government on the Heat Training Grant, which provides installers with £500 towards heat pump training. This is a great starting point for encouraging installers to add heat pump installation to their offering. Manufacturers must continue to work with government to create policy and incentives that continue to grow the number of heat pump installers in the UK. “As a company with a wealth of knowledge and expertise from our European parent company, we believe the government has missed a trick with not including tacit support for hybrid heat pump systems as part of this announcement. The technology offers a simpler route to heat pump integration for many types of homes and has been successful in European countries through local incentive schemes. We need clear policy support to bring them into the mainstream as a strategic stepping stone towards the 600,000 annual market ambition and can work with government to make this a reality in the UK. “Manufacturers and government must continue to work closely to ensure there is a robust supply chain for all forms of low carbon heat as we move towards the expected phase out of new fossil fuel boiler installations from 2035. “There are still questions to resolve, including overall budget for the boiler upgrade scheme and how exemptions for 20% of homes from a boiler sales ban, as cited in the Prime Minister’s speech will work in practice. If government works with industry to focus on addressing skills and the low carbon heat supply chain, we will continue to make positive steps towards decarbonising heat and reaching net zero.” For more information on heat decarbonisation, click here. Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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Desigo PXC: automation with flexible scalability in building automation

Desigo PXC: automation with flexible scalability in building automation

Siemens has introduced the latest additions to its automation stations for the Desigo™ building management systems. Desigo is designed to manage any facility, irrespective of its size or complexity, through a range of systems (Desigo CC, Desigo CC Compact and Desigo Optic) all of which can enhance occupant comfort and productivity as well as improve operational and energy efficiency. With the PXC4, 5 and 7 programmable automation stations a flexible solution is available for every requirement. Features include alarm signalling, time switch programs or trend logging functions. The PXC5 is the most recent and is a perfect complement to the PXC4 and PXC7 stations. It has 24 onboard I/Os with the capability to extend this using Siemens TX I/O modules to offer up to 80 points per controller. The PXC4 controller has 16 onboard I/Os, with the PXC7 utilising the TX I/O modules to offer connection of up to 400 datapoints. Ease of integration is ensured through all of the PXC controllers using the BACnet open communication protocol, with the controllers subjected to stringent hardening tests and prepared for BACnet Secure connect, the addendum to the BACnet protocol. The new licence-free Desigo Engineering Framework enables devices to be seamlessly integrated in the same framework for intuitive engineering, with easy wireless access to facilitate building automation. Alarms can be processed on site or remotely through the user’s wireless access to the controller. Security is a central feature of the design, with certificate handling and signed firmware to prevent cyberattacks from malware and viruses. Future-proofing is ensured through the possibility of easy modifications or extensions, while consistent equipment design offers standard handling, installation, maintenance and replacement which is both quick and cost-effective. An automated HVAC system is key to ensuring energy savings and reduced operations costs, also enabling effective compliance with standards. Desigo and its range of PXC controllers offers high performing automation through the integration of different protocols with no need for additional hardware or software. For further information on Siemens Building Products www.siemens.co.uk/buildingtechnologies For further information on Siemens Smart Infrastructure, please seewww.siemens.com/smart-infrastructure Building, Design & Construction Magazine | The Choice of Industry Professionals 

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